England v India, 2nd Investec Test, Lord's, 4th day July 20, 2014

Bhuvneshwar writes a different history

He is not quick. He is not tall. He bats at No. 9. But he is proving a superstar for India in this series. It is not the first time Bhuvneshwar Kumar has taken people by surprise
  shares 60

Play 02:31
Chappell: Bhuvneshwar getting better and better

England had one last chance to win at Trent Bridge. India were 220 in front, seven wickets down, with still more than 40 overs left in the day. The new ball was 13 deliveries old and had just claimed Ravindra Jadeja. The match had stumbled on it's way to a draw and England knew this was their last chance of winning. Their bowlers put in one last effort. Their sound went from mute to 11. Every single delivery was ooheed, aahed, moaned and groaned. Joe Root found a reason to be as close to the wicket as possible, clapping and yapping, right in the ear of the young number nine.

Bhuvneshwar Kumar seemed to barely notice. He batted the same way right through and finished unbeaten on 63.

Allan Donald once said of Bhuvneshwar: "He is a very quiet guy, does what he needs to do."

__________________________

Sachin Tendulkar's record against debutants in Test cricket might lead you to think he underestimates young players. It is probably not true, his record is mostly like that because he has faced more debutants than other cricketers. But it is a feeling that some had. When Bhuvneshwar bowled to him, it was not his first class debut, it was his 13th game. But he did not have an IPL team. He was not an Indian age-group cricketer. He did not come from a big school, club, academy or city. There was no hype or marketing deals, he was just a swing bowler with a tidy action.

Tendulkar may not have underestimated him. But he was dismissed by him. For his first ever Ranji trophy duck.

Others have underestimated him. In fact, his parents did. It was his sister who suggested he be pushed towards cricket. Even his coach, the metronomic Venkatesh Prasad thought he would be an ideal third bowler for India. In the first Test a five-wicket haul and matching 50s was not enough for him to be Man of the Match. He is at his third IPL team. Yet somehow this overlooked, underestimated player is India's most important this series.

__________________________

219 for 6 was the score in the 2012-13 Duleep Trophy semi final when Bhuvneshwar came in. North Zone had scored 451 in the first innings. For Central Zone to make the final, they needed to score 233 more runs in that innings, as an outright win looked unlikely. Mohammad Kaif had just departed for 63, the top score so far that innings. Mahesh Rawat put on a small partnership with Bhuvneshwar, before departing for 71. All North Zone needed were three wickets and all Central Zone needed was 201 runs. The invitations to the final were all but written.

Bhuvneshwar rewrote them. He shielded the tail. Batted resolutely. Farmed the strike. Scored at a sensible pace. On 99, with his team still behind, he refused singles that would have taken him to his maiden first-class hundred, because they were not the right thing for the team. Bhuvneshwar was eventually dismissed for 128. But only after a tenth-wicket partnership of 127. It earned a lead of 18 runs. And his Central Zone went to the final.

__________________________

To be a regular international bowler these days at Bhuvneshwar's pace, you need to be something special. Just to make it, you need to be. All the academies in all the lands are not looking for the next canny seam bowler, they are looking for height and pace

Bhuvneshwar is straight. Exceptionally straight. His bat, his front arm, his strokes, his wrist, his crease position and his posture. Straight. Probably the only thing that is not straight is the the ball once it comes out of his hand. He has the magic wrist. The sort of wrist position that old bowlers drool over when leaning on bars because their knees can no longer hold them up.

It is the wrist that has got him there. Asian batsmen get their wrists festishized by cricket writers the world over, but Bhuvneshwar's wrist is not wristy, it is swingy. If he did not have the magic wrist he would not be playing. He does not have any height. He has very little pace. He is not a reverse swing merchant. Since uncovered pitches disappeared, the medium-fast bowlers have become rarer and rarer to find, like the seam of a Kookaburra after 35 overs.

To be a regular international bowler these days at Bhuvneshwar's pace, you need to be something special. Just to make it, you need to be. All the academies in all the lands are not looking for the next canny seam bowler, they are looking for height and pace. Movement is an afterthought, and by the way they think, can be taught to any lumbering monster with a fast arm.

