Bangladesh cricket January 11, 2010

A reality sweeter than dreams

From a harsh existence near the sewage-filled Buriganga river to becoming Bangladesh's most famous left-arm spinner, there have plenty of turns in Mohammad Rafique's life
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It's quite a story of a boy who grew up where Dhaka dumps its garbage. Seventy five percent of the city's raw sewage seeps into the Buriganga river every day. Around October each year the water flow stops and within a month the river turns black, a toxic gutter whose stench steadily increases until the water flows through again. Shanty towns and squatter sprawls spread far and wide along the river. Boats still ply up and down, carrying human hope and ambitions for a better life.

Along this river, a little boy from a settlement called Jhinjhira passed his time playing cricket and catching fish. He could have grown into a man still trying to understand why life had been so harsh on him, but he grew up to become Mohammad Rafique, Bangladesh's most famous left-arm spinner.

This romantic rags-to-riches story would still have made some sense had the boy possessed some special gift to turn the ball like no one else in the country. Perhaps, that would have been too simple and Rafique's story is anything but simple. His father had died just after Independence when he was still very young. He was brought up by his mother and grandmother in a joint family. He reached adulthood without even a remote idea that he could turn the ball.

Rafique was playing domestic cricket as a fast bowler for Biman Airlines when Wasim Haider, an overseas player from Pakistan, became the first angel of change in his life. "He asked me to bowl spin," Rafique says. "I was puzzled, but I bowled to him in the nets. Next day, in a match, I bowled five overs of pace before I was asked to try spin. I picked up wickets and that's it from that day I never went back to bowling fast."

We are inside his new four-bedroom duplex built in the same sprawl where Rafique grew up, amidst the squalor, adjacent to the babu-bazaar bridge, and beside Buriganga where he would cross by ferry when he was young to go to town to play cricket. Rafique is planning to move into his new home in a week's time. Something seems to be bothering him, though. He wants a tin-roofed room in the terrace. It would jar as a sore thumb in the shiny new house but it's something from his past that he wants to preserve. "I will host my friends in my tin room," he says.

One would have expected Rafique to escape his past in order to secure a better life for himself and his kids, but he refuses to budge to a "better" neighbourhood. This is where his mother wants to stay and this is where Rafique wants to live. "That's the house of my cousin, this is the house of my brother, that's my uncle's house…" he points out with excitement.

The extended family has slowly taken over the neighbourhood, everyone knows everyone here, and this is where home is for Rafique, beside his Buriganga. He says that the babu-bazaar bridge across the river came up after a documentary of his life was shown post the 1997 ICC Trophy. "The minister asked me what I wanted and I said, a bridge would really help all the residents here and very soon he built one." It's his home, it's where his past was and it's where he wants his future to be. "You get down at the bridge and ask anyone where my house is; you will reach without a problem," he had said on phone. And as it happened that's exactly what occurred.

We had a chat a couple years ago about his bowling and so, now, we move forward to his life post-retirement. You can sense that Rafique is a restless man. It's the new life without cricket that is hurting him, he says. "I get very sad. I don't know what to do. Domestic cricket got over a couple of weeks back and I have been like this ever since. This house-shifting has kept me occupied but for how long. All my life I have played cricket."

This restlessness, though, is helping him firm up plans for the future linked with cricket. He has thought about becoming a curator and now coaching seems high on the agenda. Sourav Ganguly, he says, has called him to coach in the academy in Kolkata but it's in Bangladesh that his heart lies.

It wasn't the most happy retirement decision. Rafique wanted to play for two more years, but the selectors wanted to look ahead of him and he gave up. Incidentally, in his last Test, he reached the 100-wicket tally and called it a day.

You can also sense some bitterness in him when you mention Dav Whatmore. They have had a public spat once before. Clearly, the passion isn't spent still. "His problem was he wanted complete control," Rafique says. "He didn't want the senior players. He would sit in his chair, have his chai, smoke his cigarette and watch the practice. As a professional coach, you need to be hands down and sort out problems at [the] individual level."

