South Africa in England 2012 July 6, 2012

I feel completely British - Trott

  shares 74

Jonathan Trott has made the most emphatic statement of his "Britishness" yet as he prepares to face South Africa, the country of his birth, in the forthcoming Test series that provides the showpiece of the English season.

Trott, reluctantly looking ahead from matters at hand, the NatWest Series against Australia, responded to South Africa's arrival in England by saying: "I feel completely British. I went back to South Africa for my brother's wedding in April last year and I didn't enjoy it at all in Cape Town.

"Every time I've been back to Cape Town - for weddings, a holiday or whatever - I've always moved my flight so I can go home earlier. It's nothing to do with crime or political reasons. I just didn't enjoy being away from home. And home is Birmingham.

"I don't mind the rain. You get some good days here. Let me tell you: when the sun shines, there is no better country in the world than England. You can have the mountains and the oceans, but May and June in England are perfect. There's nowhere better.

Trott had a strong response for those who still depict him as a South African-born mercenary, cynically making use of the England system. "Do they see me putting my pounds in a South African bank account? And the answer is no. And do they see me buying property outside England? Or planning on a future elsewhere? No. I'm thinking about which school my daughter is going to go to here.

"It's quite evident when someone is a mercenary. People can sniff it from a mile away."

In a wide-ranging interview with George Dobell, Trott dismisses suggestions that he finds it difficult to play against South Africa or that he expects to be specifically targeted by the South African team

"I don't think the South Africa team see me as a target any more than anyone else," he said. "I don't get any more sledging from them on the pitch than anyone else. It's fine."

David Hopps is the UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY hersheybar on | July 9, 2012, 14:35 GMT

    I have been living in England for longer than you Trotty and and will always been seen as a saffa. I also went to Cape Town last December and I must agree with you, all the sunshine, beaches and good food got me down too... (Not) but Birmingham of all places? lol

  • POSTED BY JM_RSA on | July 9, 2012, 12:04 GMT

    I dont have anything against KP/Trott playing for Eng. If they feel they had better opportunities to make it there, then thats ok, good for them. As to being patriotic, i just feel if you represent another country, you have chosen that nationality, therefore you should lose your old nationality (i.e. he should cancel his SA citizenship). I think that is only fair.

  • POSTED BY CricketingStargazer on | July 9, 2012, 6:58 GMT

    JG, you are quite right. The qualifying period for Englaand has gone back up to 7 years from 4.

  • POSTED BY CricketingStargazer on | July 9, 2012, 6:57 GMT

    PlumedgeXI, everything seems to suggest that South Africa, or at least their Board, just do not take Tests seriously, which may go some way to explaining their poor results in the last two years (4 consecutive drawn series before finally winning one). They rarely play series longer than 2 Tests these days (was their last 5-Test series when England visited in 2004???) It is hard to believe that their prepararion will be adequate, but maybe they think that this is enough.

  • POSTED BY CricketingStargazer on | July 9, 2012, 6:41 GMT

    I would not be too surprised if Trott does not take the opportunity to make a point or two with his bat during the upcoming series. JG, you are quite right, he does feel pretty insulted hat he is being questioned in this way and it shows in his comments.

  • POSTED BY PlumedgeXI on | July 8, 2012, 6:21 GMT

    On a different note, i don't feel SA are prepared to play England. England have just finished playing the West Indies Test & ODI's , Aus ODI's like they will be warm if not hot by the time SA get here. SA had a B team play Zim in T20 and that's it. I hope they raise their game to beat England.

    Plus on the Trott, KP, Dernbach and Keswietter: well i think England should be grateful to them. They've improved your game in England. we are happy to help you guys. I just hope Philander, Morkel, Steyn, Tahir, AB, Kallis and Amla can do the business for Africa.

  • POSTED BY sachinsjaihindustan on | July 8, 2012, 1:49 GMT

    After all that he has achieved during his time in the English side, I think Trott deserves little more respect than that. British media, please cut the crap.

