Bangladesh news August 12, 2013

Ashraful expects leniency from ACSU

17

Mohammad Ashraful expects some leniency from the ICC's Anti-Corruption and Security Unit, which is expected to present its report on corruption in the BPL to the Bangladesh Cricket Board this week. A five-member ICC delegation, led by the CEO Dave Richardson, arrived in Dhaka on Monday evening, and will hold a press conference on Tuesday, which will also be attended by BCB president Nazmul Hassan, and where the verdict on Ashraful's involvement is likely to come out.

Ashraful, who was suspended by the BCB after admitting his involvement in alleged match-fixing and spot-fixing in the BPL, believes his confession and cooperation with the ACSU should result in a reduced suspension. For someone who is still to be punished, Ashraful is already considering a long lay-off, and also contemplating a comeback.

"I tried my best to cooperate with the investigation. Now if they take it into consideration, I think my punishment should come down to two or three years," Ashraful said. "I will be 32 after three years. I believe it won't be the end as there are many cricketers who played and are still playing at that age. (Sanath) Jayasuriya did, Sachin (Tendulkar) is still playing."

The ACSU were put in charge of formulating anti-corruption measures for the 2013 BPL, after which they handed Hassan a list of suspects. In mid-May, theKaler Kantha, a Dhaka-based Bengali daily, broke the story that Ashraful was a chief suspect in BPL-related corruption.

Since his admission, Ashraful has been seen in several social events, including Tamim Iqbal's wedding and iftar parties hosted by former BCB president Saber Hossain Chowdhury and has also met the BCB chief. Critics have seen this as an attempt by the former captain to garner sympathy.

A former Bangladesh captain told ESPNcricinfo that Ashraful should be punished "because it would set a good example" but added that he too thinks the punishment could be reduced in light of Ashraful's reported cooperation with the ACSU.

Only a summary of the ACSU's report is likely to be mentioned in the press conference on Tuesday, during which new names are unlikely to come out. Only the findings and recommendations will be revealed, after which the BCB has to follow the ICC's procedure of discipline.

Hassan is yet to confirm if the BCB would set up a tribunal according to its own anti-corruption guidelines to decide the punishment. Hassan, who had earlier said the BCB would adhere to whatever the ACSU report recommends, later back-tracked and said he would act according to the board's own rules and regulations.

With the ICC taking corruption in the BPL seriously enough to send Richardson to Dhaka, it is also likely that the game's governing body will have a major say in the next steps of the process.

Mohammad Isam is ESPNcricinfo's Bangladesh correspondent. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • javed.agrawala on August 13, 2013, 11:10 GMT

    I am writing from Pakistan. Though what is there above, despite all, is still in favor of Amir, Asif and Butt the truth is that their admissions (excluding Asif, who till last still claims innocence) came after being proven guilty by the ICC twice and by the legal system with stricter rules once. Butt is only trying to ease his ban that he now knows will not be so done, if at all, until their is admission and then contrition. Ashraful is acting cocky and should be handed the standard sentence. The ICC code does not have a clause for remission due to age etc. and Boards should follow the same regulation. BTW Butt and Co were decidedly irritating and worse in wasting the county's emotions in presenting themselves as victims in a conspiracy and then for continuing with this line of seeking sympathy. This carried on for a couple of years or so. There should be additional penalty for presenting oneself as an innocent victim of blind justice rather than as an errant seeking remission.

  • on August 13, 2013, 10:12 GMT

    yeah all u have to do is o fix and then when u r caught just admit it so u r shown ssome leniancy hahahahaha :D

  • Haleos on August 13, 2013, 9:58 GMT

    There should not be any leniency. Every cricketer should know what happens when you are on the wrong side. Age, Financial background etc should not matter. This is not the first case in the world so Admitting guilt should not be considered too. He knew very well what he was doing. He was a talented cricketer and his fans supported him. He has let them down too. There is enough money in cricket to be earned honestly. They are paid extremely well these days and can survive the remaining life with ease even if they play for 5-10 years.