Rafique says he also to spoke to the Indians when the talk of appointing Whatmore as an Indian coach started to float around. "I told Sachin Tendulkar, don't take Whatmore. Various groupings will form in the team; he will take the youngsters separately and spoil the team."

However, Rafique is a cheerful person and the innate joy comes forth when he talks about his relationships with Indians and Pakistanis. It's with Harbhajan Singh that he shares a special relationship. Both players went through a difficult phase with suspect actions and that had bound them together. Rafique lost three years of his career because there were some murmurs about his action which saw him dropped after his first Test. He rebounded back in style and it was around this time he bumped into Harbhajan. "We discussed our actions. I told him don't bowl the doosra with a different grip, use the same action," he says. "Over the years I have built a great relationship with him. He has helped me get sponsors and still keeps in touch."

If Harbhajan brought a warm smile, the first mention of Tendulkar in our chat brings a delightfully infectious chuckle. Rafique had just finished talking about how getting Ricky Ponting out in a Test gave him lot of satisfaction (He had hit me for 12 runs in the over and I got his wicket immediately). What about your battles with Sachin? "Sachin ko bahut liya…! (I have taken him out many times)" he says with the mischievous laughter of a school boy that fills up the barely-furnished room and spills over to the outside room where carpenters are working on furnishing the big empty living room. Rafique has got Tendulkar twice in ODIs from eight games and also clean bowled him once in the Tests. His first ODI wicket was in fact that of Tendulkar. "Sachin used to tell me, we only discuss you in our team meeting when we played Bangladesh. 'Usko seedha khel lo,' (play him straight), Tendulkar would tell the other batsmen." Rafique had a good arm-ball and was never shy of using it in his career.

You can see that Rafique is a very happy man with what he has done in cricket. Who wouldn't be? He has featured in Bangladesh's first Test, his 5 for 65 helped Bangladesh win their first Test,, hit 77 helped them clinch their first ODI win, and once, he hit an astonishing 111 from No. 9 to help secure a precious first-innings lead against West Indies. It has been a career that the young boy who used to run around Buriganga wouldn't have even dared to dream. Sometimes, reality can taste even sweeter than your dreams. Ask Rafique.

Sriram Veera is a staff writer at Cricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • amalsp on January 12, 2010, 3:01 GMT

    Great article about a great player. When he was playing in the team he was about the only one worth watching. He is a true banga great. I also remember Athar Ali Khan playing and thought what a classy player. Unfortunately he didn't play for long after that. If he had played for some time, he also would have been a great player.

  • stalefresh on January 11, 2010, 23:41 GMT

    amazing story! Sometimes learning the truth is as inspiring as living it. Thanks for sharing this gem on Rafique. I hope he see's more success in future.

  • realredbaron on January 11, 2010, 23:25 GMT

    beautiful article. a journey full of emotion and heart over harshness of Earthly reality. Mohammad Rafique is a gifted cricketer and human being.

  • KhajaBaba on January 11, 2010, 21:23 GMT

    Rafique is the most popular individual sportsman in Bangladesh so far.

  • cric.amin on January 11, 2010, 19:52 GMT

    I am from England, As I can say I am mad of cricket, when BD team come to England tour, I always watch every game including practice game, wherever playing in england & what ever the result of Bangladeshi Team it doesn't matter always support them. One of the young players team of world cricket, But they need few senior players like Mohammad Rafique ( Bangladeshi cricket legend) Whos contribution always miss the Bangladeshi young side, second man is Khaled Mashud Pilot. Both neglected by the cricket board ( which people doesn't know about cricket development). I really miss the great Bangladeshi legspinner allrounder, for his aggressive bowling & batting. Also hate that kind of Bangladeshi selector who always avoid the great player, Another thing, I saw the news on Cricket Archive Rafique lead Abahani CC by his allround performance on their Recent premier division T20 triump over Mohamadan CC. Also many thanks to Sriram Veera for his Nice article.

