Australia v New Zealand, 2nd Test, Hobart, 2nd day December 10, 2011

The pointless finger and Clarke's lost wicket

Plays of the Day from the second day of the second Test between Australia and New Zealand in Hobart
27

The walk
Occasionally a batsman will walk for an edge behind. But pre-empting an umpire's lbw decision is almost unheard of. That's what Ricky Ponting did when he moved across his stumps and was rapped on the pads by a Tim Southee delivery that stayed a fraction lower than he anticipated. New Zealand went up to appeal, but they hardly needed to: Ponting was walking towards the pavilion a second after being struck. By the time the umpire Nigel Llong raised his finger, Ponting was well on his way. While it is an infrequent occurrence such a reaction has happened before. During the 1998 Boxing Day Test, a Dean Headley ball stayed down and hit Michael Slater on the pad. Slater hesitated a moment and then slunk off, "Slow-Death" Steve Bucknor having not yet raised his finger. On this occasion, Ponting's judgment was shown to be sound: replays suggested the ball would have hit the middle of middle stump.

The stumping
Brad Haddin has been under pressure over the past couple of series but, all along, he has maintained that his glovework is at its peak. That was certainly the case when he stood up to Michael Hussey's medium pace, took a ball down the leg side and whipped off the bails as Jesse Ryder briefly stepped out of his crease. It was a marvellous piece of work and the instant huddle the Australians created around Haddin showed how much they appreciated his effort.

The leave
On the opening day, the New Zealand captain Ross Taylor was given lbw when he failed to offer a shot. Again on the second day, a captain lost his wicket, though this time literally, when he shouldered arms. Michael Clarke chose not to play at a Doug Bracewell delivery that moved back in off the seam and clattered into the off stump, knocking it out of the ground and bringing back memories of a similar mistake Clarke made against Simon Jones at Old Trafford in 2005.

The catch
Martin Guptill took a sharp chance at gully to get rid of Phillip Hughes in the first Test, but this time it was Kane Williamson who filled the same position and snapped up an equally tough opportunity to remove James Pattinson. Williamson moved low to his left and got his fingers underneath the ball to end the resistance of Pattinson, who was so disappointed that he trudged off at the kind of pace that would have done Phil Simmons proud.

The pointless finger
If an umpire gives a batsman out, but nobody is there to see it, is he really out? Well, yes, and that was the scenario as Australia's final wicket fell, the result of a successful New Zealand review. Mitchell Starc was given not out by Asad Rauf off the bowling of Trent Boult, but confident that the innings might end then and there, Taylor asked for a referral. The whole procedure played out on the big screen and the players saw the prediction that the ball would have clattered into leg stump. The batsmen walked off, the fielders jogged towards the boundary, and poor old Rauf was left in the middle all but alone, waiting for the all-clear from the TV producers to signal his reversal.

The retrospective recognition
Ten years after he officiated in a Hobart Test, John Smeaton has been officially recognised as a Test umpire. Smeaton was the third official for the match between Australia and New Zealand in 2001, but he was forced to take over on-field duties after Steve Davis hurt his knee climbing over a low fence after the second day's play. Smeaton stayed on the ground until the end of the match, but was not officially regarded as having stood in a Test because he was not appointed to the role from the start of the game. However, the ICC has decided to retrospectively recognise Smeaton as an official Test umpire for his work in that match, and on the second day at Bellerive Oval he was presented with an umpire's hat by the match referee Andy Pycroft. The hat featured the initials JHS and the number 453 - Smeaton's official Test umpire number.

Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on December 11, 2011, 5:05 GMT

    Dravid_Gravitas........ Have you watched the Hobart game? What inconsistant bounce and "hopeless" lateral movement? The bounce has been fine today, and yesterday there were only a few i.e. maybe three, balls that kept low. None of the batsmen were dismissed off balls keeping low. That lateral movement you noticed is what is referred to as the ball seaming. You know, that type of bowling that Sehwag and the other Indian flat track bullies can't play?