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 23:38 GMT

    @Hammond on (July 06 2012, 12:07 PM GMT) Not sure re SA. Do they still have a quota system? Re KP , I'm not sure why he wasn't kept by SA. Re Trott , my thoughts are that it's a slightly different situation in that either his talent was not so obvious all those years ago or he has made very significant improvements in England. I'm not sure when he would have qualified to play for England but it wasn't like he was fasttracked into the side or anything. I mean he played a T20 for Eng in 07 and didn't play a test for Eng til 2009 and even then he was not being talked about as an Eng player in many quarters and came in when we had an injury and Key and Ramprakash were the favourites to come in

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 23:38 GMT

    I see there are a fair few comms slating Trott's comms intimating/saying he is disrespecting SA (his birth nation) . I don't understand how. He is merely saying that he prefers like over here and when he goes back to SA he is eager to get back to the UK again. He hasn't said SA is a bad place etc

  • POSTED BY 2.14istherunrate on | July 7, 2012, 13:51 GMT

    It's amazing that people bother to question they guy. If I were him I'd feel a bit insulted. Look at the records and let them speak. i reckon a lot of the comments here are put up by Sout Africans, and or two othe non English types, as well as one or two who want absolutely noone except five generations British. Unrealistic and not a little peculiar. Did I see that Alfred Rosen had proferred a comment here?Or perhaps J Goebbels?

  • POSTED BY hersheybar on | July 9, 2012, 14:35 GMT

    I have been living in England for longer than you Trotty and and will always been seen as a saffa. I also went to Cape Town last December and I must agree with you, all the sunshine, beaches and good food got me down too... (Not) but Birmingham of all places? lol

  • POSTED BY JM_RSA on | July 9, 2012, 12:04 GMT

    I dont have anything against KP/Trott playing for Eng. If they feel they had better opportunities to make it there, then thats ok, good for them. As to being patriotic, i just feel if you represent another country, you have chosen that nationality, therefore you should lose your old nationality (i.e. he should cancel his SA citizenship). I think that is only fair.

  • POSTED BY CricketingStargazer on | July 9, 2012, 6:58 GMT

    JG, you are quite right. The qualifying period for Englaand has gone back up to 7 years from 4.

  • POSTED BY CricketingStargazer on | July 9, 2012, 6:57 GMT

    PlumedgeXI, everything seems to suggest that South Africa, or at least their Board, just do not take Tests seriously, which may go some way to explaining their poor results in the last two years (4 consecutive drawn series before finally winning one). They rarely play series longer than 2 Tests these days (was their last 5-Test series when England visited in 2004???) It is hard to believe that their prepararion will be adequate, but maybe they think that this is enough.

  • POSTED BY CricketingStargazer on | July 9, 2012, 6:41 GMT

    I would not be too surprised if Trott does not take the opportunity to make a point or two with his bat during the upcoming series. JG, you are quite right, he does feel pretty insulted hat he is being questioned in this way and it shows in his comments.

  • POSTED BY PlumedgeXI on | July 8, 2012, 6:21 GMT

    On a different note, i don't feel SA are prepared to play England. England have just finished playing the West Indies Test & ODI's , Aus ODI's like they will be warm if not hot by the time SA get here. SA had a B team play Zim in T20 and that's it. I hope they raise their game to beat England.

    Plus on the Trott, KP, Dernbach and Keswietter: well i think England should be grateful to them. They've improved your game in England. we are happy to help you guys. I just hope Philander, Morkel, Steyn, Tahir, AB, Kallis and Amla can do the business for Africa.

  • POSTED BY sachinsjaihindustan on | July 8, 2012, 1:49 GMT

    After all that he has achieved during his time in the English side, I think Trott deserves little more respect than that. British media, please cut the crap.

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 23:38 GMT

    @Hammond on (July 06 2012, 12:07 PM GMT) Not sure re SA. Do they still have a quota system? Re KP , I'm not sure why he wasn't kept by SA. Re Trott , my thoughts are that it's a slightly different situation in that either his talent was not so obvious all those years ago or he has made very significant improvements in England. I'm not sure when he would have qualified to play for England but it wasn't like he was fasttracked into the side or anything. I mean he played a T20 for Eng in 07 and didn't play a test for Eng til 2009 and even then he was not being talked about as an Eng player in many quarters and came in when we had an injury and Key and Ramprakash were the favourites to come in

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 23:38 GMT

    I see there are a fair few comms slating Trott's comms intimating/saying he is disrespecting SA (his birth nation) . I don't understand how. He is merely saying that he prefers like over here and when he goes back to SA he is eager to get back to the UK again. He hasn't said SA is a bad place etc

  • POSTED BY 2.14istherunrate on | July 7, 2012, 13:51 GMT

    It's amazing that people bother to question they guy. If I were him I'd feel a bit insulted. Look at the records and let them speak. i reckon a lot of the comments here are put up by Sout Africans, and or two othe non English types, as well as one or two who want absolutely noone except five generations British. Unrealistic and not a little peculiar. Did I see that Alfred Rosen had proferred a comment here?Or perhaps J Goebbels?

