Sachin Tendulkar's retirement October 10, 2013

The unimpeachable straight bat

ESPNcricinfo staffers pick their top Tendulkar moments
47

Who is Sachin?
Arya Yuyutsu: My mum yelped in delight as I dawdled around, amazed at the lack of attention I was getting. I may have been 6, but I was pampered and spoilt and it seemed unfair that mum was yelping in delight at a little man in blue clothes wielding some sort of wooden stick, raising it over his head in indiscernible manner.

"Who's he?" I mumbled, visibly irked.

"Sachin Tendulkar!" gasped mum, visibly excited.

"Who is Sachin Tendulkar?" I asked, noticeably upset.

"Someone very special," replied mum, noticeably overawed, "he is an Indian God!"

I've never been forced towards any religion or belief, but mum made sure I believed in the one physical God that mattered - Sachin Tendulkar!
Arya Yuyutsu is a multimedia journalist at ESPNcricinfo

The first glimpse
Umar Farooq: I first saw Sachin Tendulkar in person during a net session at SuperSport Park in Centurion, during the 2009 Champions Trophy. I was excited and wondered how to make the best of the moment, but decided against asking for an autograph, handshake or picture. I wanted something more valuable, and so I stood behind the grille separating us by five or six feet and watched his every movement. As an admirer of his smooth straight drive, I hoped he would play it repeatedly for me, and as if on cue Tendulkar asked Gary Kirsten if he could come closer and throw so that he could play straight. Coincidence it may have been, but it was like those moments were especially for me.
Umar Farooq is ESPNcricinfo's Pakistan correspondent

Deliverance from above
Shiva Jayaraman: I had bunked school that day, possibly for the first time, and stayed home, feigning illness, to watch an India-Pakistan ODI. Guilt ridden as I already was, I saw it as just punishment that first the match was stripped of ODI status, and then Pakistan plundered some 150-odd runs from 20 overs. And then Tendulkar happened: a mere lad who took apart Abdul Qadir in one over. The gods had better things to do than punish a boy for bunking school, after all, or maybe Sachin Tendulkar brought me deliverance that day.
Shiva Jayaraman is a sub-editor (stats) at ESPNcricinfo

Mohammad Isam: The wide verandah on top of the press box at the Shere Bangla National Stadium was a squeeze, as 30,000 people waited for Sachin Tendulkar's 100th hundred. I had gone upstairs when he was in the eighties, to get a sense of the packed house down below. When the moment arrived, I was standing straight behind and above Tendulkar as he jogged the single to his very own fiefdom. The sweeping 360-degree view vibrated as one. I can tell my grandkids that I was there.
Mohammad Isam is ESPNcricinfo's Bangladesh correspondent

The man who made the country smile
Jayaditya Gupta: As a journalist I've worked in cities across India as different from each other as Kolkata and Chandigarh, Baroda and Bangalore. Almost the sole constant has been cricket, which transcends the usual barriers of language, class, caste, religion; and nothing in cricket has been so unifying a factor as Tendulkar. For 24 years he has been a lightning rod for our emotions; a Tendulkar century could lift spirits on the gloomiest of days, a failure could plunge the country into deep despair. No other single Indian - and I choose my words carefully - has had the ability to make the entire country smile. My guess is that's another record that will go with him.
Jayaditya Gupta is executive editor at ESPNcricinfo

Dignity in the face of tragedy
Kanishkaa Balachandran: Sachin Tendulkar won several battles with his mind on the field, but there's one story of his mental strength off it that stands out for me. In the 1999 World Cup, with the hopes of millions resting on his shoulders, I remembered the shock when news came of his father¹s death early in the tournament.

Tendulkar returned home. He needed his space. And time. Incredibly, he chose to return to England after missing just one game, but despite the relief there was the inescapable doubt ­ would he be the same again? Had he rushed it? Those doubts were cleared in a breathtaking innings of 140 off 101 balls against Kenya in Bristol. Tendulkar was in the zone. He didn't let personal tragedy come between him and his responsibility to the country. He bottled up his emotions when he spoke after the game, maintaining his dignity. More than sympathy and admiration, the biggest thing you felt for him during that episode was respect.
Kanishkaa Balachandran is a senior sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo

The day I didn't meet Tendulkar
Amol Karhadkar: Having earned a few prizes in table tennis, I will always regret missing what would have been my most cherished prize. As a 13-year-old, I was supposed to receive it from Sachin Tendulkar, who was the guest of honour at a state-ranking table tennis tournament at Khar Gymkhana in 1994. Sadly, what stood between me and meeting the man was conjunctivitis. The infection meant I had to skip the prize distribution ceremony, which was held two days after my event was over. Cut to November 2013, when Tendulkar will return to the dressing room from a cricket field one last time. I wouldn't mind if the eyes are wet (though not sore), in one of the rare moments of the fan in me overtaking the cynical journalist. Amol Karhadkar is a correspondent at ESPNcricinfo

Australia via Edinburgh
Alagappan Muthu: I hadn't expected to be homesick in Edinburgh, considering the place has long been one of my dream destinations, but Sachin Tendulkar was there to save the day, if only via Youtube. It was Diwali and the quiet guy, as my room-mates called me, nearly woke up half the neighbourhood while watching one of the millions of Tendulkar montages strewn around cyberspace. They assumed I had had a bad dream, and a few embarrassed apologies later, we were all crouched around my laptop as Brett Lee was treated to a straight drive that might even have been the redemption of the phrase "tracer bullet". You know the one I'm talking about - the fourth match of the Commonwealth Bank tri-series in 2008, which India won - when all Tendulkar did was meet the ball with that almost unimpeachable straight bat.
Alagappan Muthu is a sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo

With Sachin, alone
Devashish Fuloria: An early morning in March 1994, I woke up in time to catch India's chase against New Zealand in Auckland. The target was below 150, but when Tendulkar walked out to open, I got anxious, fidgety, jumpy.

