England v West Indies, 1st Twenty20, The Oval September 23, 2011

Bopara stars as England cruise to victory

41

England 128 for 0 (Hales 62*, Kieswetter 58*) beat West Indies 125 (Bopara 4-10) by ten wickets
Scorecard and ball-by-ball details

Ravi Bopara produced England's best Twenty20 figures of 4 for 10 in 3.4 overs, before Craig Kieswetter and Alex Hales eased along to a chanceless partnership of 128 in 15.4 overs, as West Indies crashed and burned after a flying start to their two-match stop-over series at The Oval, and ended up being routed by ten wickets - an exact reversal of the scoreline in Allen Stanford's US$20million shootout in Antigua three years ago.

The prize on this occasion is somewhat less remarkable, but with the defence of England's World Twenty20 crown now less than a year away, England's youth-orientated team outclassed their transient opponents and confirmed the impression laid out by their stand-in captain, Graeme Swann, that many of these same names are likely to be in the starting line-up in Sri Lanka next September.

England were made to battle for control of this contest, but not for very long. In front of a raucous crowd of 17,417, the West Indies openers Dwayne Smith and Johnson Charles battered 42 runs in the first four overs, including 22 from a startled Tim Bresnan, who could find no response as Smith cleared his front leg for a series of baseball mows over deep midwicket.

However, Swann's response was to take the pace off the ball against an agricultural line-up that possessed plenty men capable of clearing the ropes, but few who were quite as adept at working the gaps. Samit Patel produced a ripper to clip the top of Smith's off stump, before Marlon Samuels - the recognised class act in their batting line-up - was bowled through the gate by a beauty from Swann.

Thereafter, West Indies' innings lacked direction. Charles battered Patel for one more six over long-on but then perished to his very next ball as he miscued an identical swipe to Steven Finn, and the only other man to reach double figures was Hyatt, who ruined Swann's excellent figures by slapping his final over for 17, but was seventh out for 28, as Bopara produced an excellent change-up in pace to bowl him neck and crop.

Jade Dernbach's variations impressed at the death, as he conceded 20 runs in four overs of typically inventive slower balls and yorkers, but it was Bopara's wicket-to-wicket discipline that really scuppered the innings. West Indies lost two wickets in two balls in back-to-back Bopara overs, as his stump-rattling line and length was allied to two sharp pieces of fielding - first when Christopher Barnwell was brilliantly snaffled by Kieswetter, one-handed to his right, and then when Andre Russell was run out by a flat throw from the boundary from Ben Stokes.

Devendra Bishoo was also run out, in his case for a first-ball duck as Jos Buttler pinged down his stumps from gully, moments after Dernbach had nailed the keeper Dervin Christian with a perfectly directed yorker. But fittingly, it was Bopara who wrapped up the innings with two balls left unused, as West Indies' captain Darren Sammy attempted a mow over midwicket and picked out Jonny Bairstow with a top-edge.

In the field, Sammy was uninspired, with his first ball of the innings a gimme that Hales carved through point for four, and his team was largely insipid. Bishoo let an early boundary roll through his hands at extra cover, and England were able to bash along to 52 for 0 in the six-over Powerplay without even a hint of spin in the offing.

Bishoo, the ICC Emerging Player of the Year, finally emerged in the eighth over, when England were already halfway to their target, but his tidy spell of 0 for 28 in four overs could not transform a one-sided canter. Hales brought up his first fifty for England from an impressive 36 balls, including one monstered six over backward square leg off Russell, while Kieswetter was scarcely any more tardy in taking 43 balls for his own milestone.

Andrew Miller is UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Rajesh.Kumar on September 26, 2011, 1:27 GMT

    In the limited over matches played this summer, England game plan was simple: win the toss and field. Let the rain arrive when they bat, so that the ball softens, and the opposition bowlers become irrelevant. This plan, though brilliant in its simplicity, has two drawbacks: (a) what if you lose the toss, or (b) what if the rain doesn't arrive? Although, England's luck with the toss continued in this T20 also, but the part (b) of the plan simply didn't happen, and the results are there for everyone to see. When batting second becomes part of a team's winning strategy, then I would say that their coaching has become very mono-dimensional.

  • duck_and_cover on September 25, 2011, 10:25 GMT

    @rajesh.kumar: 'The most mysterious thing here is how come England has won the toss six times in a row. All the laws of probability are being violated here.'