But every now and then, a slower bowler crawls up through the broken bodies of the wannabe 90mph gang and shows the way. Mohammad Asif was one. Stuart Clark was another. And then there was Praveen Kumar.

We might never see Praveen Kumar again. Asif was the surgeon. Clark the slippery lawyer. Praveen was the stoner philosopher. The ball wobbled hypnotically. Batsmen were left wondering which way it would finally dart off. And then his seam position was so perfect, so exact, so romantic, that he also took a bit of seam as well. In six angry beautiful Test matches, Praveen averaged 25 with the ball.

Tragically Praveen was not meant for Test cricket, at least, right now. He is an artist, a poet, a self saboteur. And he disappeared. But he had a bowling partner that was like a little brother. Bhuvneshwar Kumar. They played together at Central Zone, UP and at Victoria Park club in Meerut.

Kumar the junior saw Kumar the senior all the time. It was like he had an inbuilt mentor and hero. A swing bowling allrounder who did not bowl quick enough to excite selectors. Kumar the junior also went one better than his hero, because he was a more stable person. He did not need to worry about rage to fire him up. He did not fly off unpredictably. He was the Kumar you could take home to mum, or plan the next few years around. The white knight to Praveen's dark knight.

__________________________

Christmas Day , 2012: a slight swing bowler plays in a T20 match against arch enemies Pakistan. His first over has a wicket. He takes three more. In his four overs he only concedes nine runs, yet India still lose.

England are 73 for 2 chasing 285 at Kochi. Kevin Pietersen is on a-run-a-ball 42. Bhuvneshwar brings back a ball and bowls him. Two balls later, Bhuvneshwar moves one away from Eoin Morgan who is edging behind. He had already taken Alastair Cook's wicket. He finishes with 3 for 29 and England lose massively.

Chris Gayle made the world go crazy. 175 off 66 balls. Songs were written about it before he finished it. Bowlers were used as dental floss. But in his 175, only 11 runs were scored off Bhuvneshwar. In that match, while he had to run through the remains of his bowling unit, he finished with 23 runs off his 24 balls.

In the Champions Trophy, Bhuvneshwar never bowled a full ten overs. He only got three overs in the final. But he also went at only 3.90 an over against the world's most powerful batting line-ups.

The Port of Spain's rain shortened one of the many ODIs between India and Sri Lanka. India made 119 for 3 in their allocated 29 overs. Bhuvneshwar took the new ball. He took the first four wickets. He took 4 for 8. Sri Lanka lost.

__________________________

Duncan Fletcher was a man who loved his 90mph bowlers as much as anyone. He also likes height. But Bhuvneshwar does tick his other two boxes. Movement both ways and being able to strengthen the tail with the bat. There are simply no bowlers in India who tick all the boxes, or many of the boxes. But what India has produced consistently throughout their history is swing bowlers.

In Perth, 2008, Australia took in pace, India took in swing. Madan Lal took three wickets in the 1983 World Cup final: Haynes, Richards and Gomes. Adelaide 2003 had a six-wicket haul for Ajit Agarkar. Sreesanth took another six at the Wanderers. And Zaheer Khan's nine-wicket haul at Trent Bridge in 2007 won a Test. While the world spent over a decade kissing the feat of India's many batting Gods, it was Zaheer many heroic spells on flat pitches that took India to No. 1.

Bhuvneshwar is just in a long line of swing bowlers. But of recent times, many of them have been tampered with or discarded. RP Singh, Ashish Nehra and Irfan Pathan will all retire having never got the most out of themselves or won nearly enough Tests for their country. Some have been told to bowl faster. Some have been told to change the way they are.

India is a country that creates swing bowlers, and often destroys swing bowlers.

__________________________

Bhuvneshwar's first Test was against Australia. He opened up with the first four overs. Then didn't bowl again for 60 overs. He bowled 13 overs for the entire match, all in the first innings. MS Dhoni, it seemed, had underrated him.

But when Bhuvneshwar came to the wicket in the first innings, India were only 26 ahead. He was batting at No. 10. He would make a composed 38. He would use a straight bat. He would be sensible. He would let the senior partner make the decisions. He would let the senior partner make a double century. He would let the senior partner end Australia's hopes. He would outlast the senior partner.

