November 11, 2009

Tanzania

New ground in Tanzania

Martin Williamson

The Tanzania Cricket Association has announced it will be building a new ground in the northern town of Arusha, roughly 400 miles north of Dar-es-Salaam

The ground will have an astroturf/concrete pitch and a pavilion and will be ready for use in February 2010.

A board statement said: “The new ground in place will also give TCA … an opportunity to host regional and other international events at an optional venue in Tanzania.”

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Martin Williamson is executive editor of ESPNcricinfo and managing editor of ESPN Digital Media in Europe, the Middle East and Africa

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Posted by Chris on (March 23, 2010, 8:29 GMT)

Colin,

I think it would slot in even more nicely with plans for an East African federation. To my knowledge those plans have not yet been scrapped and the timeframe envisages some kind of federation by 2015. At the moment the East African Community is headquartered in Arusha and I suspect any future Federation would have it's capital there.

So a cricket ground at Arusha could present an venue for the headquarters of an East African board in the future.

Posted by colin macbeth on (November 12, 2009, 18:50 GMT)

Will this tie in, I wonder, with embryonic plans for East Africa to set up a proper provincial-style contest, like Zimbabwe's Logan Cup, so that players get experience of 3/4-day cricket? Kenya could provide three 'provinces', Uganda arguably two, and a ground at Arusha would slot in very nicely as Tanzania's contribution, being easily accessible to both of its northern neighbours. Just an idea...

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Martin Williamson
Executive editor Martin Williamson joined the Wisden website in its planning stages in 2001 after failing to make his millions in the internet boom when managing editor of Sportal. Before that he was in charge of Sky Sports Online and helped launch and run Sky News Online. With a preference for all things old (except his wife and children), he has recently confounded colleagues by displaying an uncharacteristic fondness for Twenty20 cricket. His enthusiasm for the game is sadly not matched by his ability, but he remains convinced that he might be a late developer and perseveres in the hope of an England call-up with his middle-order batting and non-spinning offbreaks. He is now managing editor of ESPN EMEA Digital Group as well as his Cricinfo responsibilities.

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