    You obviously know nothing about mathematical probability. Try reading this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gambler's_fallacy

  • 5wombats on September 25, 2011, 7:14 GMT

    I see the trolls are out and about again....@Rajesh.Kumar; "I am sure that India would have won those games quite comfortably...." fact is - they didn't though did they. Please give it a rest with these ridiculous comments.

  • Randy_Wilson on September 24, 2011, 18:02 GMT

    next match Results West Indies beaten by 30 Run OR west Indies beaten by 9 Wkts. This is a VERY poor West Indies Side facing a very Powerful England team. Well Good Luck West Indies you will need it de most.

  • darrenh on September 24, 2011, 16:56 GMT

    Rajesh, if England was playing india c, who are the members of india b and why didn't they play and try to avoid the whitewash?

  • Rajesh.Kumar on September 24, 2011, 15:20 GMT

    It will be very interesting to see how England fair in the limited over matches in their own country, if they bat first. So, for a change, they should bat first upon winning the toss next, because they seem to have a huge amount of luck with the toss, and are going to set some kind of a world record on that front.. Nevertheless, winning the toss should not be part of their strategy, because one day their luck with the toss will surely run out. As far as India matches are concerned, England won all their matches batting second, and won them by D/L method after the ball had been softened by the rain. Even then the Indian C team, which was missing 7 players from its WC final, gave them a tough time. And, I am sure that India would have won those games quite comfortably if they had batted second. Batting becomes quite easy when the opposition bowls at you with a wet ball, because then the ball just travels straight, without any swing, seam, or spin.

  • ashes61 on September 24, 2011, 14:44 GMT

    Agree with Nutcutlet. As England get better, so the matches have become far less competitive. Who would have thought the time would come when we could easily lend one each of our Test bowlers to S Africa, Australia, SL and India and still comfortably beat all comers with what we have left? As India free-fall down the rankings in the next few months & SL continue to experience serious problems (and sadly so) we'll see Australia move up gradually, but only on the strength of poor opposition, such as in their forthcoming series v India. They may get to 3rd place, but there is now an even bigger gulf (not just a gap) between ENG & OZ than there was during the recent Ashes. SA can still offer a challenge, but only Steyn really threatens, & batting replacements will soon be needed. Tiime for an ENG 2nd XI to enter the rankings, if only to provide some decent competition for England 1sts. Don't think it'll be long before ENG are top of the ODI tree, to go with their Test & T20 positions.

  • mahdyh on September 24, 2011, 14:41 GMT

    @ Rajesh.Kumar. Budddy, please stop making this type of funny comments (or should I say excuses?). The law of probability itself relies on probability, and reality may easily beat probability any time. And while it may be advantageous to bat first or second, you have to adjust your play according to the conditions. That's what a professional cricket team would do. The problem begins when we start idolizing some players and treat them like God and let them play when other young players are left frustrated and not groomed properly. It's time to wake up!

  • on September 24, 2011, 14:00 GMT

    der shud gayle in WI.....without him they are no match to england

  • garibaldi on September 24, 2011, 12:27 GMT

    Little suggestion: Indians who want to seek out some kind of mystical conspiracy theory behind the success of England in the last couple of years - please, just go away. If you want to comment on this article or this game, welcome! Back to the game: it will be interesting to see what Swann does if he wins the toss tomorrow. I would want to see some of these young guys bat: it's been a curious side-effect of England's recent success that batting opportunities are few and far between - think of the many innings victories in the tests! And there's no reason why that should diminish England's chances of winning: most of England's victories recently have relied on heavy batting followed by demolishing the opposition - only in the last few ODIs have they had a run of successful chases.

  • Rajesh.Kumar on September 26, 2011, 1:27 GMT

    In the limited over matches played this summer, England game plan was simple: win the toss and field. Let the rain arrive when they bat, so that the ball softens, and the opposition bowlers become irrelevant. This plan, though brilliant in its simplicity, has two drawbacks: (a) what if you lose the toss, or (b) what if the rain doesn't arrive? Although, England's luck with the toss continued in this T20 also, but the part (b) of the plan simply didn't happen, and the results are there for everyone to see. When batting second becomes part of a team's winning strategy, then I would say that their coaching has become very mono-dimensional.