He launched a manic attack on the bowlers. I was not sure if I was watching a real match. I moved around the room, looked for someone to talk to, but everyone was outside, celebrating Holi. I watched the innings with trepidation, a fear that drew me in. Then, when you least expected it, he was out, to a spinner. Caught and bowled. I was relieved in a way that it was over. I wanted to talk about what I had just seen, but there was no one, and we didn't have a phone back then. It was almost like he played that innings just for me. It was the last time I ever watched Tendulkar alone.
Devashish Fuloria is a sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo

The shot heard around the world
Rohan Sharma: Sachin Tendulkar's career has almost spanned my entire existence, and it wasn't till the 1996 World Cup that I caught my first glimpse of the unassuming boy next door who ripped apart world-class attacks with disdain, and bore the hopes of a nation on his shoulders. His 134 during Operation Desert Storm ranks as one of his finest tons, played against a red-hot Australian team, with a heady mix of deft touches and calculated malice. One shot that stood out was a lofted six back over Michael Kasprowicz's head that seemed to lift higher as the crowd's intensity swelled.
Rohan Sharma is a sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo

Give the ball to Tendulkar
George Binoy: I enjoyed watching Sachin Tendulkar most when he was in the field, perhaps because the knot in my stomach when he was batting during the 1990s was too much to overcome. If Tendulkar failed, in all probability so would India. That weight, however, was rarely visible on his face when he batted under a helmet. He just looked focused and determined.

The joy that he said cricket constantly gave him was visible when Tendulkar was bowling. He smiled more, and wore his emotions as batsmen underestimated the degree of his spin and swing. Tendulkar could bowl everything - both kinds of spin, and swing it out and in; another example of his genius.

Six runs to defend off the final over? Don't give it to Kapil Dev, Srinath or Prabhakar, but to Tendulkar.
George Binoy is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

His most memorable moments

What's your favourite Sachin Tendulkar memory? Write to us via the comments section on this story

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • RaviNarla on October 11, 2013, 17:28 GMT

    He had 3 different shots for the same kind of ball. For the ball that was bowled straight, He lofted straight, He flicked it and he played it over covers. Boy 'o' boy that was when I though Sachin would single handedly win games for India in the days to come and he did. Not to forget the back to back games in Shariah in 1998. I have watched him play a couple of times at MRF pace foundation at MCC school in Chennai. If you watched him in close quarters one would feel he is different league of his own. Meteors hit earth very rarely. Sachin is one that hit earth. It has left a telling blow in minds of millions that watched create regardless of geographical location you came from.

  • RaviNarla on October 11, 2013, 17:28 GMT

    For me he is the best cricket batsman to have walked on this planet. He has affected my exams many a times. First one during my mid term exams when I was in 10th grade. 16 Dec 1989 when he shredded Pak bowling into pieces. He scored a 53 of 18 balls including a 27 run over from Abdul Qadir. Second one was when I skipped a university exam. I think It was February 21 0r 22 of 1994. Sachin opened for the first time in a ODI with Prabhakar. New-Zealand batted first and scored a paltry 149 or 150. I was going to go for the exam after first innings. In came Sachin and I just wanted to watch a couple of overs and head for the exam. It never happened(attending my exam) and I stood at awe watching Sachin play another blitzkrieg. He scored an 82 0f 49 balls. He got out to Mathew hart. When he walked to the Pavilion, there was not a single person that was not standing. Continued...

  • Hey-Ram on October 11, 2013, 7:55 GMT

    With Sachin, there are so so many! But the one I am going to single out is the 103* against Eng, Chn 2008 chasing 387. The final day of the test was on 15-Dec-2008 and that happened to be the day of my engagement! So, here I was, in Bangalore, getting engaged to my wife-to-be and the family gathering around. And there was my brother, coming up every minute or so giving updates on how the match was progressing! At one stage, I almost felt like "I have to go down there and watch the game!!!" As if to rub it in, most of my cousins were there watching the game (not the engagement!!) - each one being a fellow cricket fanatic! A couple of the guests even commented how nervous I looked. Oh they had no idea, except for a different reason! Well, both engagement and match ended on a good note! Till date, I remember my engagement as the day when Sachin scored THAT century and won the game. And it happened in Chennai, my city! Thankfully, my wife is just happy I remember the date, any which way.

  • samirdesai on October 11, 2013, 5:07 GMT

    My favorite Sachin moment was on the intervening night of 22nd/ 23rd November, 1993. My wife in labour pain, me torn between choice of being in the labor room lobby or close to a television set as the Hero Cup semifinal entered its' last stages! Sachin snatched the ball for the last over with just 6 runs required, and the gynaec told me, any moment now. Sachin bowled that last and most dramatic over, India won, my daughter was born and fireworks began! A couple of generations in India will remember their life in terms of the Sachin timiline! Memorably, I met him twice and on the last occasion as he was returning after winning the Ranji Trophy for Mumbai, from Hyderabad, I took his autograph for my son! The only one I've ever collected in my life! Thanks Sachin for being there for us!

  • on October 25, 2013, 19:51 GMT

    i remembered the day in 1994 chasing against kiwis;sachin opened the innings..amazing display of powerful hitting!!!

  • on October 25, 2013, 18:25 GMT

    my memory dates back to that deadly sharjah cup match were sachin scored some 80 something in 94-95.. wasim was in his prime... i remember the words from commentary box imran khan saying to sunny gavaskar that Sachin was struggling to play wasim as Sachin was hit on his helmet couple of times in that innings.... and imran was speaking to gavaskar the next ball from Wasim pitched short Sachin hooks him of ovet square leg for a huge six..... trust me there was a lull in commentary box for more 5 mins imran didnt utter a word until gavaskar started.... thats the kind if silence that Sachin brings to everyone.... Although he got out of Saqlain bowling but the clash between Sachin and Wasim really was a treat not just for the viewers but also for the commentators at the pressbox.

  • srimmalapudi on October 17, 2013, 20:07 GMT

    The night of 22nd April 1998 - I was in a boarding school prepping for a highly competitive entrance test that would get me a college admission. That place is on par with Alcatraz a.k.a The Rock with fenced compound walls, wardens taking rounds to check on the students and what not. A bunch of us (toppers of class included) collaborated and successfully crossed the 10 foot fenced wall to get to a nearest mom and pop store that has a 14" TV. That probably btw is the most wildest thing ever for most of us. Boy oh boy, we have no idea that was going to be one of the cherished memories of our lives. We watched the master demolishing Aussie quality bowling attack to get India qualified for the finals. The kind of entertainment we got that day is just unforgettable. The positive attitude/confidence levels we returned with that day is something that never left us. THANK YOU SACHIN for a life lesson - NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE. That night went into the history books as Operation Sand Storm!!!