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 12:49 GMT

    The way I see it re Trott and KP is that if these guys thought the opportunities weren't going to be there (or at least they'd be very limited) in SA for whatever reason then why wouldn't they want to ply their trade elsewhere? Remember cricket is a short career and if these guys have self belief but little belief in selectors etc ....

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 12:44 GMT

    @MrJiminyCricket on (July 06 2012, 18:03 PM GMT) Very well made pints there @zaragon on (July 06 2012, 20:24 PM GMT) I also thought I read an article that ECB (Not ICC) have recently made stricter rules to qualify for England

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 12:43 GMT

    @eddie_1 on (July 06 2012, 13:35 PM GMT) Come on - are you seriously counting Prior and Strauss as SA when one moved over here when 6 and one when 12 ? Were they being groomed to be Eng cricketers at that age? And many would say that Dernbach should be nowhere near the Eng side and certainly Kieswetter and Dernbach can't be described as big contributory factors as to why we've been doing well in the shorter forms of the game recently. And in UAE it was our bowlers (none of who were SA connected who kept us in the series. So realistically you have 2 SA brought up players playing tests and 2 or 3 playing ODIs

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 12:43 GMT

    @mrpfister on (July 06 2012, 11:09 AM GMT) - Maybe you're right there but in that case hasn't Trott done well for himself by bettering himself by finding regular cricket elsewhere?

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | July 7, 2012, 12:42 GMT

    I see there are a fair few comms slating Trott's comms intimating/saying he is disrespecting SA (his birth nation) . I don't understand how. He is merely saying that he prefers like over here and when he goes back to SA he is eager to get back to the UK again. He hasn't said SA is a dive .....

  • POSTED BY SDHM on | July 7, 2012, 10:20 GMT

    @Lord_Dravid - just being pedantic here but Britain only consists of England, Scotland and Wales. Northern Ireland is part of the UK, but it is not in Britain. Just telling you in case you ever find yourself in a pub in Belfast or Dublin and try to call them British - you might not find yourself welcome again!

  • POSTED BY pereirapet on | July 7, 2012, 10:09 GMT

    oh yeah, then what about his SA passport.

  • POSTED BY Hello13 on | July 7, 2012, 9:15 GMT

    People are missing the point here. This is a job representing your country. Could someone in Kevin Pietersens position represent England in anothere capacity, such as Prime Minister NO, only an English person can do that, no matter how English they feel. Also, if this was any other country, England would be the first to complain

  • POSTED BY on | July 7, 2012, 9:13 GMT

    You can see, Britain is a great country and not only even give citizenship to foreigners, but they can even represent Britain at international level or they can contest public election as well. I am from Pakistan and fully understand how much Trott loves Britain. If you live here, you will definitely fell in love with the country.

  • POSTED BY on | July 7, 2012, 6:35 GMT

    Troube is Mr Trott that some of us know both Cape Town and Birmingham, and also the respective climates of the 2 places. What a hoot! Talk about trying too hard.

  • POSTED BY eddie_1 on | July 7, 2012, 5:59 GMT

    You can be 100% South African and 100% British. Alot of people dont understand that concept unfortunately. There is no contradiction. In that context I think Trott does not need to deny his south africanness.

  • POSTED BY landl47 on | July 7, 2012, 4:27 GMT

    I wonder whether all the people here who complain about players born abroad getting jobs as England cricketers would feel the same if they (or in most cases, their parents, bringing them) went to another country and were told they couldn't have a particular job because only people born there could be employed. The name for that is 'discrimination' and it's illegal. If a person emigrates and meets the criteria for being employed, "Sorry, you weren't born here" isn't a reason for not giving them a job if they are the best qualified person. This is professional sports, not a private club. In most cases the argument is doubly ridiculous because most of the players born abroad have learned their cricket here. Even Pieterson and Trott came as very young players. I wonder, will Tahir be subjected to the same comments? He only qualified for SA at age 32 and after a dozen years as a professional, but I bet you don't hear a word questioning his eligibility. Nor should you.

  • POSTED BY on | July 7, 2012, 2:34 GMT

    Notwithstanding the fact that most of you don't seem to have sussed out that Trott's simply doing his best to get up the Saffers' noses before the SA series even starts, there appears to be widespread ignorance on the part of many on these boards as to *why* England have a preponderance of foreign-born players. The answer is simple: decades after the Empire ended, we *still* retain strong socio-cultural & economic links with our ex-colonies, which means that a great many Brits live & work in the countries in question for a while before returning home to Britain. The names of Strauss, Prior & Meaker, for example, are frequently bandied about by the ignorant as examples of 'South Africans' emigrating to England, whereas the truth is that they simply happened to be born in SA to British parents who lived & worked in SA for a few years before moving back to Britain. If you honestly believe that makes them 'South African', then, sorry, but you're simply too dim to debate this topic with.