  • ToTellUTheTruth on December 11, 2011, 3:20 GMT

    All I hope is that the Indian bowlers (and batsmen) were watching this test and learning something from it. Zak/Ishy/Ummy...please man!! Watch how Aus can fold against a decent (may not be great) bowling attack.

  • DrAtharAbbas on December 11, 2011, 1:27 GMT

    @cricketstargazer, You wrote: "Sides like Pakistan have learnt to exploit seam, swing and turn.Their side looks ready to win anywhere right now." Ten bundles of thanks from a Pakistan supporter. Not many have the manners and courage to say positive things about some other team (even if a reality).

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on December 10, 2011, 22:38 GMT

    @Giovaughn Wilson, I have no problem if the bounce is true, steap and consistent aiding fast bowlers as well as the batsmen. A true bounce, which the batsmen can trust and execute their skills. On tracks such as these there is little room for any kind of fight from the batsmen unless you always play as late as you can ala Dravid style. As much as I admire Dravid for implementing that aspect of batsmanship, there is lot more to batsmanship than just playing extremey late with softest hands. Just because it'll need the skills of Dravid or Kallis, doesn't mean you make great batsmen like Ponting/Sachin who have hard hands/grip/wrists to look poor. Coming to 'inflating' averages - if the sporting/spinning tracks in India are 'roads', why not batsmen from other teams 'inflate' their averages in India? It needs a different skill set to score big on Indian 'roads' and sorry to say that only a handful like Bell, KP, Shiv, Trott, Kallis, Amla, Bravo, Clarke, Hussey seem to possess those skills.

  • 5wombats on December 10, 2011, 22:22 GMT

    @davidpk - nicely put. Yuvraj Singh - for all the yap of the india fans about him and Stuart Broad, and the 6's etc. Yuvraj was Broads bunny in that Test at Trent Bridge 2011, and yes indeed - Yuvraj had that desperation in his eye. Those 6's came back to haunt Yuvraj as he sat in the air ambulance back to india with his "injury". Man of the Series Broad - had the last laugh and Yuvraj played no further part in the Test series. It was lack of technique against good bowling, not the pitch.

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on December 10, 2011, 21:45 GMT

    @CricketingStargazer, I'm not talking about the weather and swing. Please help yourself with some reading glasses. I'm talking of that dodgy 'pitch' - with so much grass left over on the 'pitch' they could as well play the match on the outfield. Secondly, couldn't you see the inconsistent bounce and hopeless lateral movement off the pitch? This is a poor, underprepared pitch. There are no two ways about it. Swing is a different phenomenon and I know about that. Pitches that help spinners/spin from day one are sporting tracks as Dhoni already made it very clear to all those watching him. I hope you understand the difference between such sporting spinning tracks and the dodgy pitch we are seeing in Hobart and other venues in Aus/SA/Eng. I hope ICC is closely watching these dangerous and underprepared grazing fields.

  • on December 10, 2011, 21:40 GMT

    Love it Dravid_Gravitas, love it. You are seemingly one of the simple minded who believe that a wicket is only 'good' or 'fully prepared' if it is a road. From what I've seen of the game the pitch is fine. Sure, it might not be a batsman paradise but with application and hard work runs can be scored.

    The issue for many seems to be the lack of technique against the moving ball (something Indian batsman are equally clueless against). Test is cricket is meant to be just that, a test. It is not a T20 slog but a place where players who can actually play the game are required.

    pentimulite - its LOSE not LOOSE.