And at some stage during that 140-run partnership, the senior partner, his captain, must have looked at the other end at his new ball specialist from the badlands and thought, this is a man I can rely on.

__________________________

The first ball Bhuvneshwar faced came flying back in at him. India's best batsman this tour had just been outfoxed by James Anderson. The lead was barely 200. And England had the new ball that was 16 balls old. Bhuvneshwar played it with a straight bat. There was no discernible proof to say he was not the next Indian batting sensation, so technically perfect was his defence. His back foot drive off Anderson was just as correct. In fact, through the off side he was a batsman, forget where he was in the order.

It was not until he got to 50 that he looked like he was slogging a bit more. But, you are at Lord's, you are in form, why not smack Ben Stokes back over his head to bring up your first fifty? He had taken the lead from just over 200 to just over 300. Jadeja had managed to sticky tape his technique together and trust himself to counterattack. But it looked like his innings could end any ball. Bhuvneshwar's looked like it would end when his job was done.

In this series he has taken a five-for, a six-for, made an important 36 and three fifties. Almost every single time India have needed him, he has been there. He is slow and unsexy. He is not tall, or a natural leader. And he is no one's first pick.

Bhuvneshwar Kumar just does what he needs to do.

Jarrod Kimber was 50% of the Two Chucks, and is the mind responsible for cricketwithballs.com

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 20:31 GMT

    There are two kinds of cricket writers. One, the Peter Roebuck kind. This kind weaves through an unfathomable mesh of words, insights and wisdom to penetrate the soul of the reader. The other kind is what may now be referred to as the Jarror Kimber kind. The pearl kind. The kind that weaves through pearls: pearls of memorable cricketing moments, many of which are often forgotten by many, and pearls of little known facts. Little remembered audacity. Little talked about slices of heroism. Little flicks, little facts. When weaved right, these pearls fall together in a beautiful piece of mind-lace (made up that word from necklace) that, like the first kind, penetrates the reader's soul with equal aplomb leaving the reader asking for, scratch that, begging for more.-- As for Bhuv, all I say is, had Mr. Roebuck still been around, he would have probably started an article on Bhuvi as follows: Greatness 'is a state of mind and also an ability to turn the exceptional into routine'...

  • POSTED BY on | July 22, 2014, 11:26 GMT

    Any ideas how will he fare in Australian bouncy pitches where the balls are also different to what the rest of the world uses? Or is Kookabura the standard these days?

  • POSTED BY on | July 22, 2014, 11:17 GMT

    A superb article...Really well written and phrased...also well played Bhuvaneshwar..

  • POSTED BY NP_NY on | July 22, 2014, 11:08 GMT

    Well played....both Bhuvi and Jarrod Kimber!

  • POSTED BY ButchiReddy_TimmaReddy on | July 22, 2014, 10:55 GMT

    Superb article about Bhuvi... Expecting some nice article about Ishanth as well....

  • POSTED BY offnon on | July 22, 2014, 9:32 GMT

    Wonderful piece. Just like cricket is: long spells of the regular and the essential that holds everything together. Like sunrises everyday. With sprinklings of the specials at times. Bhuvi is like that, ticking on correctly, quietly.

  • POSTED BY on | July 22, 2014, 6:09 GMT

    The article is as good as the wrist of the player it describes. For me in both the matches Bhuvneshwar was MOM. He is of the perfectionist kind.

  • POSTED BY Huls on | July 22, 2014, 1:57 GMT

    Nice and well thought out article Jarrod. Your article is as simple as the simplicity of the protagonist you capture. Clean lines in both bowling and batting defines Bhuvaneshwar. Never gets ahead of himself and has the calmness and composure of someone with 100 Tests. He is the not so glamorous boy of Indian cricket, yet will probably be the most important one for a long time. Early, yet important days of his career are ahead of him. He has certainly set up some firm and high expectations for the crazed Indian cricket fan...and a very high bar for himself. All the best to him.

  • POSTED BY AtulMore on | July 21, 2014, 17:47 GMT

    Just 2 words for Bhuvi .. "Simply Gr8"

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 16:24 GMT

    Mighty fine performances from Bhuvneshwar Kumar, and an absolutely fabulous article to celebrate it.

