Australia news August 17, 2013

Ponting sees potential in Australia's team

Renaldo Matadeen
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Ricky Ponting sees potential in the current Australia team, despite their disappointing Ashes against England. Ponting believes that there have been spots of brightness from time to time, but admitted that England were the dominant side.

"I have kept in touch with it [the Ashes] and putting my biased goggles on for a minute, I think the boys have probably played a little bit better than the scoreline suggests as they have been in with a chance of winning three Tests," Ponting, who is on duty with the Antigua Hawksbills in the Caribbean Premier League, said. "But the scoreline reads 3-0 and that is the difference sometimes between the really good and experienced teams, and the ones on their way up... the know-how to actually get across the line and to win games.

"England have got a really good team, an experienced team and their bowling group has been together for pretty much the last six or seven years now."

Australia have much to learn still, but they are headed in the right direction, he said. "There are some challenges there for Australia cricket but with Darren Lehmann's appointment as coach and some of the younger guys they have got around there I think there is enough talent but they are just going to have to learn and at the moment they are learning the hard way."

Ponting will be in the commentary box this Australian summer, covering the Big Bash League, but he also sees himself staying within the game in a more hands-on approach. "There is no doubt I will stay in the game somewhere. There will be some coaching offers that will come my way and I am really interested in coaching. I'm really interested in helping out younger players," he said. He was confident that he had a lot left to offer the breeding grounds of Australian cricket.

"The state Australian cricket is at, at the moment, my services could be used in some way. We will just wait and see, but the one thing I do not want to do is to travel around the world for six or eight months a year."

Renaldo Matadeen is a sportswriter and social media manager for ESPN Caribbean. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY KPWij on | August 23, 2013, 2:22 GMT

    It is true that Australia are not getting the results they would like from the series, but looking at it on a game by game basis it is by no means a disaster. The first test Australia probably should have won, they were behind for large periods but if it weren't for some Jimmy Anderson heroics, Australia would have probably won. The second test sure enough England brought along their A-game and Australia played poorly. The third-test, Australia was clearly the better side and if it were not for the inconvenient weather that game would have been Australia's. The fourth-test again was a very tight affair that England snatched in a brutal Broad barrage late on the fourth day. If a couple of things went Australia's way, the team may have been bringing home the Ashes. However I do agree that Australia is rebuilding and the recent selection decisions and lack of trust and backing of talent is a concern that management will have to deal with in the future. 3-0 flatters England....

  • POSTED BY ScottStevo on | August 20, 2013, 21:28 GMT

    @Steve Back, what do 300 plus totals have anything to do with how these teams are matched? Actually, I think these 2 teams are reasonably close and this series has proved that in that Aus have had major opportunities to win 3 out of the 4 tests. Also, it's been one guy scoring all of your runs and your top order has generally failed and been 3 for not many more times than not. A few, let's say favourable decisions, going the way of some in the middle order, ie Bell, have allowed Eng to make up those runs when they looked far from doing so. You discuss your recent win in India as a measuring stick, then state SA have the best bowling depth, yet Aus competed (and should've at worst drawn) in our series vs SA whereas Eng were slammed into the turf. A few decisions here and there at crucial times and Aus could well have won the first, a lot less rain and Aus win the third. In the 2nd & 4th Aus batting collapses cost us rather than Eng's good play...so yes, they are closer than 3-0 suggests

  • POSTED BY Samdanh on | August 19, 2013, 6:07 GMT

    But for more marginal umpire calls and the greatest howler of recent times which went against Aus, and the weather in Old Trafford depriving them of a victory, the scoreline could have been 2-2. I agree with Ponting. Aus should put their chin up and continue to strive hard. Victories may be far or fewer. But the team seems to be on right track. Couple of personnel changes in batting could enhance Aus strength in the longer run

  • POSTED BY Whatsgoinoffoutthere on | August 18, 2013, 10:07 GMT

    Regarding DRS. If you don't want to be LBW, hit the ball.

    However, I get the feeling that the players aren't impressed with the umpires' abilities and interpretations and are taking the mickey just a bit, to show up the system's deficiencies. Broad's non-dismissal, Harris walking in the middle of a review so all the umpire had to give out was an empty pitch, the whole lot of it looks to me like a bunch of people with criticisms of the system, but who know that current terms and conditions basically deny them the right to speak out without censure.

  • POSTED BY Moppa on | August 18, 2013, 9:01 GMT

    There's no great mystery here: Australia *are* closer than 3-0 would imply and England *are* comfortably the better side - so both sets of arguments from supporters are broadly correct. Australia's good moments in this series remind me a lot of the 2012-13 series vs South Africa. When Australia landed a few punches it was surprising and exciting, but they failed to land the killer blow. When South Africa hit back, they did it decisively and almost effortlessly. This is the nature of a team that is close but outmatched - they fight and create opportunities but seem to almost inevitably lose the key moments and slip away. I think people will see a real contrast when Australia next take on a team of comparable experience and ability (e.g. Sri Lanka, NZ, Pakistan) - they will feel they can win the key moments, and probably will.

