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September 14, 2011

Test-series performances: the top allrounders

Anantha Narayanan
Garry Sobers: 722 runs and 20 wickets in a five-match series  © PA Photos
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Last month I had embarked on a major project. This had been triggered by a few comments on performance of allrounders in series. Finally after covering the batsmen, bowlers and teams, I have covered the allrounders in Test series, the idea I started with. This concludes the current series of articles but there are some very good follow-up ideas, especially relating to the teams analysis which will be done later.

I am aware that Cricinfo statistics section gives you an insight into the runs scored and wickets captured in Test series. However those are raw numbers and also do not show the results by series types. Even Statsguru might not provide that. What I intend to do is to weight the individual player performances in series with various relevant parameters. It is necessary to recognize where players performed (home or away), how did the performance measure against those of the other bowlers, what were the quality of wickets captured, what was the quality of bowlers, what was the pitch condition, was there a critical series situation et al. That would let us judge performances at their true worth.

The weight basis is the same as has been done in the batting and bowling analyses. The relevant factors considered is given below in summary form. I do not want to repeat the details here.

Batting - Runs scored
1. Where the series was played
2. Series situation
3. Quality of bowling
4. Pitch type
5. Support provided / % of score

Bowling - Wickets captured 1. Where the series was played 2. Series situation 3. Quality of wickets captured 4. Pitch type 5. Bowler's average vs Teams' series average


The key to the all-rounder analysis is in setting the criteria for selection as an all-round performance. Independent bars have to be set up for batting and bowling. These bars cannot be too high: Very few performances would come in. These bars cannot be too close to the ground: Batsmen who can bowl and bowlers who can bat would sneak in. I have arrived at the following criteria after a few trials.

No of Tests Minimum runs Minimum wickets 3 200 10 4 250 12 5 300 14 6 350 16


This stiff set of criteria let in only 60 series-level performances making this quite an exclusive and privileged group. That is the purpose behind the exercise also.

Acknowledging the importance of wicketkeepers in a side and the prevailing conviction that wicket-keepers are allrounders, I have done a set of tables for wicketkeepers at the end.

Since we need to consider runs and wickets captured together, I have used 30 runs per wicket as a rough conversion factor to work out a common Run index. The overall 135-year average is just short of 30.0. I debated using the series RpW figure. However this figure has already been used in determining the Pitch type and I did not want double counting of this. Already steps have been taken to see that, if the RpW was high, the runs would discounted and wickets inflated and vice versa. So I have used a standard measure for conversion across. This conversion is necessary to determine the average contribution per match, of players across the series. One table is drawn based on this.

Readers would note that this average is not used in setting up the criteria for selection. These are two different factors. The criteria have been set using ball-park figures and my judgement while the equalization methodology of determining the Run index requires a more objective basis.

This time I have used the actual number of Tests played while determining the average performances. Only series which a player has played a minimum of 3 Tests have been included in this analysis. Also, the three Triangular tournaments, the 1912 one and the two Asian Championships are not included. This is because these are not bi-lateral series.

The tables are shown for 6, 5, 4 and 3 test series. These are ordered on the base information, which is the Run index.