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 20:31 GMT

    There are two kinds of cricket writers. One, the Peter Roebuck kind. This kind weaves through an unfathomable mesh of words, insights and wisdom to penetrate the soul of the reader. The other kind is what may now be referred to as the Jarror Kimber kind. The pearl kind. The kind that weaves through pearls: pearls of memorable cricketing moments, many of which are often forgotten by many, and pearls of little known facts. Little remembered audacity. Little talked about slices of heroism. Little flicks, little facts. When weaved right, these pearls fall together in a beautiful piece of mind-lace (made up that word from necklace) that, like the first kind, penetrates the reader's soul with equal aplomb leaving the reader asking for, scratch that, begging for more.-- As for Bhuv, all I say is, had Mr. Roebuck still been around, he would have probably started an article on Bhuvi as follows: Greatness 'is a state of mind and also an ability to turn the exceptional into routine'...

  • POSTED BY on | July 22, 2014, 11:26 GMT

    Any ideas how will he fare in Australian bouncy pitches where the balls are also different to what the rest of the world uses? Or is Kookabura the standard these days?

  • POSTED BY on | July 22, 2014, 11:17 GMT

    A superb article...Really well written and phrased...also well played Bhuvaneshwar..

  • POSTED BY NP_NY on | July 22, 2014, 11:08 GMT

    Well played....both Bhuvi and Jarrod Kimber!

  • POSTED BY ButchiReddy_TimmaReddy on | July 22, 2014, 10:55 GMT

    Superb article about Bhuvi... Expecting some nice article about Ishanth as well....

  • POSTED BY offnon on | July 22, 2014, 9:32 GMT

    Wonderful piece. Just like cricket is: long spells of the regular and the essential that holds everything together. Like sunrises everyday. With sprinklings of the specials at times. Bhuvi is like that, ticking on correctly, quietly.

  • POSTED BY on | July 22, 2014, 6:09 GMT

    The article is as good as the wrist of the player it describes. For me in both the matches Bhuvneshwar was MOM. He is of the perfectionist kind.

  • POSTED BY Huls on | July 22, 2014, 1:57 GMT

    Nice and well thought out article Jarrod. Your article is as simple as the simplicity of the protagonist you capture. Clean lines in both bowling and batting defines Bhuvaneshwar. Never gets ahead of himself and has the calmness and composure of someone with 100 Tests. He is the not so glamorous boy of Indian cricket, yet will probably be the most important one for a long time. Early, yet important days of his career are ahead of him. He has certainly set up some firm and high expectations for the crazed Indian cricket fan...and a very high bar for himself. All the best to him.

  • POSTED BY AtulMore on | July 21, 2014, 17:47 GMT

    Just 2 words for Bhuvi .. "Simply Gr8"

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 16:24 GMT

    Mighty fine performances from Bhuvneshwar Kumar, and an absolutely fabulous article to celebrate it.

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 16:06 GMT

    awesome sportsmanship from the young bowler,currently he is shining and will shine in future for India.welldone bhuvi great job

  • POSTED BY McGorium on | July 21, 2014, 15:33 GMT

    And here we go again. Bhuvaneshwar Kumar scores nearly 100 with the bat in the match, 6 wickets with the ball, and the MOM goes to I. Sharma, who was MIA in the first innings and with the bat. It was an inspired spell, no doubt, but I suppose the match would've been over even before Ishant bounced out Moeen Ali had it not been for Bhuvi's runs with the bat. Perhaps it's only reinforcing Kimber's point here: Bhuvi is unspectacular. As Donald said, he just does what needs to be done. Second highest run-scorer, and the highest wicket-taker for India in the series so far, and no MoMs!

  • POSTED BY Triple_A on | July 21, 2014, 13:26 GMT

    Great article, Jarrod Kimber. It's nice to see an eloquent, positive article on this site for once. As we can see from the comments, all the readers appreciate this clean style of writing

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 13:23 GMT

    exellent article Jarrod,also what i like about bhuvi is his simplicity and that he keeps to his basics and does not experiment too much on his batting and also bowling, wish him better luck for his future

  • POSTED BY CricketChat on | July 21, 2014, 12:47 GMT

    I expected Kumar to be fairly successful as a bowler in English conditions though not as much as he did thus far. However, his batting maturity is a revelation, something that his top order could learn from. Dhawan, Pujara and even Rahane (until his 100) are all guilty of not putting their heads down to construct a long innings on this tour. Kumar has definitely surprised a lot of people with his acheivements.