  • bumsonseats on December 10, 2011, 21:11 GMT

    cricketingstargazer.i think england/new zealand has a augument for having damp wickets. but australia and south africa dont. yes it can rain big time but they also get plenty of sun and they can be covered during the periods on rain. in the uk yes we can have dry periods but we dont get the heat as the 2 other countries mentioned. dpk

  • CricketingStargazer on December 10, 2011, 20:40 GMT

    Dravid_gravitas, presumably a wicket that turns square on the first morning (as Austalia found on a recent tour of India) is not underprepared? You confuse pitches that are not flat like roads with "underprepared". Similarly, swing is not the fault of the pitch, but rather the atmosphere: should we ban England, Australia and South Africa for having underprepared weather? Sides like Pakistan have learnt to exploit seam, swing and turn.Their side looks eady to win anywhere ight now. India and Sri Lanka will never stay at the top table for long until they accept that "natural conditions" does not just mean those in the sub-continent and start developing a side that can win anywhere in the world on any kind of pitch.

  • bumsonseats on December 10, 2011, 19:12 GMT

    the last time i saw a batter walk off like ponting, was yuvrah at nottingham in the 2nd test v india . but then he had not hit it and the umpire would not give him out so had to go back to the crease. you could see the fear in his eye he wanted off and a few balls later he got his wish. dpk

  • on December 11, 2011, 5:05 GMT

    Dravid_Gravitas........ Have you watched the Hobart game? What inconsistant bounce and "hopeless" lateral movement? The bounce has been fine today, and yesterday there were only a few i.e. maybe three, balls that kept low. None of the batsmen were dismissed off balls keeping low. That lateral movement you noticed is what is referred to as the ball seaming. You know, that type of bowling that Sehwag and the other Indian flat track bullies can't play?

  • ToTellUTheTruth on December 11, 2011, 3:20 GMT

    All I hope is that the Indian bowlers (and batsmen) were watching this test and learning something from it. Zak/Ishy/Ummy...please man!! Watch how Aus can fold against a decent (may not be great) bowling attack.

  • DrAtharAbbas on December 11, 2011, 1:27 GMT

    @cricketstargazer, You wrote: "Sides like Pakistan have learnt to exploit seam, swing and turn.Their side looks ready to win anywhere right now." Ten bundles of thanks from a Pakistan supporter. Not many have the manners and courage to say positive things about some other team (even if a reality).

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on December 10, 2011, 22:38 GMT

    @Giovaughn Wilson, I have no problem if the bounce is true, steap and consistent aiding fast bowlers as well as the batsmen. A true bounce, which the batsmen can trust and execute their skills. On tracks such as these there is little room for any kind of fight from the batsmen unless you always play as late as you can ala Dravid style. As much as I admire Dravid for implementing that aspect of batsmanship, there is lot more to batsmanship than just playing extremey late with softest hands. Just because it'll need the skills of Dravid or Kallis, doesn't mean you make great batsmen like Ponting/Sachin who have hard hands/grip/wrists to look poor. Coming to 'inflating' averages - if the sporting/spinning tracks in India are 'roads', why not batsmen from other teams 'inflate' their averages in India? It needs a different skill set to score big on Indian 'roads' and sorry to say that only a handful like Bell, KP, Shiv, Trott, Kallis, Amla, Bravo, Clarke, Hussey seem to possess those skills.

  • 5wombats on December 10, 2011, 22:22 GMT

    @davidpk - nicely put. Yuvraj Singh - for all the yap of the india fans about him and Stuart Broad, and the 6's etc. Yuvraj was Broads bunny in that Test at Trent Bridge 2011, and yes indeed - Yuvraj had that desperation in his eye. Those 6's came back to haunt Yuvraj as he sat in the air ambulance back to india with his "injury". Man of the Series Broad - had the last laugh and Yuvraj played no further part in the Test series. It was lack of technique against good bowling, not the pitch.

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on December 10, 2011, 21:45 GMT

    @CricketingStargazer, I'm not talking about the weather and swing. Please help yourself with some reading glasses. I'm talking of that dodgy 'pitch' - with so much grass left over on the 'pitch' they could as well play the match on the outfield. Secondly, couldn't you see the inconsistent bounce and hopeless lateral movement off the pitch? This is a poor, underprepared pitch. There are no two ways about it. Swing is a different phenomenon and I know about that. Pitches that help spinners/spin from day one are sporting tracks as Dhoni already made it very clear to all those watching him. I hope you understand the difference between such sporting spinning tracks and the dodgy pitch we are seeing in Hobart and other venues in Aus/SA/Eng. I hope ICC is closely watching these dangerous and underprepared grazing fields.