Ser Year Hme-Awy Player          For  #-P RunIdx  Avge   R  W  Wt-R  Wt-W

232 1981 ENG-Aus Botham I.T (Eng) 6-6 1397.0 232.8 399 34 457.2 31.33 234 1981 IND-Eng Botham I.T (Eng) 6-6 1081.4 180.2 440 17 503.7 19.26 190 1974 AUS-Eng Greig A.W (Eng) 6-6 1063.3 177.2 446 17 532.3 17.70 ... 152 1966 ENG-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 5-5 1474.0 294.8 722 20 840.2 21.13 18 1894 AUS-Eng Giffen G (Aus) 5-5 1454.6 290.9 475 34 541.3 30.44 185 1974 WIN-Eng Greig A.W (Eng) 5-5 1319.2 263.8 430 24 476.5 28.09 33 1910 SAF-Eng Faulkner G.A (Saf) 5-5 1317.7 263.5 545 29 552.5 25.51 113 1957 SAF-Aus Benaud R (Aus) 5-5 1268.2 253.6 329 30 408.9 28.64 526 2005 ENG-Aus Flintoff A (Eng) 5-5 1178.1 235.6 402 24 421.1 25.23 103 1955 WIN-Aus Miller K.R (Aus) 5-5 1175.8 235.2 439 20 469.6 23.54 161 1968 AUS-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 5-5 1169.7 233.9 497 18 551.9 20.59 38 1920 AUS-Eng Gregory J.M (Aus) 5-5 1142.4 228.5 442 23 415.6 24.23 131 1962 WIN-Ind Sobers G.St.A (Win) 5-5 1084.7 216.9 424 23 412.3 22.41 135 1963 ENG-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 5-5 1073.5 214.7 322 20 379.4 23.14 126 1960 AUS-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 5-5 1071.8 214.4 430 15 525.4 18.21 ... 76 1947 ENG-Saf Edrich W.J (Eng) 5-4 994.5 248.6 552 16 501.8 16.42 248 1983 ENG-Nzl Hadlee R.J (Nzl) 4-4 993.4 248.4 301 21 367.5 20.86 157 1967 AUS-Ind Surti R.F (Ind) 4-4 885.1 221.3 367 15 377.5 16.92 157 1967 AUS-Ind Cowper R.M (Aus) 4-4 866.6 216.7 485 13 479.2 12.92 106 1955 IND-Nzl Mankad M.H (Ind) 5-4 858.1 214.5 526 12 506.5 11.72 443 2001 WIN-Saf Pollock S.M (Saf) 4-4 849.8 212.4 285 19 313.7 17.87 507 2004 ENG-Win Flintoff A (Eng) 4-4 802.2 200.6 387 14 384.6 13.92 ... 240 1982 ENG-Pak Imran Khan (Pak) 3-3 912.7 304.2 212 21 250.3 22.08 582 2009 SAF-Aus Johnson M.G (Aus) 3-3 829.2 276.4 255 16 295.0 17.80 153 1966 IND-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 3-3 797.5 265.8 342 14 370.6 14.23 208 1978 NZL-Eng Botham I.T (Eng) 3-3 734.8 244.9 212 17 239.8 16.50 40 1921 SAF-Aus Gregory J.M (Aus) 3-3 718.9 239.6 205 15 229.0 16.33 181 1973 PAK-Eng Mushtaq Mohd (Pak) 3-3 713.2 237.7 327 12 341.6 12.39 156 1967 ENG-Pak Asif Iqbal (Pak) 3-3 705.5 235.2 267 11 313.8 13.06 181 1973 PAK-Eng Intikhab Alam (Pak) 3-3 704.0 234.7 202 15 200.5 16.78


Botham leads the 6-Test series. In the 5-test series, Sobers' once-in-a-100-years performance of 722 runs and 20 wickets leads the way. Giffen, with 475 runs and 34 wickets, is just behind. Look at the number of times Sobers has appeared in the 5-test table.

Bill Edrich, with 552 runs and 16 wickets is a surprise leader in the 4-test group. However look at the performance of Imran Khan in the series against England. 212 runs and 21 wickets. Johnson is a surprise presence here, however, 255 runs and 16 wickets indicating a real allrounder. It is also interesting to note that 4 out of the 8 players in the 3-Test category are Pakistani players.

Now for the second table, a completely performance-based one. This is ordered on the average Run index per match. In other words, consider as approximately equivalent to the number of runs scored per match. To understand the significance a Run index average of 200 indicates 1000 runs in a series, a figure not yet reached.