  • duck_and_cover on September 25, 2011, 10:25 GMT

    @rajesh.kumar: 'The most mysterious thing here is how come England has won the toss six times in a row. All the laws of probability are being violated here.'

    You obviously know nothing about mathematical probability. Try reading this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gambler's_fallacy

  • 5wombats on September 25, 2011, 7:14 GMT

    I see the trolls are out and about again....@Rajesh.Kumar; "I am sure that India would have won those games quite comfortably...." fact is - they didn't though did they. Please give it a rest with these ridiculous comments.

  • Randy_Wilson on September 24, 2011, 18:02 GMT

    next match Results West Indies beaten by 30 Run OR west Indies beaten by 9 Wkts. This is a VERY poor West Indies Side facing a very Powerful England team. Well Good Luck West Indies you will need it de most.

  • darrenh on September 24, 2011, 16:56 GMT

    Rajesh, if England was playing india c, who are the members of india b and why didn't they play and try to avoid the whitewash?

  • Rajesh.Kumar on September 24, 2011, 15:20 GMT

    It will be very interesting to see how England fair in the limited over matches in their own country, if they bat first. So, for a change, they should bat first upon winning the toss next, because they seem to have a huge amount of luck with the toss, and are going to set some kind of a world record on that front.. Nevertheless, winning the toss should not be part of their strategy, because one day their luck with the toss will surely run out. As far as India matches are concerned, England won all their matches batting second, and won them by D/L method after the ball had been softened by the rain. Even then the Indian C team, which was missing 7 players from its WC final, gave them a tough time. And, I am sure that India would have won those games quite comfortably if they had batted second. Batting becomes quite easy when the opposition bowls at you with a wet ball, because then the ball just travels straight, without any swing, seam, or spin.

  • ashes61 on September 24, 2011, 14:44 GMT

    Agree with Nutcutlet. As England get better, so the matches have become far less competitive. Who would have thought the time would come when we could easily lend one each of our Test bowlers to S Africa, Australia, SL and India and still comfortably beat all comers with what we have left? As India free-fall down the rankings in the next few months & SL continue to experience serious problems (and sadly so) we'll see Australia move up gradually, but only on the strength of poor opposition, such as in their forthcoming series v India. They may get to 3rd place, but there is now an even bigger gulf (not just a gap) between ENG & OZ than there was during the recent Ashes. SA can still offer a challenge, but only Steyn really threatens, & batting replacements will soon be needed. Tiime for an ENG 2nd XI to enter the rankings, if only to provide some decent competition for England 1sts. Don't think it'll be long before ENG are top of the ODI tree, to go with their Test & T20 positions.

  • mahdyh on September 24, 2011, 14:41 GMT

    @ Rajesh.Kumar. Budddy, please stop making this type of funny comments (or should I say excuses?). The law of probability itself relies on probability, and reality may easily beat probability any time. And while it may be advantageous to bat first or second, you have to adjust your play according to the conditions. That's what a professional cricket team would do. The problem begins when we start idolizing some players and treat them like God and let them play when other young players are left frustrated and not groomed properly. It's time to wake up!

  • on September 24, 2011, 14:00 GMT

    der shud gayle in WI.....without him they are no match to england

  • garibaldi on September 24, 2011, 12:27 GMT

    Little suggestion: Indians who want to seek out some kind of mystical conspiracy theory behind the success of England in the last couple of years - please, just go away. If you want to comment on this article or this game, welcome! Back to the game: it will be interesting to see what Swann does if he wins the toss tomorrow. I would want to see some of these young guys bat: it's been a curious side-effect of England's recent success that batting opportunities are few and far between - think of the many innings victories in the tests! And there's no reason why that should diminish England's chances of winning: most of England's victories recently have relied on heavy batting followed by demolishing the opposition - only in the last few ODIs have they had a run of successful chases.

  • professor_zero on September 24, 2011, 12:14 GMT

    jackiethepen: Sure, Swann bowled well and a lot of the young players didn't play, for the simple reason that the opening pair (including one of those youngsters) dominated. Funny to see England constantly condemned for doing well ... Ah, but you'll only be really good when your debutants all score centuries while being savaged by tigers. And not those little zoo tigers, either: real Joel Garner-size tigers!