  • POSTED BY on | August 18, 2013, 8:33 GMT

    @Wefinishthis, an argument can be made for having Starc and Patto in the top 6? Sorry mate, but no it can't. They are very handy batsmen coming in against an old ball, but if they are coming it at 3-50 its a different proposition. Lets try and remain realistic.

    I think this series is going to finish with us all thinking exactly what we knew beforehand anyway. Australia has a big hole in its batting, particularly on the experience side of the ledger, and pretty good bowling. England has pretty solid, experienced batting and pretty good bowling. So for the ost part we have seen an excellent battle between Aussie bowlers and English batsmen but when it comes to the Aussie batting we've seen some okay performances, flavoured with two tremendous collapses. And that my friends is that. Perhaps time and experience will bring some of our so so bats like Warner and Hughes up to scratch or perhaps it won't and we'll have to wait for the next round of batsmen to come through.

  • POSTED BY riahcmra on | August 18, 2013, 8:15 GMT

    England has a good team but ... my worry is the death of strokeplayers did anyone see the Hawkeye prediction of LBW for Warner 1/2 way down the pitch and the ball landed 6 inches in front of his pad. Hawkeye was saying he was out ... England didn't appeal against the umpire's not out .. but ... thats ridiculous and leg stump LBWs ... ridiculous ... clipping the outside of leg stump ... how is a batsmen supposed to bat? 1 foot wide of leg stump ? what I'm saying is ... the nudgers and deflectors are doing best ... Bell ... Rogers DRS will kill strokeplayers the way things are going ... get ready for minimal backlifts and boring batting .... I originally thought DRS was good ... but it has to go a bunch of geeks are destroying strokeplaying ... I say kill it before it kills cricket

  • POSTED BY TomPrice on | August 18, 2013, 7:53 GMT

    It's not enough to be in with a chance, as England fans know very well. Plenty of hard road ahead for Australia. It must be shocking for everybody to realize how dependent the side has been on Hussey these last few years. Mickey Arthur was left with no trousers on, Clarke was scrambling to rewrite his legacy before the series even began. 3-0 is not even half the story. Try 7 defeats out of 8 and staring down the barrel.

  • POSTED BY Greatest_Game on | August 18, 2013, 7:17 GMT

    The teams are close to even. Close, but not quite. The series has been dominated, and won, by Ian Bell. 500 runs, an average of 71.42, 3 centuries, 2 fifties. Eng's next best, Root, has an ave just over HALF of Bell's. Clarke at 49.42 & Rogers at 43, have each made tons, but are still 20 behind Bell's ave, & he has 3 tons. The only match Eng did not lose, Bell did not go big.

    The teams are close, except for Bell who is in another league. Give credit where credit is due:

  • POSTED BY hyclass on | August 18, 2013, 2:50 GMT

    What value is there in looking at the scores, when the underlying malaise causing all disfunctionality within the Australian cricket system continues to fester away unchecked? M.Hussey described how he was forced by CA, along with Bollinger to play the T20 finals in India. He mentioned how, with the age myth they were propagating, that he felt his lack of preparation for the Test series might end his career and how it led to his earlier retirement. Bollinger played the finals, flew straight to a Shield match in WA and then straight across to the Test match. At that point, with exhaustion being a factor, he was summarily dismissed by a well orchestrated campaign re his fitness, that failed to name CA's complicity. Hauritz bore the brunt of being told to 'bowl like Harbajan' by Ponting on a tour of India and never recovered his own game. DeCosta cites Hughes,'being forced to prepare in a way that was unsuited to his game.'on joining the '09 Ashes squad.Another player who hasnt recovered.

  • POSTED BY KPWij on | August 23, 2013, 2:22 GMT

    It is true that Australia are not getting the results they would like from the series, but looking at it on a game by game basis it is by no means a disaster. The first test Australia probably should have won, they were behind for large periods but if it weren't for some Jimmy Anderson heroics, Australia would have probably won. The second test sure enough England brought along their A-game and Australia played poorly. The third-test, Australia was clearly the better side and if it were not for the inconvenient weather that game would have been Australia's. The fourth-test again was a very tight affair that England snatched in a brutal Broad barrage late on the fourth day. If a couple of things went Australia's way, the team may have been bringing home the Ashes. However I do agree that Australia is rebuilding and the recent selection decisions and lack of trust and backing of talent is a concern that management will have to deal with in the future. 3-0 flatters England....

  • POSTED BY ScottStevo on | August 20, 2013, 21:28 GMT

    @Steve Back, what do 300 plus totals have anything to do with how these teams are matched? Actually, I think these 2 teams are reasonably close and this series has proved that in that Aus have had major opportunities to win 3 out of the 4 tests. Also, it's been one guy scoring all of your runs and your top order has generally failed and been 3 for not many more times than not. A few, let's say favourable decisions, going the way of some in the middle order, ie Bell, have allowed Eng to make up those runs when they looked far from doing so. You discuss your recent win in India as a measuring stick, then state SA have the best bowling depth, yet Aus competed (and should've at worst drawn) in our series vs SA whereas Eng were slammed into the turf. A few decisions here and there at crucial times and Aus could well have won the first, a lot less rain and Aus win the third. In the 2nd & 4th Aus batting collapses cost us rather than Eng's good play...so yes, they are closer than 3-0 suggests

  • POSTED BY Samdanh on | August 19, 2013, 6:07 GMT

    But for more marginal umpire calls and the greatest howler of recent times which went against Aus, and the weather in Old Trafford depriving them of a victory, the scoreline could have been 2-2. I agree with Ponting. Aus should put their chin up and continue to strive hard. Victories may be far or fewer. But the team seems to be on right track. Couple of personnel changes in batting could enhance Aus strength in the longer run

  • POSTED BY Whatsgoinoffoutthere on | August 18, 2013, 10:07 GMT

    Regarding DRS. If you don't want to be LBW, hit the ball.