  • bonaku on January 11, 2010, 18:05 GMT

    sure he is a great player for bangladesh and will inspire more ppl from the bangladesh to take up the game.

  • vineetphysics2006 on January 11, 2010, 17:35 GMT

    he was a fabulous spinner ,had he played for INDIA ,PAKISTAN, AUSTRALIA ,OR any other strong team he would have taken T LEAST 300+ WICKETS IN TEST ,BUT STILL i remember him as one of the best spinner I have seen.

  • AtTiDuDe on January 11, 2010, 17:24 GMT

    one of the best i have seen in cricket..... in my memory he is one of first bangladeshi cricketer who was aggressive and had killing instict feature in him..... he pioneered the team, whatever this team is today..

  • tiger.emon on January 11, 2010, 17:03 GMT

    An excellent article...we all love you rafiq bhai...

  • Tashmeem on January 11, 2010, 17:00 GMT

    He is a genuine legend.From where he has achieved his success is unbelievable.We miss him very much in Bangladesh Cricket Team.I can remember the big six he has hitted in the first ever ODI win of Bangladesh against Kenya.

  • amalsp on January 12, 2010, 3:01 GMT

    Great article about a great player. When he was playing in the team he was about the only one worth watching. He is a true banga great. I also remember Athar Ali Khan playing and thought what a classy player. Unfortunately he didn't play for long after that. If he had played for some time, he also would have been a great player.

  • stalefresh on January 11, 2010, 23:41 GMT

    amazing story! Sometimes learning the truth is as inspiring as living it. Thanks for sharing this gem on Rafique. I hope he see's more success in future.

  • realredbaron on January 11, 2010, 23:25 GMT

    beautiful article. a journey full of emotion and heart over harshness of Earthly reality. Mohammad Rafique is a gifted cricketer and human being.

  • KhajaBaba on January 11, 2010, 21:23 GMT

    Rafique is the most popular individual sportsman in Bangladesh so far.

  • cric.amin on January 11, 2010, 19:52 GMT

    I am from England, As I can say I am mad of cricket, when BD team come to England tour, I always watch every game including practice game, wherever playing in england & what ever the result of Bangladeshi Team it doesn't matter always support them. One of the young players team of world cricket, But they need few senior players like Mohammad Rafique ( Bangladeshi cricket legend) Whos contribution always miss the Bangladeshi young side, second man is Khaled Mashud Pilot. Both neglected by the cricket board ( which people doesn't know about cricket development). I really miss the great Bangladeshi legspinner allrounder, for his aggressive bowling & batting. Also hate that kind of Bangladeshi selector who always avoid the great player, Another thing, I saw the news on Cricket Archive Rafique lead Abahani CC by his allround performance on their Recent premier division T20 triump over Mohamadan CC. Also many thanks to Sriram Veera for his Nice article.

  • bonaku on January 11, 2010, 18:05 GMT

    sure he is a great player for bangladesh and will inspire more ppl from the bangladesh to take up the game.

  • vineetphysics2006 on January 11, 2010, 17:35 GMT

    he was a fabulous spinner ,had he played for INDIA ,PAKISTAN, AUSTRALIA ,OR any other strong team he would have taken T LEAST 300+ WICKETS IN TEST ,BUT STILL i remember him as one of the best spinner I have seen.

  • AtTiDuDe on January 11, 2010, 17:24 GMT

    one of the best i have seen in cricket..... in my memory he is one of first bangladeshi cricketer who was aggressive and had killing instict feature in him..... he pioneered the team, whatever this team is today..

  • tiger.emon on January 11, 2010, 17:03 GMT

    An excellent article...we all love you rafiq bhai...

  • Tashmeem on January 11, 2010, 17:00 GMT

    He is a genuine legend.From where he has achieved his success is unbelievable.We miss him very much in Bangladesh Cricket Team.I can remember the big six he has hitted in the first ever ODI win of Bangladesh against Kenya.