  • POSTED BY sreehk on | July 21, 2014, 12:39 GMT

    Great tribute to Bhuvi this article. Bhuvi in next 2 years is going to be talked as a genuine pace bowling all rounder. He will be along side greats by the end of his career. India have unearthed a rare rare talent. They should sit up and take not of this guy's arrival since he will never announce himself verbally. Bhuvi could be the most precious jewel of India for some time to come, like Queen in Chess.

  • POSTED BY android_user on | July 21, 2014, 11:44 GMT

    great article. made a good read.

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 10:15 GMT

    Great article and a very good player !

  • POSTED BY muzika_tchaikovskogo on | July 21, 2014, 9:03 GMT

    Love Mr. Kimber's articles- they are the human stories behind the players that we see.

  • POSTED BY Vivek_Gohel on | July 21, 2014, 8:21 GMT

    An unsung hero of Indian cricket team gets an acknowledgement he deserves, truly a great article. Let us pray for Bhuvi that he will not become what Phathan, P. Kumar and Ajit agarkar have turned into.

  • POSTED BY manishwa on | July 21, 2014, 8:11 GMT

    There are only two players I have seen/heard in the past 40 years of cricket who have refused singles on 99. Dhoni in a test matches and Bhuvaneshwar Kumar in that wonderful Duleep trophy semi-final. Both were batting with the No.11s. As per mental ability he is as good as Dhoni. He reminds me of Kapil Dev, minus the showmanship. Nurture him a bit - perhaps help him with his camera shyness, make him thick-skinned so that he is deaf to typical Indian Facebookers and even more stupid Indian Media, he should be India's captain soon.

  • POSTED BY Craftsman on | July 21, 2014, 7:59 GMT

    Bhuvi's Batting record this series - 2nd highest run scorer , 3rd highest average , 2nd highest number of balls faced, highest number of 50's , 2nd highest number of boundaries Bhuvi's Bowling record this series - Highest wicket taker , Best average (15.81 while the next best is 33.14 , leave alone the 1 wicket takers cook and Vijay) , best strike rate (38 and the next best is 60.8), has taken more wickets than any English and Indian bowlers while having bowled less overs than that of any of the English full time bowlers One of the greatest all-rounders in the making ?

  • POSTED BY princenag25 on | July 21, 2014, 7:58 GMT

    Superb Artcile Jarrod. Hats Off.. Cant say Mopre...

  • POSTED BY cktspirit on | July 21, 2014, 7:33 GMT

    Good one highlighting the facts and achievements about Bhuvaneswar. Just to add, he was one of the most economical bowlers and highest wicket takers in recently finished IPL too. Kudos and keep it up Bhuvi.

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 7:18 GMT

    Bhuvi , The White Knight. Great words in depth.

  • POSTED BY spant on | July 21, 2014, 7:17 GMT

    Very nice compact article!!!

  • POSTED BY rohit1550 on | July 21, 2014, 7:12 GMT

    First time I got goosebumps while reading an article....A majestic article just as our our hero Bhuvneshwar Kumar....!!

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 6:06 GMT

    Great article. The writer has brought out the shining gems nobody else remembered. Bhuvneshwar's achievements have been presented as simple facts, no hyperbole. Mr. Kimber has presented to us a man getting on with his task avoiding the erection of any edifices. A coal miner who has picked up a rare gem in the mine does not boast about his find, simply shrugs his shoulders, enjoys the pint of ale in the evening and looks forward to another day in the pits tomorrow (Does the analogy hold?). Thoroughly enjoyed this piece.

  • POSTED BY sunil_dr on | July 21, 2014, 5:51 GMT

    Excellent article. Bhuvneshwar is truly underated

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 5:46 GMT

    Briiliant Mr. Kimber ! It's somehow a lot more fun to read what you say rather than listen ! :)

  • POSTED BY OmSaravana on | July 21, 2014, 5:40 GMT

    wow wat an article. kudos kimber .