    However, I get the feeling that the players aren't impressed with the umpires' abilities and interpretations and are taking the mickey just a bit, to show up the system's deficiencies. Broad's non-dismissal, Harris walking in the middle of a review so all the umpire had to give out was an empty pitch, the whole lot of it looks to me like a bunch of people with criticisms of the system, but who know that current terms and conditions basically deny them the right to speak out without censure.

  • POSTED BY Moppa on | August 18, 2013, 9:01 GMT

    There's no great mystery here: Australia *are* closer than 3-0 would imply and England *are* comfortably the better side - so both sets of arguments from supporters are broadly correct. Australia's good moments in this series remind me a lot of the 2012-13 series vs South Africa. When Australia landed a few punches it was surprising and exciting, but they failed to land the killer blow. When South Africa hit back, they did it decisively and almost effortlessly. This is the nature of a team that is close but outmatched - they fight and create opportunities but seem to almost inevitably lose the key moments and slip away. I think people will see a real contrast when Australia next take on a team of comparable experience and ability (e.g. Sri Lanka, NZ, Pakistan) - they will feel they can win the key moments, and probably will.

  • POSTED BY on | August 18, 2013, 8:33 GMT

    @Wefinishthis, an argument can be made for having Starc and Patto in the top 6? Sorry mate, but no it can't. They are very handy batsmen coming in against an old ball, but if they are coming it at 3-50 its a different proposition. Lets try and remain realistic.

    I think this series is going to finish with us all thinking exactly what we knew beforehand anyway. Australia has a big hole in its batting, particularly on the experience side of the ledger, and pretty good bowling. England has pretty solid, experienced batting and pretty good bowling. So for the ost part we have seen an excellent battle between Aussie bowlers and English batsmen but when it comes to the Aussie batting we've seen some okay performances, flavoured with two tremendous collapses. And that my friends is that. Perhaps time and experience will bring some of our so so bats like Warner and Hughes up to scratch or perhaps it won't and we'll have to wait for the next round of batsmen to come through.

  • POSTED BY riahcmra on | August 18, 2013, 8:15 GMT

    England has a good team but ... my worry is the death of strokeplayers did anyone see the Hawkeye prediction of LBW for Warner 1/2 way down the pitch and the ball landed 6 inches in front of his pad. Hawkeye was saying he was out ... England didn't appeal against the umpire's not out .. but ... thats ridiculous and leg stump LBWs ... ridiculous ... clipping the outside of leg stump ... how is a batsmen supposed to bat? 1 foot wide of leg stump ? what I'm saying is ... the nudgers and deflectors are doing best ... Bell ... Rogers DRS will kill strokeplayers the way things are going ... get ready for minimal backlifts and boring batting .... I originally thought DRS was good ... but it has to go a bunch of geeks are destroying strokeplaying ... I say kill it before it kills cricket

  • POSTED BY TomPrice on | August 18, 2013, 7:53 GMT

    It's not enough to be in with a chance, as England fans know very well. Plenty of hard road ahead for Australia. It must be shocking for everybody to realize how dependent the side has been on Hussey these last few years. Mickey Arthur was left with no trousers on, Clarke was scrambling to rewrite his legacy before the series even began. 3-0 is not even half the story. Try 7 defeats out of 8 and staring down the barrel.

  • POSTED BY Greatest_Game on | August 18, 2013, 7:17 GMT

    The teams are close to even. Close, but not quite. The series has been dominated, and won, by Ian Bell. 500 runs, an average of 71.42, 3 centuries, 2 fifties. Eng's next best, Root, has an ave just over HALF of Bell's. Clarke at 49.42 & Rogers at 43, have each made tons, but are still 20 behind Bell's ave, & he has 3 tons. The only match Eng did not lose, Bell did not go big.

    The teams are close, except for Bell who is in another league. Give credit where credit is due:

  • POSTED BY hyclass on | August 18, 2013, 2:50 GMT

    What value is there in looking at the scores, when the underlying malaise causing all disfunctionality within the Australian cricket system continues to fester away unchecked? M.Hussey described how he was forced by CA, along with Bollinger to play the T20 finals in India. He mentioned how, with the age myth they were propagating, that he felt his lack of preparation for the Test series might end his career and how it led to his earlier retirement. Bollinger played the finals, flew straight to a Shield match in WA and then straight across to the Test match. At that point, with exhaustion being a factor, he was summarily dismissed by a well orchestrated campaign re his fitness, that failed to name CA's complicity. Hauritz bore the brunt of being told to 'bowl like Harbajan' by Ponting on a tour of India and never recovered his own game. DeCosta cites Hughes,'being forced to prepare in a way that was unsuited to his game.'on joining the '09 Ashes squad.Another player who hasnt recovered.