  • on October 16, 2013, 11:01 GMT

    My first memory of Sachin, was when I was 4years old, in 1993, when I saw him on TV and I remember asking my brother, who is this? From that day, I tried to become this one person in life, cricket became my life, sachin became my God. Sachin was everything, i tried to imitate everything he did, know all stats of him, everything. I remember my first live match in Bangalore with my uncle, I was allowed free because I was way too young. He thrashed the South africans with a 100. From then on I have watched every match he played at Bangalore. Though we dont know him personally, he has taught values of passion, humility, determination, integrity which will always live on. Childhood to now, cricket was just him, the joy he has bought me and millions of us. From buying the same 'mrf' bat, to keeping posters of him, he was more than an idol. His best innings according to me was the 214 in bangalore, and in ODIs, the sharjah desertstorm.

  • on October 14, 2013, 9:39 GMT

    I was working for DELHI DAREDEVILS when a day before a match between DD and Mumbai Indians, Sachin Tendulkar was practicing and he turned around to start walking towards us and said 'HI'.. :)

  • on October 12, 2013, 22:18 GMT

    I was 9 years when my father got the cable connection in the house so as we could watch other channels as well apart from doordarshan. In the night when everyone was done watching Terminator-2, I switched to Star Sports. I witnessed something special which created my love for the game. Sachin was smashing Shane Warne, Michael Kasprowicz, Damien Fleming, Mark Waugh, Daren Lehman, Tom Moody and even Steve Waugh all around the packed stadium in Sharjah. He was the only one who was batting, Whenever the other batsman was at strike, they all took single and gave the strike to Sachin who was hitting the ball so well. I felt Tony Grieg enjoyed his batting more than me sitting on the marble flooring in front of the television. When he got out on 143, for me the entertainment was over.

  • RaviNarla on October 11, 2013, 17:28 GMT

    He had 3 different shots for the same kind of ball. For the ball that was bowled straight, He lofted straight, He flicked it and he played it over covers. Boy 'o' boy that was when I though Sachin would single handedly win games for India in the days to come and he did. Not to forget the back to back games in Shariah in 1998. I have watched him play a couple of times at MRF pace foundation at MCC school in Chennai. If you watched him in close quarters one would feel he is different league of his own. Meteors hit earth very rarely. Sachin is one that hit earth. It has left a telling blow in minds of millions that watched create regardless of geographical location you came from.

  • RaviNarla on October 11, 2013, 17:28 GMT

    For me he is the best cricket batsman to have walked on this planet. He has affected my exams many a times. First one during my mid term exams when I was in 10th grade. 16 Dec 1989 when he shredded Pak bowling into pieces. He scored a 53 of 18 balls including a 27 run over from Abdul Qadir. Second one was when I skipped a university exam. I think It was February 21 0r 22 of 1994. Sachin opened for the first time in a ODI with Prabhakar. New-Zealand batted first and scored a paltry 149 or 150. I was going to go for the exam after first innings. In came Sachin and I just wanted to watch a couple of overs and head for the exam. It never happened(attending my exam) and I stood at awe watching Sachin play another blitzkrieg. He scored an 82 0f 49 balls. He got out to Mathew hart. When he walked to the Pavilion, there was not a single person that was not standing. Continued...

  • Hey-Ram on October 11, 2013, 7:55 GMT

    With Sachin, there are so so many! But the one I am going to single out is the 103* against Eng, Chn 2008 chasing 387. The final day of the test was on 15-Dec-2008 and that happened to be the day of my engagement! So, here I was, in Bangalore, getting engaged to my wife-to-be and the family gathering around. And there was my brother, coming up every minute or so giving updates on how the match was progressing! At one stage, I almost felt like "I have to go down there and watch the game!!!" As if to rub it in, most of my cousins were there watching the game (not the engagement!!) - each one being a fellow cricket fanatic! A couple of the guests even commented how nervous I looked. Oh they had no idea, except for a different reason! Well, both engagement and match ended on a good note! Till date, I remember my engagement as the day when Sachin scored THAT century and won the game. And it happened in Chennai, my city! Thankfully, my wife is just happy I remember the date, any which way.

  • samirdesai on October 11, 2013, 5:07 GMT

    My favorite Sachin moment was on the intervening night of 22nd/ 23rd November, 1993. My wife in labour pain, me torn between choice of being in the labor room lobby or close to a television set as the Hero Cup semifinal entered its' last stages! Sachin snatched the ball for the last over with just 6 runs required, and the gynaec told me, any moment now. Sachin bowled that last and most dramatic over, India won, my daughter was born and fireworks began! A couple of generations in India will remember their life in terms of the Sachin timiline! Memorably, I met him twice and on the last occasion as he was returning after winning the Ranji Trophy for Mumbai, from Hyderabad, I took his autograph for my son! The only one I've ever collected in my life! Thanks Sachin for being there for us!

  • on October 25, 2013, 19:51 GMT

    i remembered the day in 1994 chasing against kiwis;sachin opened the innings..amazing display of powerful hitting!!!

  • on October 25, 2013, 18:25 GMT

    my memory dates back to that deadly sharjah cup match were sachin scored some 80 something in 94-95.. wasim was in his prime... i remember the words from commentary box imran khan saying to sunny gavaskar that Sachin was struggling to play wasim as Sachin was hit on his helmet couple of times in that innings.... and imran was speaking to gavaskar the next ball from Wasim pitched short Sachin hooks him of ovet square leg for a huge six..... trust me there was a lull in commentary box for more 5 mins imran didnt utter a word until gavaskar started.... thats the kind if silence that Sachin brings to everyone.... Although he got out of Saqlain bowling but the clash between Sachin and Wasim really was a treat not just for the viewers but also for the commentators at the pressbox.