  • POSTED BY subbass on | July 7, 2012, 0:16 GMT

    It's always been irrelevant to make an issue of where people were born. They only have to meet the qualification criteria - PERIOD.

    All the moaners on this kind of thing are just that - Moaners !

  • POSTED BY brittop on | July 7, 2012, 0:08 GMT

    @Lord_Dravid: So you'd only allow people born in a country to play for them. What about someone whose parents (and previous generations if you like) were born in Britain, but they go and live and work in Australia for a short time. This hypothetical person is born in Oz, but they all move back when he's 2 years old. He lives in Britain from then on. You wouldn't allow him to play for England? Would it be different if he was born in a non-test playing country?

  • POSTED BY mynoon on | July 6, 2012, 23:15 GMT

    Trott is British, I am British, not English. I may support the England cricket team, but I would rather support a British team. Birmingham better than Cape Town, who would a have thought it.

  • POSTED BY Herath-UK on | July 6, 2012, 22:17 GMT

    There are sentiments comparing expats with these cricketers but mind the issue comes here because these cricketers fight against their own countries of birth at international level. It is true for other fields of sports but wonder whether their eligibility period is so short as for crickerters. For professionals it is called Brain Drain why not we call Cricket Drain here. Ranil Herath - Kent

  • POSTED BY zaragon on | July 6, 2012, 20:24 GMT

    All this whingeing about where some of the England players were born is just a lot of sour grapes from countries who got used to England being a pushover. Constantly they complain about who plays for us and the injustice of England topping the ICA rankings. The qualification rules and the rankings are nothing to do with England. The job of the selectors (of any country) is to pick the best team out of those who are properly qualified to play. What if they said "Gosh, well we'd like to pick old Trotty because he's a jolly good player, but hang it, the chap's not really English is he?" Then all these armchair critics would find even worse insults to throw at us. In this country, we welcome incomers and hundreds of thousands of people from the whining countries have benefited from that welcome, which includes the right to play for our sports teams once international qualification rules are satisfied. Grow up and get used to it. You can't have it both ways.

  • POSTED BY Lord_Dravid on | July 6, 2012, 20:09 GMT

    There's a difference between how you feel and who you actually are. Same applies to KP and Morgan. KP and Trott for example are neither scottish, english, welsh or irish but plays for england because he has a british passport. Ridiculous really.

  • POSTED BY AdrianVanDenStael on | July 6, 2012, 20:05 GMT

    I don't subscribe to the somewhat unrealistic criteria regarding nationality imposed by critics of people like Trott, who seem not to be living in the real world when they suggest that there's something wrong with people born of marriages of mixed nationality, or who move from one country to another. However, reading the whole interview with George Dobell, I do think that when he is discussing his "Britishness", Trott at times, as the greatest ever British writer put it in his greatest play, "doth protest too much". I mean this particularly when Trott talks about loving Birmingham and the rain ... I can't imagine that he shares both of those characteristics with all that many other British people ... I think mahjut probably has a point about all this.

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 18:29 GMT

    Trott should just let his batting do the talking. His words made me wince a bit. They just seem over the top. He is still South African. He plays for England but he is South African. Now if we were to remove all the South African born players from the England team do you think they would be as good as they? i think we all know the answer to that.

  • POSTED BY MrJiminyCricket on | July 6, 2012, 18:03 GMT

    i find it strange when some people suggest you cannot change yr birth country or have a strong feeling for another 'home' than the one you were born in. living in the uk, which is one of the most multicultural places on earth, mainly due to our dubious past history of ruling most of the planet, i have friends from all sorts of backgrounds. some of these friends, with family in pakistan or india say, still think of those countries as their homeland...even tho they have never even visited. others may see themselves as british, tho one or both of their parents might have been born elsewhere. i have no problem with however these friends want to consider themselves because it is a personal choice and only they can decide how they really feel.

    trott has been living in the uk for 10 years, played county cricket for 7 of them before he even got a call up to play for england. he has british family, a british wife and kids, lives here full time, pays his taxes here (unlike a lot of brits).

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 17:30 GMT

    nasser was born in chennai he speaks and lives like home grown british. never said anything like this.

