ODI bowling nominees

Swann on song, Bond's swansong

Pace, bounce, swing, seam, reverse and spin - all feature in our shortlist for ODI bowling performances in 2010

Nitin Sundar

January 14, 2011

Comments: 28 | Text size: A | A

Click here for ODI batting shortlist


Stuart Broad had Ricky Ponting caught behind during a three-wicket spell, England v Australia, 2nd ODI, Cardiff, June 24, 2010
Ricky Ponting knew nothing about that ripper from Stuart Broad © PA Photos
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Ryan Harris 5 for 19 v Pakistan
fourth ODI, Perth

Harris launched his one-day career in some style, following up his five-for in the previous match in Adelaide with five more in Perth, in only his third one-dayer. Under lights he made good use of the WACA bounce, mixing it with changes in length and controlled movement. Salman Butt negotiated three inswingers before falling for one that angled across, and Younis Khan was undone by an away seamer as Pakistan's chase of 278 misfired at the top. Harris returned to seal it, bowling Umar Akmal and blasting out Rana Naved-ul-Hasan with a snorter, first ball. He then worked Iftikhar Anjum over, getting him to edge a full ball after testing him with a series of bouncers, to set up Australia's first ODI win against Pakistan in Perth.

Doug Bollinger 4 for 28 v West Indies
second ODI, Adelaide

Bollinger struck early, pinning the in-form Chris Gayle with late swing off the first ball of the match. Runako Morton met with the same fate in Bollinger's third over, beaten by pace and movement to be trapped in front. Lendl Simmons fell to the full delivery that slanted across and nipped away to take the outside edge. From 16 for 4, only one man could hit West Indies out of the rut, but Bollinger had other plans. He returned in the 29th over to force a mis-hit out of Kieron Pollard. Game Australia.

Shane Bond 4 for 26 v Australia
fifth ODI, Wellington

The series may have been lost, but that did not deter Bond from one final tilt at his favourite opponents, in his final one-day game. Chasing 242, Australia had got off to a chirpy start before Bond began to rein them in. Brad Haddin departed when he top-edged a pacy bouncer, and Ricky Ponting fell first ball, unable to keep another fierce bumper down. Tim Southee did his bit from the other end, and despite late resistance from Michael Hussey and James Hopes, Australia were going down. Bond finished them off in his final spell, snapping Nathan Hauritz and Clint McKay up with full deliveries, giving his side a consolation win.

Ashish Nehra 4 for 40 v Sri Lanka
Asia Cup final, Dambulla

Coming in first-change, after Zaheer Khan and Praveen Kumar had softened Sri Lanka, Nehra exploited the spice in the Dambulla track under lights to hand India the Asia Cup. His first spell effectively sealed the deal, as he spiked Sri Lanka's three biggest guns in quick succession. Extra bounce from a length accounted for Mahela Jayawardene, Angelo Mathews was fooled by a hint of away movement and Kumar Sangakkara was hustled into top-edging a well-directed bouncer. By the time Nehra returned to dismiss Lasith Malinga, the Asia Cup was on its way across the Palk Strait.

Stuart Broad 4 for 44 v Australia
second ODI, Cardiff

Australia's openers had motored along to a 50-run stand in good time before Broad induced Tim Paine to edge one down the leg side, setting the tone for an energetic spell. Soon after, Broad ripped the heart out of Australia's batting, getting Ponting with one that reared up from a length and Michael Clarke with the kind of bouncer that he's now famous for. In his final spell, he foxed a leading edge out of the rampant Steven Smith. Australia were forced to settle for a score that was well short of defendable, and England cantered to a 2-0 lead in the five-match series.

Graeme Swann 4 for 37 v Australia
third ODI, Old Trafford

In the very next match, Swann's middle-overs strangle restricted Australia to 212, a score England barely managed to overhaul as they sealed the series with two games to spare. For a change, there was no first-over wicket, but there was a big one in the second, as Ponting was lulled out of the crease with drift and turn to be stumped down the leg side. Extra bounce did for a well-set Watson, and Cameron White swept straight to square leg. Swann underlined his mastery with the wicket of one of Australia's best players of spin, fooling Clarke in the flight and getting him to hole out.

Ryan Harris 5 for 32 v England
fourth ODI, The Oval
Harris' third five-for of the year helped Australia pull one back against England after conceding the series 3-0. It was the perfect setting for Harris - bowling at sundown with a big score to defend - and he made it count. Craig Kieswetter departed to a full in-ducker that sneaked through bat and pad, and Kevin Pietersen walked across and missed a straight, pacy delivery. Eoin Morgan threatened to revive England along with Michael Yardy before he nicked a fuller ball slanting across him. With the pressure mounting, the lower order was there to be had and Harris obliged, getting Tim Bresnan and Stuart Broad to sky catches.