  • srimmalapudi on October 17, 2013, 20:07 GMT

    The night of 22nd April 1998 - I was in a boarding school prepping for a highly competitive entrance test that would get me a college admission. That place is on par with Alcatraz a.k.a The Rock with fenced compound walls, wardens taking rounds to check on the students and what not. A bunch of us (toppers of class included) collaborated and successfully crossed the 10 foot fenced wall to get to a nearest mom and pop store that has a 14" TV. That probably btw is the most wildest thing ever for most of us. Boy oh boy, we have no idea that was going to be one of the cherished memories of our lives. We watched the master demolishing Aussie quality bowling attack to get India qualified for the finals. The kind of entertainment we got that day is just unforgettable. The positive attitude/confidence levels we returned with that day is something that never left us. THANK YOU SACHIN for a life lesson - NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE. That night went into the history books as Operation Sand Storm!!!

  • on October 16, 2013, 11:01 GMT

    My first memory of Sachin, was when I was 4years old, in 1993, when I saw him on TV and I remember asking my brother, who is this? From that day, I tried to become this one person in life, cricket became my life, sachin became my God. Sachin was everything, i tried to imitate everything he did, know all stats of him, everything. I remember my first live match in Bangalore with my uncle, I was allowed free because I was way too young. He thrashed the South africans with a 100. From then on I have watched every match he played at Bangalore. Though we dont know him personally, he has taught values of passion, humility, determination, integrity which will always live on. Childhood to now, cricket was just him, the joy he has bought me and millions of us. From buying the same 'mrf' bat, to keeping posters of him, he was more than an idol. His best innings according to me was the 214 in bangalore, and in ODIs, the sharjah desertstorm.

  • on October 14, 2013, 9:39 GMT

    I was working for DELHI DAREDEVILS when a day before a match between DD and Mumbai Indians, Sachin Tendulkar was practicing and he turned around to start walking towards us and said 'HI'.. :)

  • on October 12, 2013, 22:18 GMT

    I was 9 years when my father got the cable connection in the house so as we could watch other channels as well apart from doordarshan. In the night when everyone was done watching Terminator-2, I switched to Star Sports. I witnessed something special which created my love for the game. Sachin was smashing Shane Warne, Michael Kasprowicz, Damien Fleming, Mark Waugh, Daren Lehman, Tom Moody and even Steve Waugh all around the packed stadium in Sharjah. He was the only one who was batting, Whenever the other batsman was at strike, they all took single and gave the strike to Sachin who was hitting the ball so well. I felt Tony Grieg enjoyed his batting more than me sitting on the marble flooring in front of the television. When he got out on 143, for me the entertainment was over.

  • Cricketfan23 on October 12, 2013, 20:27 GMT

    There are so many memories to choose from, its impossible to pick one. He had great battles with some of the best bowlers of his time. We always used to look forward to his duels with bated breath. The way he took the attack to Warne at Chennai, McGrath at Nairobi, Akhtar at Centurion, Olonga at Sharjah, Steyn at Gwalior, Donald at Capetown etc. was simply breathtaking. There will never be anyone like him & cricket won't be same without him. We have been truly privileged to have seen the great man during our lifetime.

  • on October 12, 2013, 14:57 GMT

    We were in Nagpur on vacation and my Dad informed us that we'd watching the 4th India-Australia Test in the new Jamtha stadium. The day of arrived and India had won the toss and elected to bat; we were flying back the next day so God truly loved us. Sehwag raced to his 50. The wall was out for a duck so that was disappointing but it also meant Sachin would walk out. Jamtha is 20 km away from the main city. In a stadium made for 30,000 only 3,500 were present. The roar when the great man walked out must have reached Haldiram's in the city. Sachin displayed everything in his repertoire that day - the patience, the skill, the timing, the aggression. On 88 and 96, a part of the Sachin innings when the crowd is more nervous than him, he was dropped. And he went on to make his century. That day I felt GOD wanted me to see Sachin score a century. But I later realized it was probably because even GOD wanted Sachin to score a century. In a life filled with stunning moments it's unfair to pick 1

  • on October 12, 2013, 14:53 GMT

    I have watched so many matches of Sachin, but have never seen him as intense or committed in a game as that of 2003 WC semifinal against Pakistan, set a stiff target to chase someone had to play a blinder in such a crunch game and the way he shut of Akthar with that first over of his was just amazing, and then he tamed Waqar and then Wasim and then Afridi, he not only had to counter these bowlers but also the physical problem his hamstring/cramp was giving, he countered all those, but the hamstring/cramp was giving him so much trouble that for the first time in his career he had to call a runner, he feel agonizingly short of a 100, when people thought he would get a century and take us to the final, had he got there it would have been as big as the sharjah storm inngs, this inngs in centurion kind of epitomizes what sachin gave us, the fans......lots of joy and some agony and not to forget the 'expectation' ...thankyou for the memories Sachin...

  • on October 12, 2013, 11:37 GMT

    It will take months to believe Tendulkar has retired and a year to express his contribution to Indian cricket and impact on Indian fans. Please be reminded he was not only a ODI batsman. He played many top class innings in Test matches. Lets start with just Test matches and forget ODI for few weeks :-)

  • moBlue on October 12, 2013, 8:49 GMT

    my favorite sachin moments are three - two when he promised us IND fans the world as a prodigious teenage talent in 1989 in PAK... yes, the 3 sixes in a row against qadir and the 2 sixes and a four in a row against mushtaq ahmed left me awestruck, but before those joyous moments of a teenager celebrating was the nerve-racking moment of a taut, angry and determined cut to the deep point boundary off a second successive waqar younis bouncer in a test match after the first one had bloodied his nose... i've read that a sign followed in the PAK stadium after that cut borne of grudging respect: "ek sher aa gaya!"... indeed!

    my third favorite tendulkar moment was in 2002, test 1, day 1 against SA on a super-fast centurion pitch... IND were inserted and predictably down in the dumps at 68 for 4 with sachin unbeaten on a cautious 20-something. sehwag walked in on his test debut at #6... and sachin went berserk in a calculated assault which included an upper-cut over slips on his way to 130!!!

  • cricketfan09 on October 12, 2013, 7:25 GMT

    2003 World Cup. Ind v Pak. Centurion. Pretty good score by Pak first up, 270 odd aided by Saeed Anwar's ton. India's reply- Sachin and Sehwag v Akram and Akhtar. First over by Akram. 8 runs. 1 boundary each for S & S. 2nd over- Shoaib Akhtar. 4 runs off the first 4 balls, only one off the bat. Then, 6 by Sachin over point. Intentional. Not an outside edge. Followed by a four. And another four. In between one of those, he shrugged his shoulders/neck/face (to adjust the helmet without actually touching it; he does that a lot). Steely determination in his eyes. Focus. I believed. Whole of India believed. We could win this thing. And it was versus Pakistan. Bliss. Shoaib Akhtar 1-0-18-0. The best moment. Period. End of story. Everyone else go home....