  • on December 10, 2011, 21:40 GMT

    Love it Dravid_Gravitas, love it. You are seemingly one of the simple minded who believe that a wicket is only 'good' or 'fully prepared' if it is a road. From what I've seen of the game the pitch is fine. Sure, it might not be a batsman paradise but with application and hard work runs can be scored.

    The issue for many seems to be the lack of technique against the moving ball (something Indian batsman are equally clueless against). Test is cricket is meant to be just that, a test. It is not a T20 slog but a place where players who can actually play the game are required.

    pentimulite - its LOSE not LOOSE.

  • bumsonseats on December 10, 2011, 21:11 GMT

    cricketingstargazer.i think england/new zealand has a augument for having damp wickets. but australia and south africa dont. yes it can rain big time but they also get plenty of sun and they can be covered during the periods on rain. in the uk yes we can have dry periods but we dont get the heat as the 2 other countries mentioned. dpk

  • CricketingStargazer on December 10, 2011, 20:40 GMT

    Dravid_gravitas, presumably a wicket that turns square on the first morning (as Austalia found on a recent tour of India) is not underprepared? You confuse pitches that are not flat like roads with "underprepared". Similarly, swing is not the fault of the pitch, but rather the atmosphere: should we ban England, Australia and South Africa for having underprepared weather? Sides like Pakistan have learnt to exploit seam, swing and turn.Their side looks eady to win anywhere ight now. India and Sri Lanka will never stay at the top table for long until they accept that "natural conditions" does not just mean those in the sub-continent and start developing a side that can win anywhere in the world on any kind of pitch.

  • bumsonseats on December 10, 2011, 19:12 GMT

    the last time i saw a batter walk off like ponting, was yuvrah at nottingham in the 2nd test v india . but then he had not hit it and the umpire would not give him out so had to go back to the crease. you could see the fear in his eye he wanted off and a few balls later he got his wish. dpk

  • simon_w on December 10, 2011, 19:07 GMT

    It's great to see a spicy pitch! I love low-scoring Test matches - they always make exciting games. Weak batting on both sides is a major factor, of course, but it's sooo much better to see the ball dominating the bat, than to see the bat dominating the ball. I like a match in which 50 is a major score, and a century is almost sure to win you the game.

  • on December 10, 2011, 17:55 GMT

    It seems Dravid_Gravitas has a really strong admiration for players who are either not good enough or used to be good but just are not good enough anymore. Dravid is a brilliant batsman & you claim to rate him highly but I am not sure you are paying him any compliments when you continuously vouch for mediocre players or batsmen who have passed their use by date. p.s. there is nothing wrong with a pitch that helps the bowlers every now & again. India would have been better able to hold onto the #1 spot if they prepared a few of them instead of the roads they prepare to boost their batsmen egos & averages. Maybe they wouldn't get injured so often & would know how to bowl on a helpful wicket when the chance arrives. If BCCI & the curators in India refuse to help out their bowlers that doesnt mean that the world should follow.

  • samincolumbia on December 10, 2011, 16:00 GMT

    Ponting was supposed to score a century..He just walked off the first opportunity that he could.HAHAHA...Did he break any TV's in the dressing room?

    Ponting is such an overrated player. He was surrounded by greats (best openers, Gilly and best bowlers) and that does a lot to your confidence. Once that security was removed, he has been exposed and it's not a pretty sight at all!!