Umar Gul jumps for joy after bowling Tim Bresnan, England v Pakistan, 3rd ODI, The Oval, September 17 2010
A forgettable summer for Pakistan gets off the ground briefly, thanks to Umar Gul © Getty Images
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Umar Gul 6 for 42 v England
third ODI, The Oval

Pakistan's summer of controversy sparkled briefly thanks to Umar Gul's crackling spells to bring them back level from 0-2 down in the five-match series against England. The first of those was a study in the art of combining conventional and reverse swing, while operating at a good pace. Andrew Strauss and Yardy succumbed to scorching in-duckers when the ball was still new, before the in-form Morgan clipped a leg-stump offering straight to square leg. With the run-rate under control, only wickets could have done it for Pakistan, and Gul was on hand to laser a couple of reverse-swinging yorkers past Bresnan and Broad, before getting Swann to scoop a length ball to cover.

Rubel Hossain 4 for 25 v New Zealand
fifth ODI, Mirpur

Having conceded the series against Bangladesh, New Zealand may have thought things could not get any worse, but Rubel Hossain had some more ignominy to heap on them. Daniel Vettori had led a determined effort to restrict Bangladesh to 174 before Rubel ran in with purpose and took advantage of a top order that was by then completely bereft of confidence. Brendon McCullum was late on a pull shot, Jesse Ryder was trapped by a fast, straight one headed for middle stump, and the in-form Kane Williamson flashed at one in the channel outside off, edging to slip. From 20 for 5, New Zealand's lower order staged a remarkable recovery and the last pair threatened to end their tour on a happy note. However, with four required off four balls Rubel blasted out the rampant Kyle Mills with a perfect yorker, and the "Banglawash" was complete.

Thisara Perera 5 for 46 v Australia
first ODI, MCG

It's a game that will forever be remembered for Angelo Mathews and Lasith Malinga's extraordinary ninth-wicket stand of 132, but before that, Perera bullied Australia with an attacking spell of seam bowling. Australia were off to a good start despite the loss of Shane Watson when Perera began to impose himself on proceedings. He warmed up to the task with a gentle away seamer that Michael Clarke nicked behind, before Haddin cut a lifter outside off straight to point. The next ball was a lethal legcutter that Cameron White knew nothing about. Perera returned at the death to send Steven Smith packing with another legcutter, and completed his five by yorking John Hastings.

Click here for ODI batting shortlist

Nitin Sundar is a sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo

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Posted by Rakib_BD_Tiger on (January 17, 2011, 17:55 GMT)

surprised to see rubel hossain instead of shakib, razzak. fantastic bowling by rubel.

Posted by   on (January 17, 2011, 15:43 GMT)

rubel hossain's peformance was the best,i can't forget that day when banglawash was created

Posted by Third_Gear on (January 16, 2011, 13:15 GMT)

Rubel Hossain. Ohhh dear cant forget that moment.

Posted by Raza1005 on (January 15, 2011, 12:23 GMT)

@Wazim, you got it man ;)

Posted by shihab37 on (January 15, 2011, 5:50 GMT)

Good 2 see that RUBEL HOSSAIN is there...:)

Posted by MZHBD on (January 15, 2011, 4:35 GMT)

Umur Gul's performance in that match can not be compared with the rest of the nominees!

Posted by   on (January 14, 2011, 21:18 GMT)

interesting to see how Umar Gul has been placed in the middle, and not on top (generally the one who has taken the highest number of wickets is placed on top, just like Steyn in tests)

Posted by khurramsch on (January 14, 2011, 21:16 GMT)

i think only 2 short listed rayn haris & gul gul won that match from almost lossing position against very good oposition. haris did it against pak but if we compare oposition then it will b gul

Posted by Fareen on (January 14, 2011, 20:30 GMT)

RUBEL HOSSAIN! He just dismantled the kiwis in that game

Posted by Madih on (January 14, 2011, 20:06 GMT)

It has to be Umar Gul. Reverse swing and then yorkers. Just too good for the english batsmen. I hope cricinfo goes for an unbiased approach.

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Nitin SundarClose
Nitin Sundar Social media manager Nitin spent his formative years perfecting the art of landing the googly, before blossoming into a book-cricket specialist. More excellence followed in the underarm version of the game before, like the majority of India's misguided youth, he started taking studies seriously. After four forgettable years of electrical engineering, followed by a rigorous MBA and 16 months in the strategy consulting industry, he began to ponder life's more profound issues. Such as the angle made by Brian Lara's bat with the horizontal at the peak of his back-lift. A move to ESPNcricinfo followed and Nitin is now a prolific nurdler in office cricket, with a questionable technique against the short ball.
About the ESPNcricinfo Awards

The ESPNcricinfo Awards recognise the best individual batting and bowling performances in cricket over the calendar year and across the three international formats. The awards are voted on by an independent jury of former cricketers, commentators, and ESPNcricinfo's senior editors. Shortlists are drawn up by the site and made public at the start of every year, and the jury votes on the shortlisted performances to determine the final winners. Previous winners have included Virender Sehwag (twice), Adam Gilchrist, Shahid Afridi and Kumar Sangakkara.

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