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 5:34 GMT

    wow what an article...its like poetry...i got tears while resding it...thanks alot

  • POSTED BY kashcricketkash on | July 21, 2014, 5:23 GMT

    Good article!! I thoroughly enjoyed reading it! Bhuvi is indeed like Rahul Dravid...unsung hero...who does what he is supposed to do SILENTLY. Kudos to him for pulling up great performances in England!!

  • POSTED BY ssenthil on | July 21, 2014, 5:12 GMT

    This is a really great article. Very well written and nice to read. I would like to read this again after the match over

  • POSTED BY fairfan70 on | July 21, 2014, 4:40 GMT

    Superbly written! Enjoyed reading this piece.

  • POSTED BY CrICkeeet on | July 21, 2014, 4:33 GMT

    Ladies nd gentleman, mark my words, u r watching the next ICC number 1 alrounder,... B.Kumar

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 4:28 GMT

    Well written ! Seriously !! Thanks for the article!!

  • POSTED BY ambsmams on | July 21, 2014, 4:13 GMT

    Amazing article. I had to share it with all my friends and family. Wonderful. One of the best "short biographies" on a cricketer I have come to respect and look forward to watching on TV.

  • POSTED BY TCFan on | July 21, 2014, 3:40 GMT

    Cricket+Poetry a great combination as always, Take a bow!!! a neatly written piece

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 3:26 GMT

    Brilliant! I love your writing style. Keep them coming mate...

  • POSTED BY sams235 on | July 21, 2014, 3:19 GMT

    Jarod: This is one of the best articles I have ever read, not because its about an Indian bowlder. But, because of how you took the reader on a fantastic journey. I would love ot see more your articles written such eloquently. Thank you.

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 3:01 GMT

    Great article about a consistent player.. Consistent in approach, consistent in thought and of course consistent in the results.. Just one red flag and that is Indian selectors and team management.. Just don't burden him too much as they did with Irfan Pathan.. Let Bhuvneshwar blossom slowly in a flower..

  • POSTED BY satchander on | July 21, 2014, 2:30 GMT

    nice article. always have admire bhuvi and shami - at least 2 bowlers for India who have talent and bowl their hearts out. Yes, on placid pitches where there is no swing, bhuvi will find it hard to take wickets, but I think overseas on pitches like in NZ,Eng, Aus and SA, he should do well for India. Hope we can groom more such bowlers.

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 2:24 GMT

    Jarrod Kimber Love what u does...

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 2:22 GMT

    Haven't read a better article in a long long time. You've done your research for sure. Thanks Jarrod. You should also do an article on how some of India's best batsmen haven't scored this series. Dhawan,Kohli,Dhoni to name a few.

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 2:06 GMT

    Bhuvaneswar kumar reminds me of irfan pathan in his early days, can swing the ball and bat with the tail .Some of his strokes are top class. I hope Indian team won't experiment with him and make another irfan pathan

  • POSTED BY on | July 21, 2014, 1:05 GMT

    Very well written assessment of a modest player with immense potential.

  • POSTED BY bleedingice on | July 21, 2014, 1:05 GMT

    Excellent article, a pleasure as always

  • POSTED BY humdrum on | July 21, 2014, 0:38 GMT

    Prose bordering on poetry,in the land of Shakespeare and in the language of Shakespeare. Take a bow Jarrod kimber.

  • POSTED BY kuro5hin on | July 20, 2014, 23:48 GMT

    This is the best cricket article I have read in a long, long time. The stats, the narrative, everything is simply superlative. Sheer poetry. Take a bow, Jarrod Kimber.

  • POSTED BY Cricket24 on | July 20, 2014, 23:34 GMT

    He has written some of the best cricket articles to be published on Cricinfo in the past two weeks

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 21:27 GMT

    A very well written article. It was like a poetry describing another poetry essayed by Bhuvi!!

    Reminds people not to underestimate quietness. It is shows the strength of the person not his weakness!!

  • POSTED BY kpmanicka on | July 20, 2014, 20:59 GMT

    This was a very nice article. I only wish BCCI and grass root level coaches and administrators pay heed and understand the value of nurturing the bowlers especially fast bowlers.