  • Nipun on January 11, 2010, 16:15 GMT

    Oh yes,I had missed an important point;I miss Mohammad Rafique!!!After years of seeing him carry Bangladesh's bowling on his broad & tough shoulders,I still feel something,someone is missing when Bangladesh takes the field nowadays.Rafique da is sorely missed.....

  • zayeedh on January 11, 2010, 16:05 GMT

    Mohammad Rafique and Khaled Mashud Pilot, are those two names which no one will ever be able to wipe out from the cricjet history of Bangladesh. and both of them had been neglected by board and coach!

    no matter what Rafiq bhai you will be in our heart and at the heart of all the Bangladeshi's who will ever take birth and love cricket!

    you people are immortal!

    all my love and respect!

  • anish_hlr on January 11, 2010, 15:45 GMT

    i liked the way rafique played for bangladesh.. bangladesh wil be lucky to have him back any time... we will like to see him in IPL.... he performed always well for bangladesh....

  • tigers_eye on January 11, 2010, 15:21 GMT

    Mo Rafique is the only one to have 100 wickets and 1000+ runs in both ODIs and tests. He is the only reason we have so many SLAs. Almost every league team would feature a SLA and everyone of them are decent bowlers. Thank you Mo Rafique for the memories. I hope you churn out more SLAs and start making wickets that would help these SLAs. Thank SV for the article.

  • mahmud99 on January 11, 2010, 14:15 GMT

    rafique is one of the best player i ever seen in bangladesh cricket.

  • ShamsFerdous on January 11, 2010, 12:12 GMT

    I remember the time when we were in Abahani Math (in dhanmondi), where Ispahani and Beximco were playing domestic league. Sir Rafique was fielding only a hand away from me and the boundary rope. Me and my friends were skipping our class to see the game. A friend of ours came late to the field to watch the game, so he called me to ask where I was in the field, without hesitating I said "I'm with Rafique Bhai". He laughed with shy and the most of the people around us found it funny at that moment. Addressing him as a reference on the field in that day may have seemed funny at that time, but today he stands as a reference on defining and reminding of our capability to cross on for good.

  • Abudaud on January 11, 2010, 11:47 GMT

    I am from Pakistan, we love cricket, and Bangladesh team is our second one in the world. What ever be the situation and result, we always support Bangladesh team. I am writing these lines just to be the part of History, of the great cricketer of Bangladesh Muhammad Refique.................. i am sure we will see a little RAFIQUE in action in the forcoming decade.........Muhammad Rafique we love you...........Abid from Pakistan

  • Hasan-Shahid on January 11, 2010, 10:30 GMT

    I don't know why I like Rafique so much, may be it's because he smiles every time, may be it's because he was the father figure of our successes. But in general he is the most popular cricketer in Bangladesh even after retiring from cricket. I still can remember how he fought for us in the SARCC (South Asian Regional Cricket) tournament in the mid 90s and that was the beginning for him as well as Bangladesh. He performed well in the ICC trophy 1997 where we were reborn as a cricketing nation. And who can forget the World Cup '07 ? In fact Rafique is everywhere. People like him because he is very simple, polite and social. I wish we could have him back again in our Bangladesh side, but we know it will never happen. As Khaled Masud (the wicket keeper with whom Rafique played) won't shout again saying 'Come on Rafique, Come on...Come on'. We really miss you Rafique. Thanks to Sriram Veera for bringing him again.

  • Nipun on January 11, 2010, 10:29 GMT

    Mohammad Rafique was Bangladesh's only world-class player before the emergence of Sakib(though he has teramiles to go in his career).Thoroughly enjoyable article.which isn't always the case with Sriram Veera.

  • emarald on January 11, 2010, 10:12 GMT

    he is one of my favourite player in international cricket..he is the most famed cricketer in bangladesh..the never ending queue of left arm spin bowlers in mangladesh is the credit for rafique's contribution to bangladesh cricket..all of them aspire to be a rafique.its sad how his career ended..most criket does not know how to deal witnh ageing superstars.