  • on December 10, 2011, 15:58 GMT

    aussies dont have any batting riches like the yester years......but one things for sure they wont be as bad as windies are.....bcos they have done the review but the talent thats sprouting from their under 19s and 17's have to be strong enough....and @ the moment the batting cupboard looks bare with ocassional brilliance from someone or the othe other thats why they are holding on to pontings a..s!! for such a long time so also bradd haddin....they must be counting their stars and thanking almighty that theres no one challenging their places!!

  • on December 10, 2011, 15:41 GMT

    A final word of advise, under estimate the Indian bowling attack at your own peril. Sharma has taken the 2nd most wickets in tests this year. Zaheer should be coming back from injury & we all know he has a thing for left handers, just ask Graeme Smith & Andrew Strauss. Umesh Yadav has been bowling 140+ kph in India & taking wickets albeit vs Worst Indies. that is only the pace attack. Ashwin & Ohja are also decent spinners. Virat Kohli is under pressure to grab his spot. he struggles vs fast short bowling & has an ego & temper problem. roughing him up with some chin music accompanied by moderate sledging & you may get on top of him. A similar approach may work vs Sehwag & Ghambir as they are not in the best of form in test cricket recently.

    keep Sehwag Dravid, Laxman & Sachin fielding for long periods of time. get them to chase balls in the field. They are all well into their 30's. The more tired they get from fielding the more tired they will be while batting

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on December 10, 2011, 15:24 GMT

    It was an underprepared dodgy pitch to say the least. Stop castigating the batsmen of either side and please leave Ponting alone. I don't know if ICC is watching these substandard pitches where there is no contest between bat and ball. The curator should be suspended and or dismissed for good for not only preparing such a grazing field but also for underpreparing it with such ridiculous inconsistent bounce at one end. I've always thought England, Australia and South Africa prepare dodgy underprepared surfaces; we have one more example of it at Hobart.

  • analyseabhishek on December 10, 2011, 14:19 GMT

    About the Ponting dismissal- I think that in 2007 WC, MS Dhoni had done the same against Sri Lanka off Muralidaran- he was caught so plumb in front- that too on back foot- that he had walked off without bothering to see the umpire's reaction- who of course gave the obvious ruling.

  • pentimulite on December 10, 2011, 13:48 GMT

    NZ WILL WIN AUSSIES WILL LOOSE!!!!!!!!!!

  • Jimmers on December 10, 2011, 13:36 GMT

    I know Ponting feels like he's got a lot of cricket left in him, but it's becoming clear his time is coming to and end, so maybe he ought to retire while he's still near the top. The man has been an amazing and massively successful player and captain, and even though I'm English I'd hate for his legacy to be The Man Who Didn't Know When To Quit. He deserves to be remembered as one of the greatest batsmen who ever lived - probably if he'd retired when he stood down as captain he might have been. Not so sure now. I think he wants to hang on until the Ashes for his swansong - we'll see.

  • on December 10, 2011, 13:20 GMT

    Ponting is waiting for the indian series to score big

  • on December 10, 2011, 12:51 GMT

    not the first time that Clarke has been bowling shouldering arms..seen him do it a few times...against James Franklin in a one dayer..and also against Umar Gul against Pakistan in England.

  • allblue on December 10, 2011, 12:26 GMT

    Ever since the post-greats Australia team lost the momentum bequeathed them it is clear they have problems right through the order. It must be tough for Aussie fans to adjust to their new status, and also to witness the extraordinary inconsistency on display, but as a neutral it really does make compelling viewing. Truly fascinating Test cricket. One thing's for sure, sparks are going to fly one way or another in the upcoming India series.

  • OhhhhMattyMatty on December 10, 2011, 11:51 GMT

    Khawaja, Hughes, Ponting and Warner. Worst Test top 4 EVER!

  • natmastak_so-called on December 10, 2011, 11:33 GMT

    failure is the best teacher. the guy who refused to walk after given out by third umpire and smashing dressing room TVs after being out is now walking for LBW.strange . .

  • natmastak_so-called on December 10, 2011, 11:19 GMT

    he cant score now ,so he is trying to make some place in fans' hearts ,by walking . .