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 16:15 GMT

    Wellington, who was born in Ireland but preferred society once remarked "just because you are born in a stable, it doesn't mean you are a horse" Migration has been going on for a very long time

  • POSTED BY mahjut on | July 6, 2012, 14:56 GMT

    freddieforprimeminister ... here is a shortlist (but by no means an exhaustive one) of why they may want to leave: becasue they 1) can't quite make the grade in SA, 2) they haven't managed to adjust to SAs new status quo, 3) they have a slightly differnet idea of personal achievment (ie they are happy to go where competition is less fierce if they feel they will go further more quickly). many saffers who jibe, may at least have managed one or two of the above ... the thing is this is national representation so whenever i used to see Kenyans running for Sweden in the Olympics i always thought "man, those Kenyans sure can run"

  • POSTED BY njr1330 on | July 6, 2012, 14:46 GMT

    It's very simple; there are rules, and under them, you either qualify, or you don't. End of Story.

  • POSTED BY threeslipsandagully on | July 6, 2012, 14:42 GMT

    I think maybe Sean Cilliers is a little jealous.. For someone who "couldn't cut it", Trotty's doing very well for himself. Seven test centuries, including three against Australia and one against an exceptional Pakistan attack would suggest that he's very much capable of cutting it. As for maturity, maybe people should consider actually reading the interview and looking at the questions he was asked.

  • POSTED BY brittop on | July 6, 2012, 14:09 GMT

    Never understood the obsession with where people are born. I can't think of anyone more Australian than Andrew Symonds, but he happened to have been born in England.

  • POSTED BY Yevghenny on | July 6, 2012, 14:00 GMT

    . I'm fairly certain that plenty of cricketers would love to live in, and play for, Australia -- but it's not exactly a doddle to get onto the team. ======== Kawaga did it, and he's not exactly stellar talent.

  • POSTED BY eddie_1 on | July 6, 2012, 13:35 GMT

    I think this is a very important subject actually. Because one MUST admit at some level that english cricket improved due to South African Players. When I was a school boy there was an occasional player like Lamb, but now almost half the team are South Africans. Pietersen, Strauss (Zimb), Trott, Prior, Kieswetter, Dernbach...the list just goes on, including the domestic scene in UK is full of them waiting in the wings. For me it is totally clear that English Cricket is at the top of world rankings because it is essentially a combined UK and South African Team. We all know how England used to play before that. However I am not against it because nations should profit from accepting new immigrants and South Africa produces great cricketers and people.

  • POSTED BY SLAZV600 on | July 6, 2012, 13:31 GMT

    AUSinCH, really not sure what you are getting at? I am British but call myself English and hold a UK passport! What's the problem?

  • POSTED BY WillDuff on | July 6, 2012, 13:13 GMT

    Until the day the England franchise buys Kallis or Tendulkar (I can't see it wanting any Aussies), there's no story here. By which I mean: England don't steal established players - they simply choose to pick players who are elligible for the country. Any sensible nation would do the same.

    Trott had a British passport and his cricketing education was finished in England. He's English, and all you grumblers are just upset because he's got a Test average over 51 and he scored a fantastic century on debut to win the Ashes.

  • POSTED BY chrisel on | July 6, 2012, 13:10 GMT

    I don't understand why people are accused of being less patriotic when they actively choose a country that they like the best rather than just plumping for wherever happenstance determines that they were born. Surely those people who are prepared to uproot their entire lives to move to a country whose environs (be they social, political, economic or, indeed, meterological) suit them better, are showing greater loyalty to their chosen country than those who are too lazy or indifferent to get off their backsides and do anything about their lot. Seems a little perverse to me

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 12:47 GMT

    What rubbish!! You can not change you birth of place...How yo can forget your birth country, childhood,relatives, friends....

  • POSTED BY AUSinCH on | July 6, 2012, 12:39 GMT

    "I feel completely British" -- and therein lies the problem. Trott is naturalised British; not English, not Welsh, not Scottish, not Northern Irish. Yet, here he is playing for England (and Wales). It's a joke, naturalising players as UK citizens, then snapping them up into the England side. But of course, if it weren't for naturalisation, half the side wouldn't turn up.