  • POSTED BY hyclass on | August 18, 2013, 2:40 GMT

    It must be evident that those batsmen who had established their credentials, before the advent of 20/20 in Australian domestic cricket, are the ones providing the answers.CA issued an edict that players who would be given preference were those who could play in all three formats. It was then enforced as policy through the payment weighting system. This is the same 20/20 comp that was rushed through a year ahead of schedule, against the wishes of the States, to beat the findings of the Argus Review.Staggering that it continues to pass with little comment.As if Hayden commenting that he,'Had no investment in traditional cricket', while a CA Board member wasnt illuminating enough. Then there was the technique myth, the age over performance myth, the unsackable Nielsen and Hilditch. Imagine sub-standard players like Quiney and Marsh ahead of a Rogers or Hussey. Nothing has changed since Argus.Nothing can change while 20/20 continues to exceed traditional values & the same people in control

  • POSTED BY on | August 18, 2013, 1:36 GMT

    Steve Black: has been much closer series than the 3-0 score line would suggest.

    test 1: 15 runs in it. 'nuff said

    test 2: Eng walloped Aus.

    test 3: Aus would have walloped Eng but for a combination of bad light/rain on days 4 and 5. would probably had been as big a margin as England's Lords victory. don't forget the 170-7 Australian 2nd innings involved all their top order having to throw away their wickets in the search of quick runs. and so shouldn't be factored into the dominance level of Australia in that test. the 530-7 in the first innings spoke volumes in that, Australia finally had the best of the conditions throughout the first couple of days and made it count.

    test 4. Eng victory by 80 runs. let us not forget that England had the best of the conditions on the first two days of the match. ie. England batted first day in perfect sunshine. Australia batted day 2 in perfect bowling conditions. I think it was a very important toss to win (as the match turned out).

  • POSTED BY on | August 18, 2013, 1:09 GMT

    The closeness of some of the matches does not mean Australia don't deserve to be 3-0 down. England don't have to be winning every game by an innings to be the clearly superior team. The 14-run margin of defeat at Trent Bridge flattered Australia, and as for Durham, you can't claim any kind of moral victory when you lose 9 wickets in a session. Maybe if things had turned out differently, they would have won at Old Trafford, or maybe Ian Bell would have made a match saving hundred, or maybe Cook would have won the toss and batted first and the whole match would have turned out differently.

  • POSTED BY Broken_F-ing_Arm on | August 18, 2013, 0:50 GMT

    this is series has been a lot tighter than 3-0, England has been the slightly better team with the only difference being Ian Bell. England have had one batsmen stand up and consistently making runs, this is what got england over the line at TB and Durham. these 2 tests were identicallly played out as were the 2nd and 3rd with aus dominating the 3rd and england the 2nd, aus lost out due to rain in the 3rd whilst england had the full 5 days to clean aus up. In the 2 tight test (combined difference less than 100 runs) england managed to win due to aus phsycological scars and better conditions. if aus managed to find bell out aus probably would be winning series right now

  • POSTED BY IPSY on | August 18, 2013, 0:29 GMT

    Ricky's observation is correct! I personally think that England's better position in the series is due to the disproportinate advantage that they got from the excessive number of poor umpiring decisions (DRS, et al) made so far. The Stuart Broad issue is indelibly inscribed in my memory. If I did not see for myself and someone had told me, I would have said that they were lying!

  • POSTED BY Jaggadaaku on | August 18, 2013, 0:10 GMT

    Nobody's asking Punter for coaching. He was good as a batsman 4-5 years ago, but these days he is just like donkey. He has got a chance in IPL as a captain, but constantly lost 6 games with batting average less than 10 runs and strike rate of 69 in 20 overs format. Mumbai owner kicked him out as a captain and also from the next game. He hasn't been performing well in Caribbean Premier League either. Now Punter wants to go for coaching. What a joke! It was so hilarious! I can't stop laughing. AUS team is losing every game in this current Ashes, and they are 0-3 down, but Mr. Punter can see some positives in the team. Just like himself. No matter he constantly fails in every game, but he wants to act like he is still a good player and his blind fans still think he is some kind of legend. He only can teach these new AUS team players how to fight with umpires, breaking TV in frustration, after giving clean catch how not to leave the crease, how to do attacking catch appeals etc.

  • POSTED BY Nerk on | August 17, 2013, 23:19 GMT

    Good call Punter. I think Australia have shown their potential during this series. Every player has contributed at one stage or another and they've had their chances to win the test matches. The first test was close, they started a fight back at Lords but couldn't sustain it, the weather ruined what would have been a cracking final day in the 3rd test and Durham typified the series for Australia, because once again we had our chances to take control, but just couldn't do it. If this team sticks together for a year or so, and the players get more experienced, they will learn how to shift the momentum of a match in their favour - learn how to win the 'big points'. In this lineup, I don't see a world dominating team yet. But I do see a team with great potential and the skills to match it with the best.

  • POSTED BY deathstar01 on | August 17, 2013, 19:05 GMT

    Agreed with Ricky. But watson's form in a big concern. He needs more support from Clarck. Rogers the best performer for the aussies.