  • CricFan24 on October 12, 2013, 4:24 GMT

    Woke up with the WORST hangover of my life - and it's got nothing to do with alcohol.

  • on October 11, 2013, 18:32 GMT

    I had bunked college and gone to Mumbai from Dubai to watch MI's first game at Wankhede after the world cup and more so cause I wanted to see Sachin Tendulkar bat. The game was against Kochi Tuskers Kerala and he scored a magnificent century, the entire stadium was cheering his name and I was in tears. I felt so honoured and blessed to have seen Tendulkar score his maiden T20 century at the stadium.

  • A..G.. on October 11, 2013, 18:10 GMT

    When I started watching the game, Sachin had already been considered the main batsman of Indian team. Our generation grew with Sachin. My favourite Sachin moment was of course the Sharjah epic,1998. I doubt if any other nation has to celebrate so much for a lost game. Very close will stand the 136 against Pakistan in Chennai and 175 against Aussies. I never felt so heartbroken what I felt after that Chennai test. This was the best test innings I have ever seen. I consider myself fortunate to watch such an innings of grit,composure,determination and brilliance against a dangerous Pak attack on an equally dangerous Chennai pitch all through struggling with back pain. The 98 against Pakistan in 2003 will surely come in the list. I can never forget the Hero cup semifinal as well. When I think about the match now, it appears so symbolic to me. Sachin given the ball instead of Kapil, the batton passes from one generation to the next. Thank you Sachin for giving us so much to cherish. Respect

  • allinwhites on October 11, 2013, 18:02 GMT

    Will take a cue from Binoy.. Love Tendulkar's joy after claiming a wicket. And one that sticks in my mind is the dismissal of Moin Khan with the final ball of third day's play in the 2004 Multan Test against Pakistan. The bewilderment on Moin's face and the wild celebration of the Indian team said it all. And, my hometown Kochi is the venue the master has returned both his five-wicket ODI hauls. And the first one against Australia was truly special, just for the victims he had on that memorable day -- Steve Waugh, Lehmann, Bevan, Moody and Damien Martyn. Wow... Hope MSD will give Sachin a chance to turn his arm over against Windies, alas one last time...

  • on October 11, 2013, 17:55 GMT

    How can one restrict a legend's life to one favorite moment? It was fun to watch Sachin hit Abdul Quadir for consecutive sixes in Pakistan when he was a teenager. I was fortunate enough to watch his innings as an Opener vs NZ in which he slaughtered the opposition and permanently sealed his place as an opener in the Indian team. Sachin's back to back hundreds against Australia in Sharjah gave us the confidence that we don't have to fear the Aus bowling attack and their flawless fielders. If I had to decide between Lara's flamboyant batting or Sachin's consistent batting I would choose the latter.

    Sachin's scintillating knocks against Pakistan in the world cups against stellar bowlers like Wasim Akram, Waqar Younis and Shoaib Akthar proved his mettle and his ability to keep his calm under pressure. There was a time if Sachin got out, there was no reason to watch the game afterwards. It's not just me, even the current Indian Captain did just that.

  • on October 11, 2013, 17:35 GMT

    many people have mentioned that innings of 175 against Aus chasing 350. My moment was just before that innings started. watch on Youtube, last ball of Australia innings, score already 350 and tendulkar at cover boundry. shot was hit to him and he dived forward for the catch.. he caught it.. no , that;s not the moment, it came after that. he just threw the ball in air and just walked off with such a angry look on his face, which said one thing- I will show you how to bat... he made 175.. watch that moment..

  • on October 11, 2013, 17:30 GMT

    Everyone seems have forgotten but I bet Moin Khan will never forget that googly that took out his stump when him and Abdul Razzak were playing for light, hoping somehow to survive that final over of the day

  • on October 11, 2013, 17:16 GMT

    IND vs AUS, Hyderabad, 2008 (?). Ind chasing 350 something and SRT blasting his way through to 175. Hauritz was no Warnie, but the two sixes smashed steeping out reminded us younger souls what desert storm would have been like. Wickets kept falling and he kept hitting them. Never let the run rate get up. It was all over again for us to see, what the SRT era was. He stood firm, the sole man against the eleven Aussies and kept them at bay. He was beyond humanity for the time he batted. But alas, age caught him, after 47 overs of ruthless batting, probably the age caught him. This innings to me epitomizes his career. The way he kept shouldering the burden till he could... and suddenly after a long innings...of keeping trying, the age has finally caught him. Ind lost that match, but that cant be put to SRT. One would expect last 5 batsmen to score 18 of 18! Thankfully to him and to us, the reality is not so harsh! Thanks SRT for the memories....

  • Rahulbose on October 11, 2013, 17:10 GMT

    I am another fan who can proudly claim to have watched Sachin at his best, even if it was always on the tele. To me there are couple incidents that have become personal memories. First is the 136 vs Pakistan in Chennai, that day I was travelling with family to a temple where worshipers walk all day to pray for their wishes. The only thing on my mind all day was the outcome of the test match, it was almost like I could sense that it was a close tense match that I was missing. I came back home and watched the rerun without knowing the outcome and shared the heartbreak with rest of India and Sachin. The second one is an interview of Sachin. He was asked about what he thinks makes him special. He replied that he found most people dream big, a lot of them are talented but don't realize it takes small steps to reach excellence, also that their energy and passion is not focused on a primary goal but rather diverted to other tasks. His answer has a been an inspiration ever since.

  • rrchary on October 11, 2013, 16:35 GMT

    The only way for the nation to honor Sachin is to confer on him Bharath Rathna

  • aaceees on October 11, 2013, 16:25 GMT

    all i remem is watching cricket due to tendulkar since the age of 7.. nowdays also i only watch games with tendulkar in it.. i dont think i will eve be crazy about cric after he is gone.