Ser Year Hme-Awy Player          For  #-P RunIdx  Avge   R  W  Wt-R  Wt-W

240 1982 ENG-Pak Imran Khan (Pak) 3-3 912.7 304.2 212 21 250.3 22.08 152 1966 ENG-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 5-5 1474.0 294.8 722 20 840.2 21.13 18 1894 AUS-Eng Giffen G (Aus) 5-5 1454.6 290.9 475 34 541.3 30.44 582 2009 SAF-Aus Johnson M.G (Aus) 3-3 829.2 276.4 255 16 295.0 17.80 153 1966 IND-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 3-3 797.5 265.8 342 14 370.6 14.23 185 1974 WIN-Eng Greig A.W (Eng) 5-5 1319.2 263.8 430 24 476.5 28.09 33 1910 SAF-Eng Faulkner G.A (Saf) 5-5 1317.7 263.5 545 29 552.5 25.51 113 1957 SAF-Aus Benaud R (Aus) 5-5 1268.2 253.6 329 30 408.9 28.64 76 1947 ENG-Saf Edrich W.J (Eng) 5-4 994.5 248.6 552 16 501.8 16.42 248 1983 ENG-Nzl Hadlee R.J (Nzl) 4-4 993.4 248.4 301 21 367.5 20.86 208 1978 NZL-Eng Botham I.T (Eng) 3-3 734.8 244.9 212 17 239.8 16.50 40 1921 SAF-Aus Gregory J.M (Aus) 3-3 718.9 239.6 205 15 229.0 16.33 181 1973 PAK-Eng Mushtaq Mohd (Pak) 3-3 713.2 237.7 327 12 341.6 12.39 526 2005 ENG-Aus Flintoff A (Eng) 5-5 1178.1 235.6 402 24 421.1 25.23 103 1955 WIN-Aus Miller K.R (Aus) 5-5 1175.8 235.2 439 20 469.6 23.54 156 1967 ENG-Pak Asif Iqbal (Pak) 3-3 705.5 235.2 267 11 313.8 13.06 181 1973 PAK-Eng Intikhab Alam (Pak) 3-3 704.0 234.7 202 15 200.5 16.78 161 1968 AUS-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 5-5 1169.7 233.9 497 18 551.9 20.59 232 1981 ENG-Aus Botham I.T (Eng) 6-6 1397.0 232.8 399 34 457.2 31.33 537 2006 IND-Eng Flintoff A (Eng) 3-3 693.6 231.2 264 11 302.3 13.04


Imran Khan, with a Run index value of 304, stop for a moment to digest this figure, 300+ runs per Test, leads this performance-oriented table. Sobers' stupendous series during 1966 follows closely with a near-300 figure. Giffen has also got a Run index value exceeding 290. How about Johnson going through a 3-test series averaging 276 runs per test.

Just to complete the Series bowling analysis, I have given below the table of allrounders who have met the tough criteria set. This is a clear indication of the quality of allrounders. Very few would be surprised at the results. Sobers leads with 6 such performances, indicating that he is the supreme allrounder. Botham, five times, Miller and Flintoff, possibly unexpectedly, four times each, confirm their claim to greatness. Surprises, Kapil Dev just once and the presence of Johnson and Harbhajan Singh.

Sobers:     6
Botham:     5
Miller:     4
Flintoff:   4
on 2, plenty (J.M.Gregory, Imran Khan, Hadlee, Greig, Kallis).

On this strong evidence, there is very little doubt that Sobers is the supreme allrounder. Botham has also performed the all-round feats in series quite often. Miller, not surprisingly, and Flintoff, quite surprisingly, have reached the lofted heights four times each.

To download the complete list of players who have crossed 500 runs in a Test series, please right-click here and save the file.

Now for the allrounders hall of fame (or more correctly, shame). While I sympathise with these players, I like this part of the exercise since it throws a challenge to me to identify such performances. The only criteria I have set is that the concerned player should have captured 100 Test wickets and scored 2000 Test runs. This is to ensure that the list contains only regular allrounders.

Ser Year Hme-Awy Player          For  #-P RunIdx  Avge   R  W

302 1990 WIN-Eng Hooper C.L (Win) 4-3 67.1 16.8 71 0 96 1953 ENG-Aus Benaud R (Aus) 5-3 89.9 18.0 15 2 99 1954 ENG-Pak Bailey T.E (Eng) 4-3 106.0 26.5 81 1 296 1989 ENG-Aus Botham I.T (Eng) 6-3 163.3 27.2 62 3 322 1992 SAF-Ind Shastri R.J (Ind) 4-3 124.0 31.0 59 2 107 1956 NZL-Win Sobers G.St.A (Win) 4-4 138.9 34.7 81 2


Sobers and Botham are arguably the top two allrounders ever. However they had nightmare series. The above players scored less than 30 runs per Test and captured fewer than one wicket per Test. Their average Run index was less than 35, in eminently forgettable series for all. However, let us not forget that Sobers and Botham are the top two allrounders in the performance table.

The minimum number of wicket-keeper dismissals has been set at a slightly higher level than the wickets (12/14/16/18). The wicket-keeping allrounder table is ordered on the Run index, which is determined by assigning a value of 20 runs per dismissal. This has been done with some basis. 26 is the highest number of dismissals in this group and 600 runs. Hence the number 20 has been chosen. In case you think that this is arbitrarily done, it is true. However do not forget that it is the same for all wicket-keepers and we are not comparing outside the wicket-keeper domain.