    Look at the scorecard: Bresnan and Finn (on his T20I debut) got tanked for 40+ runs out their 4 combined overs, so, Swann aside, much of the damage was done by bowlers with a handful of caps between them. As for Bopara: he's played a fair bit of cricket for England now -- but, you'll admit, mainly as a batsman. He's bowled exactly 40 balls in T20I's.

  • bumsonseats on September 24, 2011, 11:49 GMT

    on the toss WI captain said that he wanted to bat. so i dont know whats the fuss about. he got what he wanted. dpk

  • RandyOZ on September 24, 2011, 11:37 GMT

    World T20 champions. You'd expect em to win. Even with the IPL India can't win. Hilarious.

  • JG2704 on September 24, 2011, 11:34 GMT

    Rajesh.Kumar - Thankyou for your well constructed/educated comments. I didn't realise cricket was that simple. If your theory re the toss was accurate , how come WI were milking our bowling for the first few overs?

    Seriously. Usually I'd be getting carried away but in my opinion West Indies had a similar standard bowling attack to India but without the strength in batting. The WI situation seems farcical with their top players choosing bigger paying T20 events over playing for their countrt or so it seems. England have had a remarkable summer but how they perform in India and next year vs SA will tell us more.I hope that we bat first on Sunday , just so that some more of our batsmen get a knock. Buttler has now been in 2 England sides but not got a bat.

  • Nutcutlet on September 24, 2011, 10:42 GMT

    O, for a genuinely competitive representative match! Personally, I'd like a resurrection of the old, end-of-season North v South fixture - I honestly think that the selectors would learn much more about the up-and-coming international players from such a fixture than they could from this apology for an international match. England now has so many high quality cricketers, several of whom would walk into almost any other current international side, that it seems unfair that they can't get a national platform to showcase their skills. Sport loses all of its interest when it's totally one-sided, and apart from some enthralling and keenly contested domestic competitions, the English season of 2011 has been eminently forgettable. Wake me up when the Saffers arrive!

  • gloves71 on September 24, 2011, 10:23 GMT

    @ Rajesh.Kumar TOO FUNNY!!!!!! Are you seriously now suggesting that the toss was fixed in England's favour? Mate, I have never seen such a widespread case of collective denial! Maybe England just ARE that good...

  • bumsonseats on September 24, 2011, 10:07 GMT

    i would have liked us to bat 1st and let the young guys bat. i saw that swann rightly said he wanted the best 11 to win both games. but i want to see them all play as i think this is the way to go. maybe finn to drop out and 1 of the spinners come in. but what about finn talk about a guy bulking up and the speed 94mph he without doubt the fattest bowler in world cricket and on a slow oval wicket, but tests is the way for him. this guy cannot get into the test team, but for how long. even on indian wickets could be scarey for them . dpk

  • SDHM on September 24, 2011, 9:59 GMT

    @ Rajesh.Kumar - if Bopara turns out anything like Paul Collingwood, England will be a much better side for it. And anyway, he's quicker than most of the Indian attack...

  • CricketingStargazer on September 24, 2011, 9:28 GMT

    I have to admit that T20 is my least favourite format and one that I follow with little passion at any time, but last night I did listen in, stunned, by this perforrmance. A young and inexperienced side came out and, after seeing its best bowlers hammered around the park at the start, came up with a devastating response. We have all seen how T20 suits the Caribbean style of play (witness the success of T&T in the Champions League against the supposed masters of the IPL) and how the Stanford All Stars (who looked like a side of journeymen) smashed England not so long ago. England have come on so far since then. Notice how Kieswetter, who only a few Indian and Austalian fans wanted to put in the side (and not on crickting grounds), has played a blinder in the last few games: runs, lightning starts and spectacular catches. He adds a new dimension to the side. The only down side was that Kieswetter and Hales batted so well that Butler and the other youngsters didn't get a bat.

  • Rajesh.Kumar on September 24, 2011, 8:58 GMT

    England approach to victory in last six limited over matches (5 against India, and 1 against WI) is simple: win toss and bat second. In the second innings ball doesn't do much, so its like playing on a concrete surface. I bet any team (including this WI team) batting second would have won. The most mysterious thing here is how come England has won the toss six times in a row. All the laws of probability are being violated here.