  • on October 11, 2013, 15:59 GMT

    For me the first memory still stands out..i was 6 years old when i watched the highlights of his 134 vs Aus in Sharjah on TV..I was getting to know cricket then..and there was this guy banging balls in all directions...and then i remember him pointing his bat after century...and i was like..blimey this guy is so good...and then there is the 98 vs Pak in 2003..i was so upset that Pakistan scored 274 ( or 280 something) and thought India couldnt chase it..and then Sachin came out to bat against Akthar..I was hoping he did well..and then that six towards point..I was literally jumping in my sitting room out of excitement...that has to be the best memory for me

  • ABHIDAS1 on October 11, 2013, 15:47 GMT

    thank you Almighty for Sachin and thank you Sachin for all those memories. my fav highlight is from that 1996/97 tour to SA. we were down 1-0 and looking at a huge first innings deficit in the 2nd test when Azhar joined SRT at 50 odd for 5. what transpired in the next 2 hrs was breathtaking batting brilliance from these 2. they collectively took on Donald, Pollock, Klusener and McMillan. art of batting at its best. both scored centuries at a very good strike rate and we saved the follow-on but eventually lost the test by a big margin. I was privileged to see that kind of attacking batting in a test match against the very best of bowling. Apart from that, the 175 against AUS in that ODI was very special.

  • rrchary on October 11, 2013, 15:13 GMT

    Age cannot wither Sachin nor do customs stale his infinite variety. Other batsmen cloy the appetite they feed but he makes hungry where he most satisfies .One can easily attain fame, name and glory but it is very difficult to stay there forever. This is where the little master, the master blaster stands tall over others. He has not only attained greatness but continues to stay at the top level with extreme grace and down to earth simplicity. Sachin Tendulkar has been playing cricket at the international level for over 24 years and even today his appetite, love and passion for the game has not diminished even a small fraction. He has played many master class innings but to me his smashing 98 against Pakistan in 2003 world cup at Centurion , SA, stands out. Sachin's announcement of retirement after 200th test out has come as a shock to some and surprise to many as it is difficult to imagine Indian cricket - why the world cricket without Sachin. My only wish is that Indian Govern

  • akpy on October 11, 2013, 13:27 GMT

    thanks to U-tube, now we can watch sachin over and over again..like many people here, i started my career in 1989 (so, i was obviously older than sachin) and as an immense sunny fan, i was just recovering from his retirement when sachin arrived...from there on, i have gone through so many emotions and superstitions, like at times when he came out to bat, i would not change seats except during over breaks for a quick loo-break, then at other times if he had failed a few times, i will switch off TV when he came into bat, hoping to go back after some 30-45 mts and if he is still batting, i know he is settled now. Personally, i have seen how shopkeepers in kolkata selling all those sweets, used to switch off TV and get back to work, only when sachin got out - though test was still going on. I remember when Cricinfo's servers went bust due to traffic when sachin was batting !! So many knocks - assaulting Mcgrath in Nairobi on a juicy pitch was one of my favorites

  • Yog on October 11, 2013, 12:27 GMT

    My craze for Sachin started when i was 5 year old... It was the debut series against Pakistan and in those i remember in Post Match Highlight show Narotam Puri described Sachin and a Photo of him was shown on TV... Since then my craze for Sachin grew more and more.... The Master blaster is the God of cricket with a flawless technique remarkable consistency and constant urge to answer his critics with his willow... Wishing Sachin will sign off in style against West Indies and make everyone feel he is still the same Sachin of 1989...

  • arunonline47 on October 11, 2013, 12:16 GMT

    The 137 Vs Srilanka in the 1996 world cup ripping apart sri lankan bowlers... wow a nation was gripped with joy even though India lost... Grew up with Sachin and watching sports will not be as exciting as before

  • on October 11, 2013, 12:07 GMT

    Finding out about his (then) World Record 200 against South Africa in the ODI in 2010, on a cruise ship somewhere near Vietnam, from a cricket-crazy Indian chef on-board, and on a table where my fellow diners were equally cricket-crazy Aussies and Kiwis! At least they were happy it happened against the Saffas!

  • on October 11, 2013, 11:18 GMT

    my favourite is his 143 in the qualifying match in sharjah, 1998 on the day of desert storm

  • Amit_13 on October 11, 2013, 9:15 GMT

    Here's another... South Africa tour, December 2010-11... I am a Mumbai boy now going through life in the UK.... I am going home for the Christmas break. Freak snowfall and the entire UK grinds to a halt. I am on one of the first flights to be cancelled that day... (Day 1) I am stuck at the airport, then day 2 when I have enough and book a hotel nearby and slump in bed. Bad weather on day three and I am having breakfast and recognise the noises behind me in the hotel... the cricket was on on a biiiiig screen... And Tendulkar was battling to his 50'th (no idea what day of match). I remember nothing of the day, except the snow everywhere, no people, no traffic... just me in a hotel peering over my laptop watching cricket alone. Day 4, another monumental struggle at the airport, I find a seat on a flight AND I meet my girl friend to be at the airport, Day 5, we end up sitting together through some weird coincidence... the story continues for me. His career = mile marker for my life!!!

  • vk6848 on October 11, 2013, 9:04 GMT

    Batting, there are so many, but what I remember most vividly is a young boy running full stretch to his right at long off, was it at Edgbaston some 20+ years ago?, and pulling off a wonderful one handed catch. He did not jump up and down then, or ever after despite many scintillating successes- Vasanth Kumar

  • DipsoManiac on October 11, 2013, 8:59 GMT

    Sachin has been the only constant in my life.I was a 10 year old kid when he made his debut.Since then I've experienced everything from teenage problems,infatuations,relationships,friendships,depression,freedom of college life,joy of getting my first job,falling in love,living in 10 different cities,pain of losing someone close and pleasure of becoming a parent.I can relate to all phases of his career,starting as a carefree kid who thinks everything is possible,to growing up n realizing his responsibility,losing innocence during that match fixing scandal,realizing that he can only do his best,having self doubts ,dealing with criticism and failure.Somehow,Sachin is the thread that still connects me to that 10 year old kid.My favorite memory of Sachin is his interview on his return from Pak after hitting Qadir for those famous 6s.He was a innocent,carefree dreamer,just like me.We both have come a long way since and with him retiring,we both will be stepping into a new uncertain phase.