  • POSTED BY landl47 on | August 17, 2013, 18:52 GMT

    3-1 would be a fair reflection of the series. However, what Ponting and the Aus fans seem to be overlooking is who has performed well for Australia. Clarke made a big hundred at OT and that's the only time in 8 innings the Australians have passed 300. The only other batsman to have played well is Rogers and he's 35. By far the most dangerous Aus bowler has been Harris and he's 33 (34 in October) and made of porcelain. Siddle has been reliable as usual, but the young pacemen (Pattinson, Starc, Bird) haven't done much.

    When the old guys are keeping the side in the game, that's not a sign of a team on the rise. That's a team that's hanging on.

  • POSTED BY Captain_Tuk_Tuk on | August 17, 2013, 17:26 GMT

    Being as a neutral person I agree with Punter Ausis are a good side they just lack experience they would have won 3 matches but most people will see it as 3-0.

    I also agree that England is good side they are best Test side they can beat SA as well in England but Ausis are better than 3-0 at-least.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 16:28 GMT

    @Paul Mcallister: I don't think it's reasonable to say the two teams are very even - if that was the case, Australia would have had a few more 300+ totals than they have, and wouldn't have got absolutely hammered at Lord's. The fact is, this is a team that has lost 4-0 to India and 3-0 to England so far, against a team that beat the same Indian side 2-1. There are clear differences. The scoreline is fair.

    @ Narayanan Mahalingam: "In terms of young pace bowling talent, Australia have the best among all the test playing nations"

    This is not correct. South Africa have the best depth. Australia's best bowler is quite old, and is very injury prone. He will miss most of the return series Down Under. Australia's younger talents, like Pattinson and Bird, have looked ordinary in this series, and Cummins, well, where he is I have no idea. In fact, England's depth in bowling overall is slightly better than Australia's.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 16:14 GMT

    Australia have shown glimpses of good cricket, with the ball mind you, but their batting needs a lot of work. England have been pretty good at scrapping to reasonable totals but Australia have shown comparitively little ability to do so. They have only reached 300 once - while England have 5 300+ totals.

  • POSTED BY popcorn on | August 17, 2013, 14:09 GMT

    Ricky Ponting is the greatest example of how from grassroots cricket the second best Australian batsman (next to Bradman) developed. He can do wonders to instil patience, grit, determination, never -say-die, do not throw your wicket away, technique,pride on the Baggy Green,5 day Test Cricket endurance and skill.From Mowbrays in Launceston, to the Academy in Brisbane, the hard work he put in learning cricket, he would be the ideal Director at the COE at Brisbane, and aTalent Scout in Club Cricket, Grade Cricket. We need you, desperately, Punter.NOW.

  • POSTED BY 2MikeGattings on | August 17, 2013, 14:02 GMT

    Sounds like fair comment from Punter. Nobody worked harder at his game even with his incredible ability. There have been 2 close matches where England's experience and composure got them over the line. Australia will have to work with what they have got and scrap their way back. It took England 4 or 5 years with Fletcher, first under Hussain and then Vaughan, before they could compete with the best. Punter is talking about the long term. Reading between the lines it suggests that he doesn't have particularly high hopes for the return series down under.

  • POSTED BY siddhartha87 on | August 17, 2013, 13:31 GMT

    Australian cricket structure is designed in such a way that they suffer for 2-3 years once in every 30 years. It happened many times earlier. Ponting is spot on, the guys got talent.But sometimes things just don't click.Like in 2011-12 India with all Tendulkars,Dravids,Laxman and Sehwag suffered 0-8 defeat .Bell ,who is star of the moment looked like no 11 against pakistan. But now they look like world beaters. Australia have 7 test matches in home next ,so good time for them start winning again.So Just relax Aussie fans ,Australia will regain the ashes soon and will keep it for 20-25 years.

  • POSTED BY wellrounded87 on | August 17, 2013, 12:27 GMT

    @Devang Mamtora I don't think too many people are claiming the teams are balanced. But Australia aren't far off the mark. The big differences between the two sides are batting and spin. England clearly has a much better batting lineup with Aus's only quality batsmen being Clarke and he has only had one innings of substance in this series, it's no coincidence that AUS were completely on top when Clarke got runs. But most of our batsmen are young and are likely to improve after all Langer, S Waugh, Hayden etc all failed early in their careers before finding their feet. The biggest gap is spin. Swann is in another league to Lyon or Agar. Whats worse is our best spinner doesn't get a look in (but even he's not much better than Lyon). I think our fast bowlers though are better than England and that is reason we've been in a position to win 3 of the 4 tests so far. Experience will teach our team to find ways to win from positions like that.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 12:23 GMT

    Strange how Ricky referred to them as boys ..... An appropriate description???

