March 22, 2008

Indian Cricket

Last post

Mukul Kesavan

This was meant to be a year-long blog and it's a couple of months over that limit now. Blogging about cricket without any right to has been entertaining. I wasn't edited, which was strange but nice, and readers wrote in, which was gratifying. The last year has been good to people like me who track the Indian team to wallow in Test match success. There was success to wallow in, for instance (not always the case in the forty-something years of my fan-dom); even the rubber we lost in Australia was so stirring it felt like we had won. It was such a good year that the limited overs game was nearly memorable: the Twenty20 triumph in South Africa was a landmark; so was the CB Series win.

I can't see that there's going to be a tour to top the one in Australia any time soon, so this looks like a good place to stop. If, like an Australian, I was used to winning, I might see the past year as the start of a hot new streak, but I'm not. I'm a desi fan who has learnt over time to keep his fingers crossed, not to push his luck and to quit when he's ahead. If a brave new world of cricket beckons, with new forms of the game, new leagues and young players, it ought to be more robustly blogged.

Bye.

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Mukul Kesavan is a writer based in New Delhi

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Posted by arnab on (November 17, 2008, 4:22 GMT)

Respected Mr Mukul Kesavan,

I am from Canada visiting Kolkata to see my parents.I have read about you as a academic and journalist and your knowledge about South East Asia on global political upbringing on socio economic values on times website. I would like to hear you on the Telegraph debate on November 22, 2008 at 6.30 pm at Saturday Club and enrich myself on media and social values concerning our lives an culture. I shall ever remain grateful if u could kindly please organise an entry pass / invitation card so that i have an opportunity to listen to your deliberations.

Regards

Arnab

Posted by souvik on (April 18, 2008, 5:29 GMT)

I don't know what saddened me more ..... not seeing a single post from you on the India SA test series or doing the google search to land on this post. I haven't agreed with you on a number of things and certainly haven't enjoyed when you failed to respond to legitimate criticism of Laxman. But you carried water for Indian cricket more than you will ever know. The post rebutting Andrew whatsisname's claim on why the Englishman would make a better ICC chairman than Pawar has to rank as top of the tops for its sheer political strength .... although in style and content, the one on India's '83 triumph was probably the best. There were many other gems like how Sreesanth must learn to say sorry the right way ... a beautiful expose' of western double standards ... something Gavaskar does as well but not half as eloquently as you. I do wish you will reconsider and blog again. If not here then elsewhere. I wish you all the best for the future .... hail to India's Peter Roebuck! :-)

Posted by Sunil on (April 1, 2008, 22:42 GMT)

A few posters have commented about Rakesh's post. I don't understand how what Rakesh has said is worse than Mukul's comments - to me, the college comment and the comment about Arsenal brutes are horrific

Posted by Amir on (March 29, 2008, 23:33 GMT)

Somebody posted the following: "I personally think Test cricket is glorified more than its due. Its a bi-product of boredom underwent by some cranky old English men in 15th century. Torturing oneself for 5 days for a draw is not worth it. Sportsmen give their physical and emotional best during a confrontation and they thrive on the reckoning that comes at the end. There is no worse disgrace than finding equals in opponents knowin you gave your best shot. Beat 'em. Or get beaten. The best part of sport is the pressure exerted by time deadlines, for the viewers and players themselves. Survival is not a charm. Hunting is. Shorter form of the game gives that chance and sure it should be best form for all the reasons i quoted above, more so for the market it generates. The SA-India Chennai test surely proves this. It seems the better a player plays in cricket the greater the chance of a draw, unlike any other sport. Sehwag's innings was such a waste. Good riddance, Test Cricket.

Posted by Himank on (March 29, 2008, 17:29 GMT)

I got used to reading ur views of cricket over the last year. It will be strange to see Cricinfo without your posts churning out. It was a welcome sight to see a post on Men in White whenevr it came. i will sure miss your posts

Posted by Dilip Kumar on (March 29, 2008, 11:14 GMT)

Come on Kesavan, face it. Even cricketers don't like cricket. Even Tendulkar does not like Test cricket. Also check what Viv Richards, Curtley Ambrose, Ian Botham etc have to say about cricket. It rankles, doesn't it?

Posted by Ashok Durai on (March 27, 2008, 19:52 GMT)

Kesavan, you have shown your typical Indian biases and elitism - Aussie bashing, the college comment, the Man U and Arsenal brutes. I believe a writer should be free of such prejudices.

Posted by fanof13 on (March 27, 2008, 14:35 GMT)

Good luck Mukul - enjoyed your blogs. More often than not, agreed with your views.. possibly because I am a fan of test cricket, and that of VVS. Will miss your blog. Fare well mate.

Re: "college" comment Much has been said about this in the comments. The problem seems to be that we are reading/writing in a language that is not our mother tongue. Salim Tyrewala's comments come closest to explaining what Mukul intended to say. At no point in that blog was he bashing Sachin - he was only contemplating the changing cricket scenario..

Posted by Madan Pillutla on (March 27, 2008, 14:20 GMT)

Mukul: I found all your posts to be of extraordinary quality. Thank you for taking the time to share your talent with us. Good luck on future projects!

Posted by Cricket Lover on (March 27, 2008, 9:15 GMT)

Mukul, what a great job you done......! Thanks & Bye We miss you....

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mukul Kesavan
Mukul Kesavan teaches social history for a living and writes fiction when he can - he is the author of a novel, Looking Through Glass. He's keen on the game but in a non-playing way. With a top score of 14 in neighbourhood cricket and a lively distaste for fast bowling, his credentials for writing about the game are founded on a spectatorial axiom: distance brings perspective. Kesavan's book of cricket - Men in Whitewas published in 2007.

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