  • Richard19913 on September 24, 2011, 8:57 GMT

    On a wicket with so much turn, I felt the West Indian spinners bowled very poorly. While Bishoo's figures were not bad, he and Bonner bowled far to short and never looked like troubling the English openers who pretty much pulled every ball. For a spinner with so much apparent promise, I was very disappointed with his efforts. Swann, and especially Patel bowled much fuller and looked very threatening, and for any Test match spinner to be outbowled by Samit Patel is a worrying state to be in.

  • Silverbails on September 24, 2011, 8:55 GMT

    As painful as it is to admit it, I MUST agree with 5wombats. And, judging by the comments coming out of the BCCI, I think that there can only be MORE of the same for Team India. As for the WI outfit, they're still a relatively young and inexperienced team, and can ONLY IMPROVE. Best luck to both teams in the second T20, although with England on a roll, it's really quite difficult to see any other result then a 2 - 0 whitewash on this occasion.

  • duncanmoo on September 24, 2011, 8:50 GMT

    It is good for cricket that England are back in the came and playing consistently good cricket, it is also good when they rely on born and bred English players like Bopara. Fine England are doing well but surely it is hollow if about too many of the team were born elsewhere and learnt their cricket in their home country.

  • jackiethepen on September 24, 2011, 8:25 GMT

    The West Indies were bowled out to a below par score by England bowlers who are not newcomers and who have been excelling all year. Only Bopara can be said to have stepped up his game and Bresnan sunk a little. But these are not inexperienced youngsters on their debuts. Flower may have packed the batsmen with youngsters but they didn't get to play, Hales apart. The damage was already done. The West Indies looked beaten even before they took to the field. Perhaps everyone has forgotten that Sri Lanka thrashed us at T20 at the beginning of the summer? Swann should replace Broad as captain. We need a proper opposition to test the young batsmen before anyone can claim they are world beaters. Foolish talk.

  • RandyOZ on September 24, 2011, 7:46 GMT

    The Indian fans are so blind on cricinfo it is hilarious. Your team cannot get any worse and I cannot wait to spank Harbhjan around Oz.

  • CricketHeretic on September 24, 2011, 7:43 GMT

    Let's be fair, India but up a much greater fight then this very poor West Indies showing. On the other hand, its unfair to be judging this young Windies side just yet, many were making their debuts and like with all young players they are suspect to failures.

    What is frustrating is the fact that this West Indies team is weak out of choice rather then neccesity, lets just hopethat they get contractual and structural situation sorted out before these players are too out of form....or god forbid.....too old for international cricket.

  • 5wombats on September 24, 2011, 7:13 GMT

    @puntertakeson; LOL... No Tremlett, No KP and no Morgan and still England THRASHED india in the ODI's. I might have guessed some indians would be here with their brand of nonsense. Watching England beat the West Indies was a bit like watching England beat india in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Tests, and the T20, and 3 of the ODI's. In fact, I'd go as far as to say, considering their preparation - the West Indies performed better than india. I agree with @Lennox Jacobus - but would delete the words "West Indies" and replace them with the word "india". Perhaps cricinfo will see fit to publish this comment.

  • professor_zero on September 24, 2011, 6:01 GMT

    @puntertakeson: No Morgan, no KP, no Broad ... The England team had an average age of 24, only one player over 26, and 3 debutants. The teams were both inexperienced. One just played better than the other.

  • puntertakeson on September 24, 2011, 5:32 GMT

    No Gayle, No pollard, No Bravo. means English victory in T20

  • ali00 on September 24, 2011, 4:47 GMT

    Congratulations from me to Graem Swan Lead England to Victory over West Indies.

  • Patchmaster on September 24, 2011, 3:39 GMT

    People love to be critical about ENG - but they really are looking like a squad that has strength and depth, I actually think Swann is the better option for ODI and T20, he has a shrewd way of thinking. Well done boys !

  • getsetgopk on September 24, 2011, 3:24 GMT

    Great to see some good old fashioned reverse swing and pace 90+ mph. If they can reverse swing it in England then they sure can in subcontinent as well and will be pretty lethal. Poms are quicly turning into the Australia of past decade. Windies had no chance at all.

  • Rajesh.Kumar on September 24, 2011, 3:23 GMT

    Ravi Bopara is such a gentle trundler that he bores the batters into throwing away their wickets. On seeing his bowling, all batsmen want to hit him out of the ground, and in the process they get out. He is another Paul Collingwood in the making.