  • Gautie on January 11, 2010, 8:51 GMT

    Excellent Article. Just loved the article a lot. Well Done Sriram! Keep Going....

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  • Gautie on January 11, 2010, 8:51 GMT

    Excellent Article. Just loved the article a lot. Well Done Sriram! Keep Going....

  • emarald on January 11, 2010, 10:12 GMT

    he is one of my favourite player in international cricket..he is the most famed cricketer in bangladesh..the never ending queue of left arm spin bowlers in mangladesh is the credit for rafique's contribution to bangladesh cricket..all of them aspire to be a rafique.its sad how his career ended..most criket does not know how to deal witnh ageing superstars.

  • Nipun on January 11, 2010, 10:29 GMT

    Mohammad Rafique was Bangladesh's only world-class player before the emergence of Sakib(though he has teramiles to go in his career).Thoroughly enjoyable article.which isn't always the case with Sriram Veera.

  • Hasan-Shahid on January 11, 2010, 10:30 GMT

    I don't know why I like Rafique so much, may be it's because he smiles every time, may be it's because he was the father figure of our successes. But in general he is the most popular cricketer in Bangladesh even after retiring from cricket. I still can remember how he fought for us in the SARCC (South Asian Regional Cricket) tournament in the mid 90s and that was the beginning for him as well as Bangladesh. He performed well in the ICC trophy 1997 where we were reborn as a cricketing nation. And who can forget the World Cup '07 ? In fact Rafique is everywhere. People like him because he is very simple, polite and social. I wish we could have him back again in our Bangladesh side, but we know it will never happen. As Khaled Masud (the wicket keeper with whom Rafique played) won't shout again saying 'Come on Rafique, Come on...Come on'. We really miss you Rafique. Thanks to Sriram Veera for bringing him again.

  • Abudaud on January 11, 2010, 11:47 GMT

    I am from Pakistan, we love cricket, and Bangladesh team is our second one in the world. What ever be the situation and result, we always support Bangladesh team. I am writing these lines just to be the part of History, of the great cricketer of Bangladesh Muhammad Refique.................. i am sure we will see a little RAFIQUE in action in the forcoming decade.........Muhammad Rafique we love you...........Abid from Pakistan

  • ShamsFerdous on January 11, 2010, 12:12 GMT

    I remember the time when we were in Abahani Math (in dhanmondi), where Ispahani and Beximco were playing domestic league. Sir Rafique was fielding only a hand away from me and the boundary rope. Me and my friends were skipping our class to see the game. A friend of ours came late to the field to watch the game, so he called me to ask where I was in the field, without hesitating I said "I'm with Rafique Bhai". He laughed with shy and the most of the people around us found it funny at that moment. Addressing him as a reference on the field in that day may have seemed funny at that time, but today he stands as a reference on defining and reminding of our capability to cross on for good.

  • mahmud99 on January 11, 2010, 14:15 GMT

    rafique is one of the best player i ever seen in bangladesh cricket.

  • tigers_eye on January 11, 2010, 15:21 GMT

    Mo Rafique is the only one to have 100 wickets and 1000+ runs in both ODIs and tests. He is the only reason we have so many SLAs. Almost every league team would feature a SLA and everyone of them are decent bowlers. Thank you Mo Rafique for the memories. I hope you churn out more SLAs and start making wickets that would help these SLAs. Thank SV for the article.

  • anish_hlr on January 11, 2010, 15:45 GMT

    i liked the way rafique played for bangladesh.. bangladesh wil be lucky to have him back any time... we will like to see him in IPL.... he performed always well for bangladesh....

  • zayeedh on January 11, 2010, 16:05 GMT

    Mohammad Rafique and Khaled Mashud Pilot, are those two names which no one will ever be able to wipe out from the cricjet history of Bangladesh. and both of them had been neglected by board and coach!

    no matter what Rafiq bhai you will be in our heart and at the heart of all the Bangladeshi's who will ever take birth and love cricket!

    you people are immortal!

    all my love and respect!