Ser Year Hme-Awy Player          For  #-P RunIdx  Avge   R  D  Wt-R

463 2002 SAF-Aus Gilchrist A.C (Aus) 3-3 829.7 276.6 473 14 549.7 418 1999 ZIM-Slk Flower A (Zim) 3-3 679.5 226.5 388 13 419.5 154 1966 SAF-Aus Lindsay D.T (Saf) 5-5 1083.9 216.8 606 24 603.9 377 1997 NZL-Eng Stewart A.J (Eng) 3-3 605.9 202.0 257 16 285.9 350 1994 SAF-Nzl Richardson D.J (Saf) 3-3 571.8 190.6 247 16 251.8 399 1998 ENG-Saf Stewart A.J (Eng) 5-5 943.7 188.7 465 23 483.7 591 2009 NZL-Pak Kamran Akmal (Pak) 3-3 561.3 187.1 257 13 301.3 447 2001 ENG-Aus Gilchrist A.C (Aus) 5-5 924.1 184.8 340 26 404.1 416 1999 AUS-Pak Gilchrist A.C (Aus) 3-3 537.4 179.1 264 13 277.4 499 2004 SLK-Aus Gilchrist A.C (Aus) 3-3 527.7 175.9 201 14 247.7 126 1960 AUS-Win Alexander F.C.M(Win) 5-5 877.4 175.5 484 16 557.4 443 2001 WIN-Saf Jacobs R.D (Win) 4-4 698.4 174.6 299 17 358.4 178 1972 AUS-Pak Marsh R.W (Aus) 3-3 517.3 172.4 210 16 197.3 515 2004 AUS-Pak Gilchrist A.C (Aus) 3-3 505.6 168.5 230 14 225.6 475 2002 AUS-Eng Gilchrist A.C (Aus) 5-5 830.3 166.1 333 25 330.3 565 2008 NZL-Eng McCullum B.B (Nzl) 3-3 495.1 165.0 212 14 215.1 593 2009 SAF-Eng Boucher M.V (Saf) 4-4 655.1 163.8 341 16 335.1 439 2001 SLK-Eng Sangakkara K.C (Slk) 3-3 484.9 161.6 215 13 224.9 592 2009 AUS-Win Haddin B.J (Aus) 3-3 479.1 159.7 225 14 199.1 259 1984 AUS-Win Dujon P.J.L (Win) 5-5 781.9 156.4 341 19 401.9 615 2011 ENG-Ind Prior M.J (Eng) 4-4 610.9 152.7 271 17 270.9 404 1998 SAF-Win Jacobs R.D (Win) 5-5 763.0 152.6 317 19 383.0 190 1974 AUS-Eng Knott A.P.E (Eng) 6-6 908.0 151.3 364 23 448.0 289 1988 ENG-Win Dujon P.J.L (Win) 5-5 749.2 149.8 305 20 349.2 587 2009 ENG-Aus Haddin B.J (Aus) 5-4 598.9 149.7 278 15 298.9 481 2003 WIN-Aus Gilchrist A.C (Aus) 4-4 583.2 145.8 282 15 283.2


Look at Gilchrist's 2002 series against South Africa. In 3 Tests, Gilchrist scored 473 runs (this is a performance Bradman would have been proud of) being weighted into 549 runs, away against top quality bowling. He dismissed 14 batsmen, this working out to 280 runs. The total is 829 equivalent runs, averaging 276 runs per Test. One would be at a loss of words to describe this performance.

Andy Flower was equally impressive against Sri Lanka. Playing for a weaker team, he scored just a few runs fewer and almost the same number of dismissals. An average Run index of 226 is ample proof of Andy Flower's contribution in a decent series for Zimbabwe.

Dennis Lindsay's performance in the South African series against Australia has been discussed quite a lot during the Series Batting analysis discussions. 606 runs and 24 dismissals must rank amongst the most impressive all-round performances ever, bowling or wicket-keeping type.

No Indian wicket-keeper has met the criteria set indicating the lack of wicket-keeper-batsmen amongst the Indian players.

Now for the wicket-keepers who have cleared the bar a number of times.

Gilchrist:    7
Stewart:      2
Dujon:        2
Jacobs:       2
Haddin:       2
1 (10 keepers have reached this once each).