  • POSTED BY FreddyForPrimeMinister on | July 6, 2012, 12:23 GMT

    @anuradha_d - with respect, I'm sure Trott has no doubts - he was asked these questions in an interview by George Dobell and probably feels the need to re-affirm his commitment because of the constant whining of the inane comments made by people on the message boards of cricinfo. Those Saffers who jibe at the SA-born players coming to England should look in the mirror and ask why they all want to leave your country? Equally those Aussies, Indians, Pakistanis etc who are so disparaging about the number of SA-born players in the England team might also like to ask themselves why no-one wants to move to your countries? As Trott says, it's nothing to do with the glorious British weather! (Cricinfo - please publish this so we can finally have some balance on this long-running, boring topic.)

  • POSTED BY mahjut on | July 6, 2012, 12:20 GMT

    Trott was more interesting when he never made headlines!! I live in the UK, have one British parent (norn abroad to parents who were also born abroad), have a british passport, British wife, British(ish) kids and fit right on in my British community but have never bothered to make myself feel British. either way, this is 'between series' waffle...

  • POSTED BY ed.dixon on | July 6, 2012, 12:11 GMT

    As long as they have at least one British parent or were born in Britain, that's good enough for me. By that reckoning, Trott's at least as British as, say......Stuart Clark.....Andrew Symonds.....

  • POSTED BY 2.14istherunrate on | July 6, 2012, 12:09 GMT

    Trott has merely taken up the mantle of Greig, Lamb and Smith.Why we are suddenly clucking about him seems to be a bit hard, given that he has scored a load of runs for us, as did the former mentioned,as well as KP.I am not sure that being English is about Home Office tests, or external appearances anyway but a feeling of the heart and mind. I have not cared about his place of origin since he scored that ton on debut against Australia. I am sure his team mates on seeing him in the distance do not register the fact by thinking or saying,'Oh there's that South African chap. Bit of a strange wallah, what??' it seems a bit sad to put him or KP ubnder the spotlight over this issue.

  • POSTED BY Hammond on | July 6, 2012, 12:07 GMT

    Why is South Africa losing players like these from their domestic scene? KP and Trott are better players than the current South AFrican middle order. What is happening in South Africa that is making cricketers as good as these leave their own countries for good?

  • POSTED BY R_U_4_REAL_NICK on | July 6, 2012, 12:04 GMT

    KP comes across as a mercenary, but not Trott. This interview was no doubt brought about by people constantly narking on about how many players of SA descendancy are currently in the England team. Get over it! People migrate to other countries for work etc. every day. Think about how many athletes are taking part in the olympics, representing countries they were not born in. How many white people have won sprints/long-distance running over the years, and yet the winners are mostly wearing developed, predominantly-white-country shirts.

  • POSTED BY wibblewibble on | July 6, 2012, 11:54 GMT

    @Capitalist_Cricketer: You should read the full Trott interview. He didn't come over here for selection, he came over to learn cricket and to play cricket. He was over here for a long time - full time, not just for the county season - playing cricket for Warks. He came through the Warks system.

    He may have played a few games for Western Province, but he became an international cricketer playing in England, for an English team, married to his English wife and on his British passport.

    Tahir played in leagues all around the world before settling in SA, and no-one gives him gyp. Pietersen's mother is English, Trott's family is all British, they decide to leave SA and they are never allowed to forget it. Hypocrisy is low.

  • POSTED BY CamS71 on | July 6, 2012, 11:46 GMT

    @Yevghenny: Totally agree mate. Sadly these boards are stuffed full of chippy misanthropes who have nothing better to do than have a dig at England (& the players therein) in whatever way they can.

  • POSTED BY Munkeymomo on | July 6, 2012, 11:40 GMT

    @jb633 I think that is a gross oversimplification, with the amount of international migration that goes on these days it is nobodies business but your own which national identity you choose to identify with the most strongly. If Trott feels a strong connection to the British culture and way of life and considers himself British, then in my view he is British. Just as immigrants can choose to settle somewhere and still retain the national identity of their birthplace, they can choose to adopt that of their new residence. It is more than just where you were born and your lineage. There has been so much mixing and moving over the years that I feel the whole idea of national identity is a little arbitrary anyway.