  • POSTED BY android_user on | August 17, 2013, 12:13 GMT

    its cycle which come on every side to suffer and ozzie does have any exception.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 11:35 GMT

    if Australia have any sense, they will (try and) prepare 5 Perth style bouncy wickets as England don't like it up them! you only have to look at some recent thrashings England have suffered on fast, bouncy wickets:

    2009 Headingly - innings and plenty defeat to Australia 2009-10 Jo'burg - innings and plenty defeat to South Africa 2010-11 Perth - massive 250 runs defeat to Australia 2012 The Oval - inningsdefeat to South Africa 2013 Old Trafford - heading for massive defeat to Australia (until rain/bad light intervention on the 4th and 5th days)

  • POSTED BY Jaffa79 on | August 17, 2013, 11:07 GMT

    @ Jayzuz...you are without doubt the biggest whinger on these pages. Incapable of an honest appraisal of your bog average team. At least you haven't whined about the pitches which is your standard comment! You bleated about the Indian decks (wow! they spin? In India? Never!), which were the same pitches that England beat the Indians and also the pitches in England. You need to pull your head out of the sand and admit that Australia are a team in turmoil.

  • POSTED BY thelapal on | August 17, 2013, 11:06 GMT

    Ponting wants to encourage the team because there is no bench strength. strac,agar,maxwell,hughes,johnson,wade everyone failed.So only way is to encourage the players and make them feel confident.

  • POSTED BY gtr800 on | August 17, 2013, 10:56 GMT

    Whilst some may say that Australia have been denied a win or two because of bad weather & umpiring. I would agree if one superficially discounts the decisions that went against them. But the conclusion of the last test, the way Broad bowled & England fought back to get 8 wickets for the space of 100 runs shows that when the gulf between England & Australia is far more than the series scoredcards suggest. England do often appear like they are under the hammer but when required they always bounce back, which shows their motivation & ability to avoid losses. Yes, they might not be as ruthless as India in ODI's at the moment or Australia of the 90's but they play a different brand of cricket & have a lot of potential to retain this loss less streak. Australia may have played the better cricket for a longer duration but England when on song produce devastating spells of bowling & greater resolve while batting. Only time will tell whether this is due to the home crowd support or not.

  • POSTED BY Jayzuz on | August 17, 2013, 10:55 GMT

    Gotta laugh at those saying Aus can't win down under, they have come close to winning here in three tests. What makes you think they won't be vastly better at home? I think the Australian batsmen will love batting against Swann and co down there.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 10:27 GMT

    Australia had to rely on 2 tenth wicket partnerships in the first test to come close, second test was completely one sided. Third test was suppose to rain out before it started, clouds came in time to give the impression Australia was unlucky. Test 4, despite of super human efforts and career best performances by Harris and Rogers, Australia could not win. Does Ponting still believe things are close? It is hard to read things even with biased glasses. Dont know what other Ozz fans are thinking but there seems to be a wide rift between the two teams. Ian Bell, Anderson, Swane have been the players to shine but the teams are not balanced.

  • POSTED BY creekeetman on | August 17, 2013, 10:04 GMT

    @ Zak, England are behind India in test match ability??... Really? a 2-1 win for England in India strongly suggests otherwise. As for this series, as others have said, 3-0 is flattering to England. Oz would've won the 3rd test but for rain, they lost the first by only 14 runs, and had control for most of the 4th test only to lose because they have forgotten how to win. Truth is oz have the potential to be a decent team, however they need to accept that usman is not a test cricketer, that Watson should only play at 6, providing he's capable of bowling, and two of their better bowlers in pattinson and cummins need to be fit... a fast bowling attack with those two, along with harris and siddle is as good as any around at the moment.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 9:30 GMT

    @Kitschiguy: While I can't argue that England haven't been the dominant team I would say it has been a closer contest than 3-0 indicates. You say that "Australia have been saved by the weather, some poor umpiring and an England top order that are out of form." The only time weather has played a role in this series was in Manchester when Australia looked certain of a win. While the umpiring in this series has been bad I believe that it has been bad consistently enough to not have favored either side. And true Cook and Trott haven't scored the runs expected but I think some credit has to be given to the Australian bowlers on that count. I think you'll find that the difference between the two teams has been Ian Bell who has almost single handedly won this series for England.

  • POSTED BY Jayzuz on | August 17, 2013, 9:29 GMT

    It's been very frustrating to watch Austrslia on the verge of three test wins only to lose two and see rain deny them the other one. They could easily have won a couple of tests , and 3-0 really is a travesty of justice. Even the most biased English fan cant have helped but notice how everything has gone their way and at exactly the right times, again and again.The good news for the Aussie team is that they will only have to wait a few months for a great chance for revenge.

  • POSTED BY meursault on | August 17, 2013, 9:08 GMT

    @Kitschiguy: Australia down 3-0 saved by the weather and the umpiring?!? On this basis, I have taken your entire comment to be sarcastic and a massive stir-up...

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 9:07 GMT

    In terms of young pace bowling talent, Australia have the best among all the test playing nations. In Australian conditions, this attack could be a handful. Ricky Ponting is correct, England have not been that good as the scoreline suggests. But Australia have themselves to blame for not grabbing the opportunities that presented. The return Ashes could see England really stretched if Australia can correct the mistakes they are committing.

  • POSTED BY Kitschiguy on | August 17, 2013, 8:51 GMT

    At least he admitted to having his biased goggles on. But when he takes them off he'll realise that this series hasn't been as close as he and the Australian fans believe. Australia have been saved by the weather, some poor umpiring and an England top order that are out of form.