The above table tells a story, loud and clear. Gilchrist has achieved the selected landmarks in seven series. Four other keepers, twice. For those who compare Dhoni and Gilchrist, I would like to point out that Dhoni has not reached the set target even once. At least Prior, Akmal, McCullum, Boucher, Haddin, Sangakkara amongst modern keepers have got at least one successful jump over the bar.


I would conclude saying that, as wicket-keeper allrounders go, Gilchrist is as far ahead of the rest of the field as Bradman was, of the next batsmen.

The Readers' list

This is not a merit list since I have not come out with my list. This is just a list of all-rounders who missed the cut. Please check the downloaded file before sending an entry. Also please send the complete series figures for me to consider inclusion.

1. Warne's 249 runs and 40 wickets during 2005 vs England, away (Boll/Raghav).
2. Davidson's 212 runs and 33 wickets during 1960 vs West Indies (Waspsting).
3. Marshall's 244 runs and 33 wickets during 1983 vs India, away (Ravi).
4. Botham's 187 runs and 19 wkts in 3 tests during 1979 vs Aus away (Gerry).
5. Kapil's 278 runs and 32 wkts vs Pak during 1979 (Ganesh).
6. Noble's 417 runs and 16 wkts vs Eng during 1903 (Boll).
7. Healy's 356 runs and 15 dismissals vs Win in 1996-97 (Boll).
8. Marsh's 297 runs and 17 dismissals vs Win in 1972-73, away (Boll).
9. Procter's 209 runs and 28 wickets, in 4 Tests, vs Aus during 1970 (Blakeley).

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Anantha Narayanan has written for ESPNcricinfo and CastrolCricket and worked with a number of companies on their cricket performance ratings-related systems

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Keywords: Allrounders, Stats

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Posted by Darren Lucas on (November 26, 2011, 12:05 GMT)

Hello, not related to article, just musing... was wondering about a rating system for allrounders... take every player as an allrounder... rate the batting, bowling, fielding across all in groups as you have done so well and then use that score weighted (ah there is the rub!) anyway... say average batting score is 28, allrounder x's score is 35 so = +7, the bowling score across the group is 28 say, but allrounder x'x is 35 = -7 so they rate 0, then add the fielding depending how it is scored... say they score 26 and avg across group is say 28 they are -2 overall (for an average allrounder as an example) i will try and play with your lists to see if i can crystalize this idea somewhat [[ So much time has passed that I have to do some work before relating to this comment. Will do. Ananth: ]]

oh and i think the comment on Chris Cairns is deserved, he was as good as Flintoff for example, with that fierce determination to take hold of the game no matter what the scoreline might say despite not the best looking stats he was always tough on the Aussies (when fit) during a strong period for them

Posted by RANGArajan on (October 31, 2011, 6:58 GMT)

A pretty late entry but suddenly remembered about a forgotten allrounder - Chris Cairns: One of the last few greates who never achieved what he should have. [[ If you go back to the BCG charts, Cairns stands quite tall there. Ananth: ]]

From a nation of under-achievers, Cairns stood out with both bat and ball (fielding for NZ is a hygiene factor - Boycott's mom from NZ would match our best fielders in the world) . . . His records are comparable to the best in business and has done well when it matters . . . Of course, injuries did hamper his bowling after 2005, but he still has close to 3.5 wkts per test which is what some leading bowlers managed to, during their entire careers (And he has an entry into this list as well) . . . He deserves a bit more accolades than he actually managed to get in the end

Posted by Boll on (September 30, 2011, 13:35 GMT)

Based on the bat ave/bowl ave. ratio , here are the Top 10, qualification 1000runs/100wickets

1. Kallis 1.79 2. Sobers 1.70 3. Imran 1.65 4. Miller 1.61 5. Pollock 1.40 6. Goddard 1.31 7. Greig 1.26 8. Hadlee 1.22 9. Noble 1.21 10. Botham 1.18

Posted by Gerry_the_Merry on (September 30, 2011, 4:00 GMT)

Boll - On all rounders against Windies: surprise again - Kapil shone less with the bat than i thought, and more with the ball.In the period 1979-1989 (full strength Windies only, not Kalli's teams)

Name; tests; runs / test; batting avg; wickets/test; bowl avg Kapil; 19; 39.5; 25.21; 3.8; 22.98 Botham; 19; 39.8; 21.02; 3.1; 35.84 Hadlee; 10; 38.9; 32.41; 5.1; 22.03 Imran; 10; 40.9; 27.26; 5.1; 16.68

So barring Botham, the other three all gave a hard time to the West Indies. Hadlee and Imran clearly raised their game against the best of the best...