  • on October 11, 2013, 8:12 GMT

    I was 7 years old when Sachin debut against Pakistan , since then i found a unique relation between my heart and sachin's batting.. and i am sure millions of people would have the same .. Whenever he is on strike , my heart's behaviour is pretty much out of my control .. Its pounding so fast .. that even i could hear my own heart beat .. But as soon as he is at non striker's end..Strange but true..my heart beat is normal... 22 yards make such a difference.. thats interesting.. :-) .. Our Era would be called as Sachin's Era undoubtedly.. but i am not able to take it that once again in this winter ( last winter he left one-dayers) , The SUN is going to set finally .. THE GOD of Cricket is bidding us good-bye..By reading different people's comment .. i am not able to hold my tears.... I believe everybody has the same feeling like me.. I wish Sachin : the Player , the Human and the ambassador of the Game .. all the best ..

  • on October 11, 2013, 7:59 GMT

    I am a big cricket fan, but there has been very few occasions where I am glued to the television during an entire ODI match. Not even during the famous wins against Australia at Sharjah, or for that matter the World Cup finals 2011. However, there was this one match, on 24th February 2010, in Gwalior, against a top class team, South Africa, which I happened to watch without even blinking and I thank heavens now for the fact that I decided to watch it completely. I have never seen an innings so complete as this. A superlative display of power, timing and placement, Sachin Tendulkar was not only in the zone, but he owned the zone. The bowlers would throw at him with everything, but he was not to be out on that day, and if that wasn't enough, he would dispatch everything with the arrogance of a typhoon and yet be so calm and cool as the ocean. The record was bound to be set and the first 200 by a batsman in an ODI innings was seen.

  • bijendrasinha on October 11, 2013, 7:34 GMT

    there r many things which keeps sachin way ahead of others not just his contemporary players bt the ones who came before him as well.. his poise nd ability to cope with the amount of xpectation he had nd transform them into performance is smthing u can't associate with any player in the History of the game.. Yes, there were Sir Don, Sir Richards, Sir Sobbers, Gavaskar, Lara, Ponting, Dravid bt no one could match in absorbing the burden nd transforming them into performance in which not just one person's bt entire nation's lyfe came to standstill..thre was something incredibly mysterious in his personna beyond the limits of arguments which connected our lyfe's with his..our interests wth his..when he was in prolific run there was nothing more exemplary than those exquisite drives..nd when he got out there nothing more bitter painful than that...for understanding Sachin Tendulkar one have to visit the streets of India..where every kid's posture while batting resembles to Sachin..

  • KishorKumar25 on October 11, 2013, 6:30 GMT

    My Favourite Sachin moment was when he smashed 90 odd runs against Pak pace attack of Wasim,Waquar and Akthar in 2003 Worldcup, SA.

    Thank you Sachin, you made my life.

  • ankurc_27 on October 11, 2013, 6:19 GMT

    There are not many things I can leave out when describing my Tendulkar moment. I was born in 1987 and statred follwoing the Little Master from 1996 WC onwards. There are several moments... Those lofted drives agaisnt Akram and Co. in Chennai.... Constant running to the umpire during Kumble's Kotla test.... or the anguish on his face when ever he got out..... But if something specific needs to be pointed out then these are few of MY TENDULKAR MOMENTS.... 1. That Lofted Cut in 2003 against Akhtar 2. WC 2011 trophy...... 3. The Look to Heaven after another Century.... 4. and His reception at Wimbledon every Year during the Final weekend....

  • on October 11, 2013, 5:09 GMT

    Can you really count so many.I right away became Sachin fan when he launched Mushi and Abdul Qadir to cleaners in that exhibition match.That was the very first time I saw him on screen.Before that I had heard about his credentials in domestic matches.Mind you I was just 10 then.But till this day,I am his biggest fan.He had the habit of single handedly winning matches for India in 90s.

    In our dismal 92 WC compaign,the 2 matches that we won had SRT as MOM.The Hero cup semis against SA,incredible run in 96 wc,that terrific series against Aussied in 98,that knock in a loosing cause against Saqqi and Wasim in Blore 99.Will not look at this accomplishments post 2000,as there were more match winners in those times.But SRT,you are a gem.And co-incidentally my interest in cricket has slowly diminished after your ODI retirement.With your test retirement,I am not sure how much more motivation I will have.

  • on October 11, 2013, 4:40 GMT

    Being a Pakistani, born in 1980's , never liked him, always thought Saeed Anwar is better or Lara is better. The memories of Shoaib AKhtar getting Golden Duck in Calcutta, or Wasim AKram foxing with a slow bowl, or Saqlain's moment is Banglore were broader than Sachin. But ah! The Sachin proved him above others, by his being a team man, a symbol of consistancy, by respecting others, by carrying the hopes of a nation. He proved himself. He is a role model for each of Subcontinent, atleast for all sportsman. Salute to you Sachin though i always mind your rund against Pakistan.

  • Vivekaks on October 11, 2013, 4:11 GMT

    My favorite moment lasted an entire 24 years...but to single out, i would say couple of them...2003 world Cup Sachins square leg six off Caddick, i had never seen ball travel faster over that region and it made it sweeter given the Poms had said not so great things abt Sachin before the match.

    The Six off Shoaib over point, left me in awe, never seen Sachin bat like that...and that too against Shoaib, who was long touted as his nemesis.

    And the saddest came in the same world cup. I laughed so that i cud suppress my sadness... Love you Sach!!

  • on October 11, 2013, 3:54 GMT

    I rememberstaying up late on a school night to watch the 2003 world cup final, and Australia made 350+ batting first. It wasn't until Sachin was out in the first over of the run chase that I actually thought we were favourites. Every time he came to the crease against the aussies i would immediately become nervous for the team, fully expecting another chanceless ton to come up. easily the greatest of his generation, and one of the first picked in any all-time XI.

  • on October 11, 2013, 3:54 GMT

    I rememberstaying up late on a school night to watch the 2003 world cup final, and Australia made 350+ batting first. It wasn't until Sachin was out in the first over of the run chase that I actually thought we were favourites. Every time he came to the crease against the aussies i would immediately become nervous for the team, fully expecting another chanceless ton to come up. easily the greatest of his generation, and one of the first picked in any all-time XI.