  • on August 13, 2013, 9:46 GMT

    Ashraful is in no position to say what his punishment "should" be. He should be treated harshly for what he has done. I find it surprising how lightly he is taking this; it seems like he is confident that he will be back after a couple of years and a spot will be ready for him then. He has been a failure and a disgrace for Bangladesh for a decade and has achieved very little as a player. I doubt if he is even among the top 20 cricketers for Bangladesh at the moment. He certainly didn't deserve a place in the team after 2006, if you ask me.

  • M_Rakibul_Islam on August 13, 2013, 9:27 GMT

    No leniency shud b shown. He may face a 5 years ban & others shud b 10 years as they didn't reveal it to ACSU.

  • keptalittlelow on August 13, 2013, 9:07 GMT

    Yes Amir, Asif and Butt took years to admit their guilt yet it does not warrant any leniency for other culprits. Examples must be set to stamp out this crime.

  • on August 13, 2013, 9:04 GMT

    He is the first player who accepted his involvement. Taking this into consideration, there should be some leniency in his case so that others take lesson from his stand and apologize to their countrymen.

  • vish57 on August 13, 2013, 9:02 GMT

    Ban such players from playing cricket for life however dont scrap their record after all they performed also for their country/team.

  • on August 13, 2013, 8:59 GMT

    should be punished harshly.............

  • --.-- on August 13, 2013, 5:58 GMT

    Fighting match-fixing has kind of become melee. Yes, I'm in favour of giving harsh punishment to Ashraful. However, I feel he did a great job by admitting he was in to it straight away unlike Amir, Asif and Butt who took years to admit the same.

  • javed.agrawala on August 13, 2013, 11:10 GMT

    I am writing from Pakistan. Though what is there above, despite all, is still in favor of Amir, Asif and Butt the truth is that their admissions (excluding Asif, who till last still claims innocence) came after being proven guilty by the ICC twice and by the legal system with stricter rules once. Butt is only trying to ease his ban that he now knows will not be so done, if at all, until their is admission and then contrition. Ashraful is acting cocky and should be handed the standard sentence. The ICC code does not have a clause for remission due to age etc. and Boards should follow the same regulation. BTW Butt and Co were decidedly irritating and worse in wasting the county's emotions in presenting themselves as victims in a conspiracy and then for continuing with this line of seeking sympathy. This carried on for a couple of years or so. There should be additional penalty for presenting oneself as an innocent victim of blind justice rather than as an errant seeking remission.

  • on August 13, 2013, 10:12 GMT

    yeah all u have to do is o fix and then when u r caught just admit it so u r shown ssome leniancy hahahahaha :D

  • Haleos on August 13, 2013, 9:58 GMT

    There should not be any leniency. Every cricketer should know what happens when you are on the wrong side. Age, Financial background etc should not matter. This is not the first case in the world so Admitting guilt should not be considered too. He knew very well what he was doing. He was a talented cricketer and his fans supported him. He has let them down too. There is enough money in cricket to be earned honestly. They are paid extremely well these days and can survive the remaining life with ease even if they play for 5-10 years.

  • on August 13, 2013, 9:46 GMT

    Ashraful is in no position to say what his punishment "should" be. He should be treated harshly for what he has done. I find it surprising how lightly he is taking this; it seems like he is confident that he will be back after a couple of years and a spot will be ready for him then. He has been a failure and a disgrace for Bangladesh for a decade and has achieved very little as a player. I doubt if he is even among the top 20 cricketers for Bangladesh at the moment. He certainly didn't deserve a place in the team after 2006, if you ask me.

  • M_Rakibul_Islam on August 13, 2013, 9:27 GMT

    No leniency shud b shown. He may face a 5 years ban & others shud b 10 years as they didn't reveal it to ACSU.

  • keptalittlelow on August 13, 2013, 9:07 GMT

    Yes Amir, Asif and Butt took years to admit their guilt yet it does not warrant any leniency for other culprits. Examples must be set to stamp out this crime.

  • on August 13, 2013, 9:04 GMT

    He is the first player who accepted his involvement. Taking this into consideration, there should be some leniency in his case so that others take lesson from his stand and apologize to their countrymen.

  • vish57 on August 13, 2013, 9:02 GMT

    Ban such players from playing cricket for life however dont scrap their record after all they performed also for their country/team.

  • on August 13, 2013, 8:59 GMT

    should be punished harshly.............