  • OhhhhMattyMatty on September 24, 2011, 0:31 GMT

    Hales, Root, Wells, Taylor, Stokes, Bairstow, Buttler, Woakes, Harris, Finn, Briggs. Future world beaters.

  • landl47 on September 23, 2011, 23:24 GMT

    Great performance by England's young players (average age slightly lower than the West Indies). Only Swann in England's side was over 26 years old. The fielding was spectacular. Swann proved a very shrewd skipper, finding the bowling combinations that were working best in the conditions and on the day. Bopara is really proving his worth in the shorter formats and has to be a member of the side in India. Kieswetter and Hales batted very well, admittedly against a weak attack- but then, England have made all attacks look weak recently. Kieswetter also kept very well, taking one brilliant catch and letting nothing by. The only downside to the whole game was that it was so easy we didn't get to see Stokes, Buttler and Bairstow, but having a chance to see Hales put an innings together made it worthwhile. Good job, boys.

  • on September 23, 2011, 22:54 GMT

    Love it Windies. Keep making us proud.

  • on September 23, 2011, 22:43 GMT

    The West Indies should stop playing International Cricket until they can field a competative team on the international stage. The Trinindad and Tobago cricket team will play more competively than the current west indies team.

  • hhillbumper on September 23, 2011, 21:17 GMT

    Not much of a contest tonight but Alex Hales showed a lot of class after getting a duck on his last outing.The young talent just keeps coming

  • demon_bowler on September 23, 2011, 20:58 GMT

    Wow! Young England certainly know how to field.

  • on September 23, 2011, 20:57 GMT

    Dear Lord... Time for England players to set records. There seemed to be no plan in the WI batting or bowling...

  • Lmaotsetung on September 23, 2011, 20:47 GMT

    Before you guys come in and criticize England's performance...Bishoo, Edwards, Sammy, and Russell are WI's first team bowlers...just a FYI :P

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  • Lmaotsetung on September 23, 2011, 20:47 GMT

    Before you guys come in and criticize England's performance...Bishoo, Edwards, Sammy, and Russell are WI's first team bowlers...just a FYI :P

  • on September 23, 2011, 20:57 GMT

    Dear Lord... Time for England players to set records. There seemed to be no plan in the WI batting or bowling...

  • demon_bowler on September 23, 2011, 20:58 GMT

    Wow! Young England certainly know how to field.

  • hhillbumper on September 23, 2011, 21:17 GMT

    Not much of a contest tonight but Alex Hales showed a lot of class after getting a duck on his last outing.The young talent just keeps coming

  • on September 23, 2011, 22:43 GMT

    The West Indies should stop playing International Cricket until they can field a competative team on the international stage. The Trinindad and Tobago cricket team will play more competively than the current west indies team.

  • on September 23, 2011, 22:54 GMT

    Love it Windies. Keep making us proud.

  • landl47 on September 23, 2011, 23:24 GMT

    Great performance by England's young players (average age slightly lower than the West Indies). Only Swann in England's side was over 26 years old. The fielding was spectacular. Swann proved a very shrewd skipper, finding the bowling combinations that were working best in the conditions and on the day. Bopara is really proving his worth in the shorter formats and has to be a member of the side in India. Kieswetter and Hales batted very well, admittedly against a weak attack- but then, England have made all attacks look weak recently. Kieswetter also kept very well, taking one brilliant catch and letting nothing by. The only downside to the whole game was that it was so easy we didn't get to see Stokes, Buttler and Bairstow, but having a chance to see Hales put an innings together made it worthwhile. Good job, boys.

  • OhhhhMattyMatty on September 24, 2011, 0:31 GMT

    Hales, Root, Wells, Taylor, Stokes, Bairstow, Buttler, Woakes, Harris, Finn, Briggs. Future world beaters.

  • Rajesh.Kumar on September 24, 2011, 3:23 GMT

    Ravi Bopara is such a gentle trundler that he bores the batters into throwing away their wickets. On seeing his bowling, all batsmen want to hit him out of the ground, and in the process they get out. He is another Paul Collingwood in the making.

  • getsetgopk on September 24, 2011, 3:24 GMT

    Great to see some good old fashioned reverse swing and pace 90+ mph. If they can reverse swing it in England then they sure can in subcontinent as well and will be pretty lethal. Poms are quicly turning into the Australia of past decade. Windies had no chance at all.