    This Australian team isn't that bad, but England are much better which has been highlighted by the fact Australia's much lauded bowling attack has looked pretty weak compared to England's who have found more reverse swing, more movement and are much faster. The two fastest bowlers in the series are broad and Finn who have both been in the nineties. Even Bresnan bowled faster than the Aussie bowlers.

  • POSTED BY liz1558 on | August 17, 2013, 8:49 GMT

    Australia haven't reached rock bottom yet - every chance they will get hogwashed 4-0 in Aus when England play to their full potential.

  • POSTED BY Zak- on | August 17, 2013, 8:32 GMT

    England sleepwalked to a 3-0 win. And England are behind India and South Africa in terms of test match ability at the moment, and are realistically most likely just above New Zealand. So 6th & 7th or 5th & 6th best test teams played and the better side was able to whip the other without waking up. Ominous for Australia, but there's writing on walls that needs to be heeded for England too.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 8:13 GMT

    Essex man: the difference is India dished out a proper hammering to Australia. Whereas, England are 3-0 despite being outplayed for large parts of the test series. you only have to take the 4th test for example. Yet again, England won an important toss but where outplayed for the first 3 days despite having the overhead conditions in their favour for all the first 3 days. and if it wasn't for the rain at Old Trafford, they would have been on the end of a proper hammering. I reckon the two teams are very even. With Australia have the best bowling attack and England the best batting attack (although 4 or 5 of them are having their techniques seriously exposed by the faster Australian bowling attack).

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 8:09 GMT

    Australia won't win the return Ashes down under this year. It will be a long slow graft with several more players coming and going. It's a tough choice for the selectors - stick with this group of players and hope that they learn over time and their defeats how to win Test matches or change players every series. Logic would suggest these players the confidence that only a long run in the team will bring. But Test wins are still a long way off for this team. They look like a number 7 or 8 ranked Test side.

  • POSTED BY Wefinishthis on | August 17, 2013, 8:02 GMT

    Not to take away from the fact that England have been the better side, but they've gotten very lucky with the weather and having Ian Bell hit a purple patch. The weather saved them in the only test that Australia were likely going to win and then it didn't save Australia when they were going to lose. Still, Australia has a major concern with the batting. Watson (83 Innings, Avg 34.51, HS 126), Hughes (49 Innings, Avg 32.65, HS 160), Cowan (32 Innings, Avg 31.28, HS 136), Smith (22 Innings, Avg 29.52, HS 92), Khawaja (17 Innings, Avg 25.13, HS 65). Compare that to our bowlers, Starc (18 Innings, Avg 31.15, HS 99), Pattinson (18 Innings, Avg 30.09, HS 42) and a case can be made to play a top 6 of Warner, Rogers, Starc, Clarke, Pattinson, Wade. Had Rogers, D.Hussey and O'Keefe been in earlier like I was screaming for years ago, the 'transition' period might have been a little easier, but instead we get to watch incredible selection incompetence keeping Australia in the doldrums.

  • POSTED BY android_user on | August 17, 2013, 7:56 GMT

    One of the major issues for Australian cricket is that young players who showed great potential a year or two ago simply havent improved their game to the next level, and in some cases have regressed. Shaun Marsh a couple of years ago was plauing outstanding cricket. On this Aust A tour barring one innings he has struggled to make double figures. Phil Hughes is another whose game has hit a wall as has Khawaja.

  • POSTED BY Essex_Man on | August 17, 2013, 7:30 GMT

    It is incredible that Australia have declined so much, and so quickly, in the past 5 or 6 years that people are now clutching at straws to find some bright points amidst a 3-0 hammering (which, don't forget, comes off the back of a 4-0 hammering in India). I'm afraid you're going to have to wake up and smell the coffee, lads - the cupboard is completely bare. Just be grateful the rain in Manchester has saved you from a 5-0 whitewash.

  • POSTED BY SamRoy on | August 17, 2013, 7:17 GMT

    If Australia can get a couple of good young batsman with decent technique and a big heart they can have a real crack at England in the home Ashes later in the year. Their biggest problems have been inability of young batsman and constant failure of Shane Watson.

  • POSTED BY Sir_Ivor on | August 17, 2013, 7:16 GMT

    I agree with Ponting that the current Ashes series has been closer than the what scoreline suggests. England hasbeen marginally better but not too much. Their batting other than Bell has not fired as much as was expected. Probably the days when all of them fire in unison are over. Now it is more Bell and an occasional Petersen show.They are vulnerable to good spin and seam bowling as Harris and even Lyon has shown.But this Australian side could do with some replacements. I would like Shaun Marsh,Glenn Maxwell Nick Maddinson and Coulter Nile to come in.These could make a difference and bring the team to the past Australian way. Hazelwood could be good if he keeps fit.They need a new captain. Clarke is a very good player but he should give the captaincy to Haddin or Watson.Then he can play his normal gameThe most important aspect is that all the Australian batsmen must tighten up their defence of either foot. I find that they are poor in this regard.A good defence is not negotiable.

  • POSTED BY MaruthuDelft on | August 17, 2013, 7:07 GMT

    @ Anton Langridge, Spot On. It will happen in the return leg of Ashes; Australia will win back the urn.