  • --.-- on August 13, 2013, 5:58 GMT

    Fighting match-fixing has kind of become melee. Yes, I'm in favour of giving harsh punishment to Ashraful. However, I feel he did a great job by admitting he was in to it straight away unlike Amir, Asif and Butt who took years to admit the same.

  • --.-- on August 13, 2013, 5:54 GMT

    There might be players who might vouch for Ashraful but that doesn't mean he should get away with what he has done.

  • --.-- on August 13, 2013, 5:53 GMT

    Why leniency ? The concerned authorities should show no laxity in this case and Ashraful should be been given harsh punishment.

  • CrICkeeet on August 13, 2013, 1:39 GMT

    ICC gave 5 & 7 years ban 4 Amir, Butt nd asif.... Ashraful might get sm reward 2 xpress d true fact nd mayb its under 7 years.....

  • on August 12, 2013, 23:41 GMT

    I disagree with cric_fric. Leniency is the right way to go. Because, that will encourage people to co-operate. And we need co-operations of these people to catch all the others.

  • Chris_P on August 12, 2013, 23:41 GMT

    Why should he expect anything less than the harshest sentence? Is there going to be a message sent to the players or not? Treat them exactly the same way they treated our great game. Be off with you, MA, I hope you never step onto another cricket ground again.

  • Legaleagle on August 12, 2013, 22:34 GMT

    No leniency!! ICC should stick to absolutely zero tolerance towards corruption. He should be made an example for others.

  • cric_fric on August 12, 2013, 20:03 GMT

    There should be no leniency towards any players or officials who are involved in match/spot fixing be it at the domestic or international level. Why should any cricket fan spend any of their time and money if these so called professionals have already decided fate of the game without stepping a foot on the field cheating millions of fan. ICC and Cricket Boards, Please don't try to set any examples just keep things plain and simple in the rulebook that if anyone is found with enough supporting evidence that they are involved in any type of fixing, they will be banned for life. No body will and can complain if they are found cheating afterward.

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  • cric_fric on August 12, 2013, 20:03 GMT

    There should be no leniency towards any players or officials who are involved in match/spot fixing be it at the domestic or international level. Why should any cricket fan spend any of their time and money if these so called professionals have already decided fate of the game without stepping a foot on the field cheating millions of fan. ICC and Cricket Boards, Please don't try to set any examples just keep things plain and simple in the rulebook that if anyone is found with enough supporting evidence that they are involved in any type of fixing, they will be banned for life. No body will and can complain if they are found cheating afterward.

  • Legaleagle on August 12, 2013, 22:34 GMT

    No leniency!! ICC should stick to absolutely zero tolerance towards corruption. He should be made an example for others.

  • Chris_P on August 12, 2013, 23:41 GMT

    Why should he expect anything less than the harshest sentence? Is there going to be a message sent to the players or not? Treat them exactly the same way they treated our great game. Be off with you, MA, I hope you never step onto another cricket ground again.

  • on August 12, 2013, 23:41 GMT

    I disagree with cric_fric. Leniency is the right way to go. Because, that will encourage people to co-operate. And we need co-operations of these people to catch all the others.

  • CrICkeeet on August 13, 2013, 1:39 GMT

    ICC gave 5 & 7 years ban 4 Amir, Butt nd asif.... Ashraful might get sm reward 2 xpress d true fact nd mayb its under 7 years.....

  • --.-- on August 13, 2013, 5:53 GMT

    Why leniency ? The concerned authorities should show no laxity in this case and Ashraful should be been given harsh punishment.

  • --.-- on August 13, 2013, 5:54 GMT

    There might be players who might vouch for Ashraful but that doesn't mean he should get away with what he has done.

  • --.-- on August 13, 2013, 5:58 GMT

    Fighting match-fixing has kind of become melee. Yes, I'm in favour of giving harsh punishment to Ashraful. However, I feel he did a great job by admitting he was in to it straight away unlike Amir, Asif and Butt who took years to admit the same.

  • on August 13, 2013, 8:59 GMT

    should be punished harshly.............

  • vish57 on August 13, 2013, 9:02 GMT

    Ban such players from playing cricket for life however dont scrap their record after all they performed also for their country/team.