  • POSTED BY whatawicket on | July 6, 2012, 11:35 GMT

    him and KP are south african and thru a mother / passport and the regulations that were in place could be selected for england.the other guys playing for england as they were born in SA and thru the action of their parents were brought to the uk as children. but what annoys is certain countries dont get this comment thrown at them in forums. an asian guy can play for the aussies and we dont hear this. imran tahir, a guy who played cricket for more teams than any player in cricket history i suggest. who thru marriage of a SA lady and is selected by SA because of this after a 2 year period and nothing is said. the reason because SA could not produce a spinner of any class. i have no doubt at the end of JT and KP careers both will stay in the UK both married to uk females and have young children. uk i believe is the most multicultural country in the cricket world, if not the world. so it stands to be the most multicultural team aslo check other sports in the world and note birth place

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 11:34 GMT

    trott and KP moved and started to play for eng cause they could not make the SA team, they did not give it much time either by staying in the SA set up, to give themselves the opportunity to play for SA . trott is no king kallis and he knew he would not be able to get into the team if kallis was still playing. trott bats at 3 and kp at 4. i would rather have kallis and AB at 3 and 4 and day of the week

  • POSTED BY sirvivfan on | July 6, 2012, 11:31 GMT

    What a joker. Who is he trying to justify! Dislikes Cape town and wants rush back to Birmingham! He must truly be unique! Comparing Cape Town to sunny Birmigham is ridiculous home or otherwise.

  • POSTED BY SamRoy on | July 6, 2012, 11:12 GMT

    Well, this is an extremely immature interview given by a cricketer who I had thought was very mature. One might not like his/her's country of birth but speaking publicly against it especially if you are a celebrity (or public figure) for apparently no fault of the country of one's birth is in one plain word...stupid. Even the modern Englishmen won't glorify their own country like this. (If at all, especially the summer climate:) ) Well, it certainly will not go down well South African cricket loving public.

  • POSTED BY SDHM on | July 6, 2012, 11:11 GMT

    To be honest, you have to be either mad, British, or both, to choose the Bullring over Table Mountain... :P

  • POSTED BY mrpfister on | July 6, 2012, 11:09 GMT

    He's only been here 10 years! He spent the first 21 in South Africa. Grew up there, went to school there, learnt his cricket there. He even went to Stellenbosch University. They teach in Afrikaans! He should just own up. He couldn't get a regular spot in a very strong Western Province side and instead of moving somewhere else in S.A. and fighting for a place, he bailed out and came to England because he thought it would be easier.

  • POSTED BY Snick_To_Backward_Point on | July 6, 2012, 11:02 GMT

    IT clearly states in the article "Trott RELUCTANTLY looking ahead from matters at hand" which says to me that he was probably pushed for a response on the topic by an over eager journo looking for a story. Please don;t take the guy out of context - I doubt whether it ever crosses his mind except for when a journo pops the question. I'm proud of England;s multi-cultural heritage and if he's qualified to play here I welcome Trott and any other player good enough into the Eng side. Good on ya Trotty. Now go build on that 50 run average!

  • POSTED BY BellCurve on | July 6, 2012, 11:02 GMT

    What's wrong with being a mercenary? Feelings of national pride are nothing but sad delutions. Fill your boots while you can!

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 10:51 GMT

    you still have the african accent dont let down your country mate after few years you might go back home

  • POSTED BY veerakannadiga on | July 6, 2012, 10:43 GMT

    Trott's overdoing it. Is he in some sort of self doubt? The interview appears more for self than for the public.

  • POSTED BY Yevghenny on | July 6, 2012, 10:40 GMT

    It really is about time people stopped going on and on and on about birthplace, especially when these players are raising their own families in this country and have English parents/test match history within their family. If these people put as much effort into supporting their own players, perhaps their nations wouldn't be flagging behind so much and they would have no cause for complaint as they'd be seeing competitive cricket. It is such a boring subject, and it makes no sense whatsoever. Just some ridiculous idea that birth place and absolutely nothing else determines what country you're allowed to play for

  • POSTED BY Capitalist_Cricketer on | July 6, 2012, 10:39 GMT

    u might like UK fair enuff but why try to put SA down ? I see one as the mother and the other as the wife to be honest being an immigrant and settled in UK too. No use comparing either. But in terms of strict fairness, Its not fair that a person born in UK who is learning and working hard to join the End team doesnt get a chance as someone just joins in the que ahead of him just during the selection. This makes it a less country cricket team and more of a club cricket team. England should promote its own home grown players as otherwise in the longer term the local sports shall be going down the manufacturing or the england football way ie totally dominated by foreigners which means the local sports can stand on their own feet independently.

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 10:24 GMT

    What ever buddy, I grew up with you in Cape Town and you couldnt cut it there...Your just another saffa who came over to the UK who couldnt cut it in SA! Good months in May and June? If you like constant rain maybe!

  • POSTED BY jb633 on | July 6, 2012, 10:23 GMT

    He may feel completley British, but he is completley South African. I am English but have some relatives in Australia, I don't see how this would make me Austalian though. Trott and KP simply saw England as their best opportunity to play internation cricket, and in many regards I do not blame them. However, Trott and KP will always be South African.