    During 80s, Kapil who used to be express quick was reduced to trundling due to over bowling him on dead pitches. Most of the Indian captains seem to make the same mistakes. You only have to look at the Aussies and Saffas to see how they manage the workload of their top bowlers.

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 20:35 GMT

    Waow Kimber nice work!!! I loved your following line "India is a country that creates swing bowlers, and often destroys swing bowlers." I am afraid that this will be true for Bhuvi too. Hope I am wrong. I will enjoy as long as I can.

  • POSTED BY sk8erboi on | July 20, 2014, 20:02 GMT

    Excellent piece for an excellent performer.

    One suggestion - You cold have ended that article with:

    "Bhuvneshwar Kumar does what he needs to do and just a little bit more."

  • POSTED BY nikhil_indian_fan on | July 20, 2014, 19:48 GMT

    awesome article.....hats off to you bhuvi......

    AS LONG AS WE KEEP PRODUCING PLAYERS LIKE bhuvi INDIAN CRICKET WILL RULE THE WORLD. it was an absolute pleasure watching his batting skills as England were frustrated every time he came on to bat. the time of a small player from a small town has truly come in Indian cricket....salute you bro.

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 19:47 GMT

    Cant recall a more evocative piece of cricket-writing. Mr. Jarrod Kimber, you have my thanks..

  • POSTED BY android_user on | July 20, 2014, 19:35 GMT

    B Kumar surprised both his team and opposition team with bat and bowl now he is looking all rounder now because he is in good touch. in bowling department he is key bowler for Indian team. let's see which twist looks tmrow in this test match.

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 19:30 GMT

    Really enjoyed the article.

  • POSTED BY JaranNirsi on | July 20, 2014, 19:23 GMT

    Jarrod Kimber: love your style, your research, and your writing. Great stuff! Keep it up.

  • POSTED BY JaranNirsi on | July 20, 2014, 19:23 GMT

    Jarrod Kimber: love your style, your research, and your writing. Great stuff! Keep it up.

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 19:30 GMT

    Really enjoyed the article.

  • POSTED BY android_user on | July 20, 2014, 19:35 GMT

    B Kumar surprised both his team and opposition team with bat and bowl now he is looking all rounder now because he is in good touch. in bowling department he is key bowler for Indian team. let's see which twist looks tmrow in this test match.

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 19:47 GMT

    Cant recall a more evocative piece of cricket-writing. Mr. Jarrod Kimber, you have my thanks..

  • POSTED BY nikhil_indian_fan on | July 20, 2014, 19:48 GMT

    awesome article.....hats off to you bhuvi......

    AS LONG AS WE KEEP PRODUCING PLAYERS LIKE bhuvi INDIAN CRICKET WILL RULE THE WORLD. it was an absolute pleasure watching his batting skills as England were frustrated every time he came on to bat. the time of a small player from a small town has truly come in Indian cricket....salute you bro.

  • POSTED BY sk8erboi on | July 20, 2014, 20:02 GMT

    Excellent piece for an excellent performer.

    One suggestion - You cold have ended that article with:

    "Bhuvneshwar Kumar does what he needs to do and just a little bit more."

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 20:35 GMT

    Waow Kimber nice work!!! I loved your following line "India is a country that creates swing bowlers, and often destroys swing bowlers." I am afraid that this will be true for Bhuvi too. Hope I am wrong. I will enjoy as long as I can.

  • POSTED BY kpmanicka on | July 20, 2014, 20:59 GMT

    This was a very nice article. I only wish BCCI and grass root level coaches and administrators pay heed and understand the value of nurturing the bowlers especially fast bowlers.

    During 80s, Kapil who used to be express quick was reduced to trundling due to over bowling him on dead pitches. Most of the Indian captains seem to make the same mistakes. You only have to look at the Aussies and Saffas to see how they manage the workload of their top bowlers.

  • POSTED BY on | July 20, 2014, 21:27 GMT

    A very well written article. It was like a poetry describing another poetry essayed by Bhuvi!!

    Reminds people not to underestimate quietness. It is shows the strength of the person not his weakness!!

  • POSTED BY Cricket24 on | July 20, 2014, 23:34 GMT

    He has written some of the best cricket articles to be published on Cricinfo in the past two weeks