  • POSTED BY sailboatmike on | August 17, 2013, 6:43 GMT

    Well said for a captain that holds the record for losing the ashes!!!!

  • POSTED BY Clyde on | August 17, 2013, 6:31 GMT

    All Australia has to do is notice a few State batsmen better than Katich. Of course it is difficult. Who are the other scorers of big hundreds in a format relevant to Test cricket? Ironically, if Ponting wants to coach Australia, one of the best things he does is show that native talent and character, which are qualities personal and not coached, are crucial to a firm place in a Test team.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 6:28 GMT

    This is written more in optimism. THeir performances in India in test series and england have been absyml. MC Clarke is only batsmen capable of scoring runs and Sidle and Harris are only capable of taking wickets. Just with 3 players you cannot win test matches. This team is as bad as Westindies and Bangladesh. Their last 2 series have not given the slightest viewing pleasure. The Repeat of this Ashes is going to take place in Nov -Dec this year again in Australia. RIP

  • POSTED BY JohnnyRook on | August 17, 2013, 6:23 GMT

    As someone with no affiliations with Australia or England, I must say Ricky Ponting is right. Ofcourse the scoreline is what matters in the end to decide the series but it is true that it has been closer than it seems and young Australian players can take heart from that. Same is suggested by S Rajesh is his stats article.

  • POSTED BY CrICkeeet on | August 17, 2013, 6:20 GMT

    Well said punter.... bt really feeling sad dat i cant see smthng magical r8 now.... :/

  • POSTED BY android_user on | August 17, 2013, 6:10 GMT

    Just need 1 other batsman to go with Rogers and Clarke and we'll start to win more than we lose.

  • POSTED BY android_user on | August 17, 2013, 6:02 GMT

    He jst wants to get a job of coaching Australian team, tats it... Poor Ricky...

  • POSTED BY heathrf1974 on | August 17, 2013, 5:55 GMT

    I agree with some of what he says. However, it is the older players who have contributed the most. If the younger players begin to contribute more significantly, then we can say with more certainty that progress has been made.

  • POSTED BY android_user on | August 17, 2013, 5:51 GMT

    agreed with punter they have the ability 2 beat eng n any team they just need a coach like kirstn or andy flower

  • POSTED BY picket23 on | August 17, 2013, 5:47 GMT

    Please get Punter mentoring our young ~16-20 year old players NOW. We need him coaching them in the way of winning through battling. Get them off the bowling machine with some nobody personal batting coach and playing matches and training under the supervision of an ex cross dresser fighting, binge drinking hard nut. NOW. This crop and the next coming through are weak as wee.

  • POSTED BY picket23 on | August 17, 2013, 5:47 GMT

    Please get Punter mentoring our young ~16-20 year old players NOW. We need him coaching them in the way of winning through battling. Get them off the bowling machine with some nobody personal batting coach and playing matches and training under the supervision of an ex cross dresser fighting, binge drinking hard nut. NOW. This crop and the next coming through are weak as wee.

  • POSTED BY android_user on | August 17, 2013, 5:51 GMT

    agreed with punter they have the ability 2 beat eng n any team they just need a coach like kirstn or andy flower

  • POSTED BY heathrf1974 on | August 17, 2013, 5:55 GMT

    I agree with some of what he says. However, it is the older players who have contributed the most. If the younger players begin to contribute more significantly, then we can say with more certainty that progress has been made.

  • POSTED BY android_user on | August 17, 2013, 6:02 GMT

    He jst wants to get a job of coaching Australian team, tats it... Poor Ricky...

  • POSTED BY android_user on | August 17, 2013, 6:10 GMT

    Just need 1 other batsman to go with Rogers and Clarke and we'll start to win more than we lose.

  • POSTED BY CrICkeeet on | August 17, 2013, 6:20 GMT

    Well said punter.... bt really feeling sad dat i cant see smthng magical r8 now.... :/

  • POSTED BY JohnnyRook on | August 17, 2013, 6:23 GMT

    As someone with no affiliations with Australia or England, I must say Ricky Ponting is right. Ofcourse the scoreline is what matters in the end to decide the series but it is true that it has been closer than it seems and young Australian players can take heart from that. Same is suggested by S Rajesh is his stats article.

  • POSTED BY on | August 17, 2013, 6:28 GMT

    This is written more in optimism. THeir performances in India in test series and england have been absyml. MC Clarke is only batsmen capable of scoring runs and Sidle and Harris are only capable of taking wickets. Just with 3 players you cannot win test matches. This team is as bad as Westindies and Bangladesh. Their last 2 series have not given the slightest viewing pleasure. The Repeat of this Ashes is going to take place in Nov -Dec this year again in Australia. RIP

  • POSTED BY Clyde on | August 17, 2013, 6:31 GMT

    All Australia has to do is notice a few State batsmen better than Katich. Of course it is difficult. Who are the other scorers of big hundreds in a format relevant to Test cricket? Ironically, if Ponting wants to coach Australia, one of the best things he does is show that native talent and character, which are qualities personal and not coached, are crucial to a firm place in a Test team.

  • POSTED BY sailboatmike on | August 17, 2013, 6:43 GMT

    Well said for a captain that holds the record for losing the ashes!!!!