August 21, 2000

4th Test, England v West Indies, Statistical highlights

  • It was the 1508th Test in cricket history.

  • It was the 772nd Test for England and 363rd for West Indies.

  • It was the 125th Test match between these two sides (68th on English soil).

  • Umpires Doug Cowie and George Sharp officiated in their 18th and 12th Test respectively.

  • Alec Stewart was playing his 50th Test as a keeper. He became the fifth Englishman after Alan Knott (95), Godfrey Evans (91), Bob Taylor (57), and Jack Russell (54) and the 16th keeper in Test cricket to do so.

  • Five batsmen (Adrian Griffith, Wavell Hinds, Nixon McLean, Curtly Ambrose and Rion King) were out without scoring in West Indies' second innings. This provided the fourth instance for West Indies and 24th in all when five batsmen failed to open their account in an innings. The other three occasions for West Indies were against Pakistan at Karachi and at Dacca (now Dhaka) in 1958-59 and against New Zealand at Christchurch in 1979-80. It was the seventh time when this record was made against England. Incidentally the Test record of most ducks is jointly held by Pakistan and South Africa. Six batsmen from both these sides were dismissed on duck in one innings.

  • West Indies' second innings lasted for only 26.2 overs (158 balls), which is the third shortest innings for West Indies and 29th in all Tests in terms of balls. West Indies was bowled out in only 115 balls by an Australian pace attack in Port-of-Spain Test in 1998-99 and in 153 balls by Pakistani bowlers at Faislabad in 1986-87. However these are nowhere near the Test record, which stands on the name of South Africa, who were routed in only 12.3 six ball-overs (75 balls) against England at Birmingham in 1924.

  • West Indies' two innings in the Test lasted for only 450 legitimate balls-18th worst performance by any side in Test cricket. The accompanying table has complete details:

    Overs     Balls    Countries      Scores    Venue              Season
    

    49.3 (5) 248 SA v Eng 93 & 30 Port Elizabeth 1895-96 75.3 (4) 303 SA v Eng 47 & 43 Cape Town 1888-89 54.1 (6) 325 Eng v Aus 61 & 101 Melbourne 1903-04 54.5 (6) 329 SA v Aus 36 & 45 Melbourne 1931-32 83.3 (4) 335 Aus v Eng 81 & 70 Manchester 1888 58.1 (6) 349 Ind v Eng 58 & 82 Manchester 1952 61.0 (6) 366 Aus v Eng 122 & 111 Melbourne 1903-04 97.0 (4) 388 Eng v Aus 53 & 62 Lord's 1888 80.1 (5) 401 SA v Eng 177 & 35 Cape Town 1898-99 101.0 (4) 404 Aus v Eng 116 & 60 Lord's 1888 68.0 (6) 408 Eng v Aus 65 & 72 Sydney 1894-95 68.5 (6) 413 Zim v Eng 83 & 123 Lord's 2000 71.2 (6) 428 NZ v Aus 42 & 54 Wellington 1945-46 107.1(4) 429 Aus v Eng 42 & 82 Sydney 1887-88 73.2 (6) 440 Ind v SA 100 & 66 Durban 1996-97 74.2 (6) 446 Eng v WI 147 & 89 Birmingham 1995 89.4 (5) 449 SA v Eng 151 & 134 Johannesburg 1895-96 75.0 (6) 450 WI v Eng 172 & 61 Leeds 2000

  • Andrew Caddick captured four wickets in his tenth over (23rd of the innings) in West Indies' second innings. The sequence:

    1st ball           RD Jacobs lbw b                 1
    2nd ball           no run, no wicket (NAM McLean )
    3rd ball           NAM McLean b                    0
    4th ball           CEL Ambrose b                   0
    5th ball           no run,no wicket (RD King)
    6th ball           no ball (RD King)
    7th ball           RD King b                       0
    

    He became the sixth bowler in Test annals to take four wickets in one over after England's Maurice Allom (v New Zealand, Christchurch, 1929-30), Ken Cranston (v South Africa, Leeds, 1947), Fred Titmus (v New Zealand, Leeds, 1965), Chris Old (v Pakistan, Birmingham, 1978) and Pakistan's Wasim Akram (v West Indies, Lahore, 1990-91).

  • Caddick's second innings figures (5-14) are the second best by a bowler capturing exactly five wickets in an innings against West Indies. The record is in the name of Australia's Tim May who captured five for 9 at Adelaide in 1992-93. Alltime record is also held by another Australian of earlier era Earnie Toshack who took five for 2 against India at Brisbane in 1947-48.

  • West Indies' second innings total (61) is its fourth lowest in Test cricket and second lowest against England. Interestingly West Indies' lowest ever against England was recorded in the second Test of this series at Lord's when they were bundled out for only 54.

  • England's total of 272 is the tenth lowest in Test annals to impose win by innings margin. The lowest is Australia's 153 against South Africa at Melbourne in 1931-32. Australia won that Test by innings and 72 runs.

    Score  Country  Versus   Scores    Venue      Season  Margin
    

    153 Aus SA 36 & 45 Melbourne 1931-32 Inngs & 72 runs 172 Eng Aus 81 & 70 Manchester 1888 Inngs & 21 runs 199-8d Aus NZ 42 & 54 Wellington 1945-46 Inngs &103 runs 218 WI Pak 131 & 77 Lahore 1986-87 Inngs & 10 runs 230 Pak SL 109 & 101 Kandy 1985-86 Inngs & 20 runs 246 Eng NZ 200 & 26 Auckland 1954-55 Inngs & 20 runs 265 Eng SA 115 & 117 Cape Town 1895-96 Inngs & 33 runs 267-8d Eng NZ 67 & 129 Leeds 1958 Inngs & 71 runs 269 Eng NZ 47 & 74 Lord's 1958 Inngs &148runs 272 Eng WI 172 & 61 Leeds 2000 Inngs & 39 runs

  • The Test ended on the second day itself. This provided the first such instance of two day Tests in last 54 years. The last two day Test was witnessed at Wellington way back in 1946 when Australia defeated New Zealand by an innings and 3 runs. Incidentally that was New Zealand's first ever Test match. A total of 16 Tests have now been played which were completed in only two days. The details:

    England (101 & 77)      Australia (63 & 122)   The Oval           1882
    England (53 & 62)       Australia (116 & 60)   Lord's             1882
    England (317)           Australia (80 & 100)   The Oval           1888
    England (172)           Australia (81 & 70)    Manchester         1888
    South Africa(84 & 129)  England(148 & 67-2)    Port Elizabeth  1888-89
    South Africa (47 & 43)  England (292)          Cape Town       1888-89
    England (100 & 95-8)    Australia (92 & 102)   The Oval           1890
    South Africa (93 & 30)  England (185 & 226)    Port Elizabeth  1895-96
    South Africa(115 & 117) England (265)          Cape Town       1895-96
    England (176 & 14-0)    South Africa (95 & 93) The Oval           1912
    Australia (448)         South Africa (95 & 93) Manchester         1912
    England (112 & 147)     Australia (232 & 30-0) Nottingham         1921
    Australia (328-8d)      West Indies (99 & 107) Melbourne       1930-31
    South Africa (157 & 98) Australia (439)        Johannesburg    1935-36
    New Zealand (42 & 54)   Australia (199-8d)     Wellington      1945-46
    West Indies (172 & 61)  England (272)          Leeds              2000