  • Vivekaks on October 11, 2013, 4:11 GMT

    My favorite moment lasted an entire 24 years...but to single out, i would say couple of them...2003 world Cup Sachins square leg six off Caddick, i had never seen ball travel faster over that region and it made it sweeter given the Poms had said not so great things abt Sachin before the match.

    The Six off Shoaib over point, left me in awe, never seen Sachin bat like that...and that too against Shoaib, who was long touted as his nemesis.

    And the saddest came in the same world cup. I laughed so that i cud suppress my sadness... Love you Sach!!

  • on October 11, 2013, 4:40 GMT

    Being a Pakistani, born in 1980's , never liked him, always thought Saeed Anwar is better or Lara is better. The memories of Shoaib AKhtar getting Golden Duck in Calcutta, or Wasim AKram foxing with a slow bowl, or Saqlain's moment is Banglore were broader than Sachin. But ah! The Sachin proved him above others, by his being a team man, a symbol of consistancy, by respecting others, by carrying the hopes of a nation. He proved himself. He is a role model for each of Subcontinent, atleast for all sportsman. Salute to you Sachin though i always mind your rund against Pakistan.

  • on October 11, 2013, 5:09 GMT

    Can you really count so many.I right away became Sachin fan when he launched Mushi and Abdul Qadir to cleaners in that exhibition match.That was the very first time I saw him on screen.Before that I had heard about his credentials in domestic matches.Mind you I was just 10 then.But till this day,I am his biggest fan.He had the habit of single handedly winning matches for India in 90s.

    In our dismal 92 WC compaign,the 2 matches that we won had SRT as MOM.The Hero cup semis against SA,incredible run in 96 wc,that terrific series against Aussied in 98,that knock in a loosing cause against Saqqi and Wasim in Blore 99.Will not look at this accomplishments post 2000,as there were more match winners in those times.But SRT,you are a gem.And co-incidentally my interest in cricket has slowly diminished after your ODI retirement.With your test retirement,I am not sure how much more motivation I will have.

  • ankurc_27 on October 11, 2013, 6:19 GMT

    There are not many things I can leave out when describing my Tendulkar moment. I was born in 1987 and statred follwoing the Little Master from 1996 WC onwards. There are several moments... Those lofted drives agaisnt Akram and Co. in Chennai.... Constant running to the umpire during Kumble's Kotla test.... or the anguish on his face when ever he got out..... But if something specific needs to be pointed out then these are few of MY TENDULKAR MOMENTS.... 1. That Lofted Cut in 2003 against Akhtar 2. WC 2011 trophy...... 3. The Look to Heaven after another Century.... 4. and His reception at Wimbledon every Year during the Final weekend....

  • KishorKumar25 on October 11, 2013, 6:30 GMT

    My Favourite Sachin moment was when he smashed 90 odd runs against Pak pace attack of Wasim,Waquar and Akthar in 2003 Worldcup, SA.

    Thank you Sachin, you made my life.

  • bijendrasinha on October 11, 2013, 7:34 GMT

    there r many things which keeps sachin way ahead of others not just his contemporary players bt the ones who came before him as well.. his poise nd ability to cope with the amount of xpectation he had nd transform them into performance is smthing u can't associate with any player in the History of the game.. Yes, there were Sir Don, Sir Richards, Sir Sobbers, Gavaskar, Lara, Ponting, Dravid bt no one could match in absorbing the burden nd transforming them into performance in which not just one person's bt entire nation's lyfe came to standstill..thre was something incredibly mysterious in his personna beyond the limits of arguments which connected our lyfe's with his..our interests wth his..when he was in prolific run there was nothing more exemplary than those exquisite drives..nd when he got out there nothing more bitter painful than that...for understanding Sachin Tendulkar one have to visit the streets of India..where every kid's posture while batting resembles to Sachin..

  • on October 11, 2013, 7:59 GMT

    I am a big cricket fan, but there has been very few occasions where I am glued to the television during an entire ODI match. Not even during the famous wins against Australia at Sharjah, or for that matter the World Cup finals 2011. However, there was this one match, on 24th February 2010, in Gwalior, against a top class team, South Africa, which I happened to watch without even blinking and I thank heavens now for the fact that I decided to watch it completely. I have never seen an innings so complete as this. A superlative display of power, timing and placement, Sachin Tendulkar was not only in the zone, but he owned the zone. The bowlers would throw at him with everything, but he was not to be out on that day, and if that wasn't enough, he would dispatch everything with the arrogance of a typhoon and yet be so calm and cool as the ocean. The record was bound to be set and the first 200 by a batsman in an ODI innings was seen.

  • on October 11, 2013, 8:12 GMT

    I was 7 years old when Sachin debut against Pakistan , since then i found a unique relation between my heart and sachin's batting.. and i am sure millions of people would have the same .. Whenever he is on strike , my heart's behaviour is pretty much out of my control .. Its pounding so fast .. that even i could hear my own heart beat .. But as soon as he is at non striker's end..Strange but true..my heart beat is normal... 22 yards make such a difference.. thats interesting.. :-) .. Our Era would be called as Sachin's Era undoubtedly.. but i am not able to take it that once again in this winter ( last winter he left one-dayers) , The SUN is going to set finally .. THE GOD of Cricket is bidding us good-bye..By reading different people's comment .. i am not able to hold my tears.... I believe everybody has the same feeling like me.. I wish Sachin : the Player , the Human and the ambassador of the Game .. all the best ..

  • DipsoManiac on October 11, 2013, 8:59 GMT

    Sachin has been the only constant in my life.I was a 10 year old kid when he made his debut.Since then I've experienced everything from teenage problems,infatuations,relationships,friendships,depression,freedom of college life,joy of getting my first job,falling in love,living in 10 different cities,pain of losing someone close and pleasure of becoming a parent.I can relate to all phases of his career,starting as a carefree kid who thinks everything is possible,to growing up n realizing his responsibility,losing innocence during that match fixing scandal,realizing that he can only do his best,having self doubts ,dealing with criticism and failure.Somehow,Sachin is the thread that still connects me to that 10 year old kid.My favorite memory of Sachin is his interview on his return from Pak after hitting Qadir for those famous 6s.He was a innocent,carefree dreamer,just like me.We both have come a long way since and with him retiring,we both will be stepping into a new uncertain phase.