  • CricketingStargazer on December 10, 2011, 10:29 GMT

    The Australian struggle for consistency continues. Against what is one of the weakest sides in Test cricket only a big partnership by the tail has avoided a fourth total under 100 in the last 18 months. The opening pair looks to be one of the weakest in Test cricket at the moment. Phil Hughes started with a bang in Australia with 350 runs in his first 2 Tests, but in his last 15 Tests has just 702 runs @ 27.0: it's figures that you expect from an opener from a minor Test nation. Ricky Ponting averages just 33.8 over the last 2 years and 22.9 over the last year. The bowling looks better than at any time for several years - although it needs to be tested against stronger opposition in less favourable circumstances - but the batting looks weaker than at any time since the mid-'80s.

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on December 10, 2011, 9:20 GMT

    Two weak teams and another humiliation for the Aussies, another in a long, long list of humiliations. When the World number One next play, with the World Number Spinner and Pace Attack in the World: now that will be exciting!

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on December 10, 2011, 9:20 GMT

    Two weak teams and another humiliation for the Aussies, another in a long, long list of humiliations. When the World number One next play, with the World Number Spinner and Pace Attack in the World: now that will be exciting!

  • CricketingStargazer on December 10, 2011, 10:29 GMT

    The Australian struggle for consistency continues. Against what is one of the weakest sides in Test cricket only a big partnership by the tail has avoided a fourth total under 100 in the last 18 months. The opening pair looks to be one of the weakest in Test cricket at the moment. Phil Hughes started with a bang in Australia with 350 runs in his first 2 Tests, but in his last 15 Tests has just 702 runs @ 27.0: it's figures that you expect from an opener from a minor Test nation. Ricky Ponting averages just 33.8 over the last 2 years and 22.9 over the last year. The bowling looks better than at any time for several years - although it needs to be tested against stronger opposition in less favourable circumstances - but the batting looks weaker than at any time since the mid-'80s.

  • natmastak_so-called on December 10, 2011, 11:19 GMT

    he cant score now ,so he is trying to make some place in fans' hearts ,by walking . .

  • natmastak_so-called on December 10, 2011, 11:33 GMT

    failure is the best teacher. the guy who refused to walk after given out by third umpire and smashing dressing room TVs after being out is now walking for LBW.strange . .

  • OhhhhMattyMatty on December 10, 2011, 11:51 GMT

    Khawaja, Hughes, Ponting and Warner. Worst Test top 4 EVER!

  • allblue on December 10, 2011, 12:26 GMT

    Ever since the post-greats Australia team lost the momentum bequeathed them it is clear they have problems right through the order. It must be tough for Aussie fans to adjust to their new status, and also to witness the extraordinary inconsistency on display, but as a neutral it really does make compelling viewing. Truly fascinating Test cricket. One thing's for sure, sparks are going to fly one way or another in the upcoming India series.

  • on December 10, 2011, 12:51 GMT

    not the first time that Clarke has been bowling shouldering arms..seen him do it a few times...against James Franklin in a one dayer..and also against Umar Gul against Pakistan in England.

  • on December 10, 2011, 13:20 GMT

    Ponting is waiting for the indian series to score big

  • Jimmers on December 10, 2011, 13:36 GMT

    I know Ponting feels like he's got a lot of cricket left in him, but it's becoming clear his time is coming to and end, so maybe he ought to retire while he's still near the top. The man has been an amazing and massively successful player and captain, and even though I'm English I'd hate for his legacy to be The Man Who Didn't Know When To Quit. He deserves to be remembered as one of the greatest batsmen who ever lived - probably if he'd retired when he stood down as captain he might have been. Not so sure now. I think he wants to hang on until the Ashes for his swansong - we'll see.

  • pentimulite on December 10, 2011, 13:48 GMT

    NZ WILL WIN AUSSIES WILL LOOSE!!!!!!!!!!