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 10:20 GMT

    so what? if you feel completely British. Everyone feels the same way towards there own nationality.

  • POSTED BY Selassie-I on | July 6, 2012, 10:05 GMT

    great player, really shows how much is 'stirred' by the media!

  • POSTED BY Baundele on | July 6, 2012, 10:01 GMT

    Being British or South African has nothing to do with not enjoying one's brother's wedding. Trott does not need to prove anyone about his loyalty. I am not sure why he is over-trying it.

  • POSTED BY yorkshirematt on | July 6, 2012, 9:58 GMT

    The saffers don't see Trott as a target? Well to be fair there will be plenty to choose from! England's detractors may call Trott many things but one thing he is not is a mercenary (unlike a certain saffer who goes by the initials KP)

  • POSTED BY andysarmy on | July 6, 2012, 9:56 GMT

    great interview, the maturity of these guys now is something else compared to the england team of the 80s and whatever. you can verify this by tuning in to Sky sports....

  • POSTED BY anuradha_d on | July 6, 2012, 9:50 GMT

    Why make such an open statement...unless one has self doubts....or is being constantly doubted by those aropund him.........look SA borns playing for Eng is an arrangement of mutual convenience....gives better quality to Eng then they have homegrown....and gives better commercial / life quality to those coming from SA........it is what it is......doesn't require attacking.....or defending

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • POSTED BY anuradha_d on | July 6, 2012, 9:50 GMT

    Why make such an open statement...unless one has self doubts....or is being constantly doubted by those aropund him.........look SA borns playing for Eng is an arrangement of mutual convenience....gives better quality to Eng then they have homegrown....and gives better commercial / life quality to those coming from SA........it is what it is......doesn't require attacking.....or defending

  • POSTED BY andysarmy on | July 6, 2012, 9:56 GMT

    great interview, the maturity of these guys now is something else compared to the england team of the 80s and whatever. you can verify this by tuning in to Sky sports....

  • POSTED BY yorkshirematt on | July 6, 2012, 9:58 GMT

    The saffers don't see Trott as a target? Well to be fair there will be plenty to choose from! England's detractors may call Trott many things but one thing he is not is a mercenary (unlike a certain saffer who goes by the initials KP)

  • POSTED BY Baundele on | July 6, 2012, 10:01 GMT

    Being British or South African has nothing to do with not enjoying one's brother's wedding. Trott does not need to prove anyone about his loyalty. I am not sure why he is over-trying it.

  • POSTED BY Selassie-I on | July 6, 2012, 10:05 GMT

    great player, really shows how much is 'stirred' by the media!

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 10:20 GMT

    so what? if you feel completely British. Everyone feels the same way towards there own nationality.

  • POSTED BY jb633 on | July 6, 2012, 10:23 GMT

    He may feel completley British, but he is completley South African. I am English but have some relatives in Australia, I don't see how this would make me Austalian though. Trott and KP simply saw England as their best opportunity to play internation cricket, and in many regards I do not blame them. However, Trott and KP will always be South African.

  • POSTED BY on | July 6, 2012, 10:24 GMT

    What ever buddy, I grew up with you in Cape Town and you couldnt cut it there...Your just another saffa who came over to the UK who couldnt cut it in SA! Good months in May and June? If you like constant rain maybe!

  • POSTED BY Capitalist_Cricketer on | July 6, 2012, 10:39 GMT

    u might like UK fair enuff but why try to put SA down ? I see one as the mother and the other as the wife to be honest being an immigrant and settled in UK too. No use comparing either. But in terms of strict fairness, Its not fair that a person born in UK who is learning and working hard to join the End team doesnt get a chance as someone just joins in the que ahead of him just during the selection. This makes it a less country cricket team and more of a club cricket team. England should promote its own home grown players as otherwise in the longer term the local sports shall be going down the manufacturing or the england football way ie totally dominated by foreigners which means the local sports can stand on their own feet independently.

  • POSTED BY Yevghenny on | July 6, 2012, 10:40 GMT

    It really is about time people stopped going on and on and on about birthplace, especially when these players are raising their own families in this country and have English parents/test match history within their family. If these people put as much effort into supporting their own players, perhaps their nations wouldn't be flagging behind so much and they would have no cause for complaint as they'd be seeing competitive cricket. It is such a boring subject, and it makes no sense whatsoever. Just some ridiculous idea that birth place and absolutely nothing else determines what country you're allowed to play for