Posted by Boll on (September 29, 2011, 13:08 GMT)

@shrikanthk. Yep, obviously the batting average-bowling average metric is a fairly crude instrument, and I would agree with Ananth that the ratio is a fairer, although far from foolproof, measure.

Posted by Mark on (September 28, 2011, 13:52 GMT)

-All-Rounder Qualifications- Post 1920; :Min. of 15 Games played :Must have played Home & Away

Batting top5 :Must’ve Bowled in 75% of Matches played. :Bowl Ave. Less than 45 + Min. 0.5 Wkt per Match. :Runs per Test Innings Greater than 40 Ave.

Batting 6 :Must’ve Bowled in 90% of Matches played. :Bowl Ave. Less than 40 + Min. 1 Wkt per Match. :Runs per Test Innings Greater than 33 Ave.

Batting 7or8 :Must’ve Bowled in no. 150% of the no. of Matches played. :Bowl Ave. Less than 35 + Min. 2 Wkts?per Match. :Runs per Test Match Greater than 30.

Posted by arch on (September 27, 2011, 14:25 GMT)

Pollock: poor man's Proctor. Now that was a player! Too bad we will never know exactly how great he was.

Posted by RANGArajan on (September 27, 2011, 8:02 GMT)

Due apologies and thanks for the correction!!! My expression (Poor Man's Flintoff) typifies the recognition received by SAF cricketers!! They have beaten all teams in their backyards but yet, were never considered as world beaters / all time great teams!!!

One most important aspect of Pollock is his aggression not crossing the line - The way he conducted himself with decorum, befitting the great man he was. Interestingly, he still has an entry into this list just once.

Posted by RANGArajan on (September 27, 2011, 6:11 GMT)

@ Boll . . . Interesting point to be noted - People have spoken a lot about Kallis but have forgotten his fellow South African, Shaun Pollock. Apart from the excellent batting / bowling record, he has also captained SAF in 26 tests, winning 14, with a success rate of over 50% . . . Like most of his fellow South Africans, he has not received his due.

South Africans have produced excellent match winners, but none of them have hogged the limelight as much as occasional performers (Like Ind & Eng.

Pollock may not quite belong to the Flintoff league, but he is a poor man's Flintoff (and a more consistent bowler. And he definitely did not have the hero worship of Freddie/Kapil, but in the end he achieved as much (or even more). He also took captaincy well, till infamous WC2003 debacle.

To me, he may not be a legend, but definitely an ALL TIME GREAT [[ Poor man's Flintoff. No, sir. He was a poor man's Botham. He and Flintoff could both lay claim to that sobriquet. Now, Broad may be a poor man's Flintoff. Ananth: ]]

Posted by Mark on (September 27, 2011, 3:51 GMT)

My Post that was sent prev. was not received correctly, I used all 1000 char. it, maybe, was the problem... O.K. -3 Criteria, for the 3 Types of A/R's being.... the "top5" batting A/R; 1/ RPI's > than 40, 2/ Bowled in 75% of matches played, 3/ Bowl ave. < than 45 + Min. 0.5 Wkt per match.... the "6" genuine A/R; 1/ RPI's > than 33, 2/ Bowled in 90% of matches played, 3/ Bowl ave. < than 40 + Min. 1 Wkt per match.... the "7or8" bowling A/R; 1/ RPM > than 30, 2/ Bowled in 150% of matches played, 3/ Bowl ave. < than 35 + Min. 2 Wkt per match.... -I hope that this analysis or something along this line, will uncover more than the usual suspects!

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anantha Narayanan
Anantha spent the first half of his four-decade working career with corporates like IBM, Shaw Wallace, NCR, Sime Darby and the Spinneys group in IT-related positions. In the second half, he has worked on cricket simulation, ratings, data mining, analysis and writing, amongst other things. He was the creator of the Wisden 100 lists, released in 2001. He has written for ESPNcricinfo and CastrolCricket, and worked extensively with Maruti Motors, Idea Cellular and Castrol on their performance ratings-related systems. He is an armchair connoisseur of most sports. His other passion is tennis, and he thinks Roger Federer is the greatest sportsman to have walked on earth.

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