England news September 11, 2013

Ashes legend Hoggard to retire

ESPNcricinfo staff
69

Matthew Hoggard, the swing bowler who helped England regain the Ashes in 2005, has announced his retirement after a 17-year career at the age of 36.

He posted on Twitter that it was "time to hang up the boots" five years since the last of his 67 Test matches, during which he took 248 wickets at 30.50 with his prodigious swinging deliveries, becoming the eighth-highest wicket-taker in Tests for England. He also played 26 ODIs and served his home county Yorkshire and latterly Leicestershire with distinction.

Hoggard hoped to play one final season for Leicestershire having signed a contract extension last year but after a bit-part summer, and relinquishing the four-day captaincy, he has decided his playing days are over.

Big, bustling, and with the sort of energy coaches kill for, Hoggard flourished under Duncan Fletcher's regime as England coach, finding a regular place in the side despite Fletcher's love of out-and-out pace bowling.

In 2004, he began the year with a hat-trick in Barbados before helping England to an unbeaten summer against West Indies and South Africa. That winter he single-handedly bowled England to a series-clinching win in Johannesburg, taking 12 wickets in the match.

Then came the legendary Ashes series of 2005. Hoggard took 16 wickets and, perhaps most memorably, struck Brett Lee for four through extra-cover to help England edge home in a nerve-jangling run-chase at Trent Bridge.

"I want to thank all of my family, friends, my past opponents, and both Yorkshire and Leicestershire for the support and dedication that they have shown me over the course of my career," Hoggard said. "I have been inspired by so many different people and the late Phil Carrick is just one example of someone who supported me from the very beginning and I owe him a lot.

"Playing cricket professionally and, of course, playing as part of the national side is a dream that nearly every young boy growing up in Yorkshire shares. I feel truly honoured to have been given such incredible opportunities and I am grateful to everyone that I have worked alongside.

"I want to thank my wife Sarah for the immense support she has shown me throughout my career. She has always been there for me and has continued to help me to do the very best that I can for my team, both on an international and county level.

"Nothing will ever replace the role that cricket has played in my life but I am looking forward to a new chapter and the chance to spend a little more time with my family. Cricket will continue to be hugely important to me and I wish Leicestershire the very best of luck for the future."

Peter Moores, who was Hoggard's England coach towards the end of the his career, paid tribute to him: "He's been a real character. Anyone who takes over 200 wickets for England and bowls the way he did and plays in iconic series like the 2005 Ashes will be satisfied when he looks back on his career.

"He started off as a really quick bowler when he burst on the scene and steadied that down to become a lively, out-swing bowler and very successful at it. He was very skilfull and a bit like we've seen with Jimmy Anderson, he learnt to bowl on the subcontinent, learnt to bowl in different conditions and learnt how to not just bowl in swinging conditions. He learnt how to run the ball on, bowl a cutter and do different things which is always a testament for anyone who has lasted in the game over a decent amount of time."

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • HumungousFungus on September 12, 2013, 15:55 GMT

    I will agree that "Ashes Legend" is probably pushing it a bit, but that shouldn't disguise the fact that Matthew Hoggard was an extremely consistent, high class international bowler for a long time, and it should be noted that despite him often being 10mph slower than some of his England counterparts, he was always entrusted with the new ball, and if there was anything available in the pitch or the air conditions, he would find it. I think possibly even more than Jimmy Anderson of recent vintage, if there was a day when the ball was swinging or seaming, I'd have backed Hoggard to make the maximum impact. And on those days when nothing was happening, he would just trudge back to his mark, turn around, and keep plugging away waiting for the batsman to make a mistake. One of the nicest guys of recent international cricket vintage, and the sort of player you would always want in your team. It was a pleasure watching him play, and I wish him all the best in his retirement

  • on September 11, 2013, 20:51 GMT

    There was just so much to love about Hoggy. That lovely hooping away swing and the way he attacked opening batsmen is of course a given but its far more than that. The way he trudged back to his mark. The total lack of trendy or cool hair. The way he looked mischievous when a got an LBW. The air he always gave that he couldn't quite see what the fuss was about. The way he clearly had no idea how to bat whatsoever but by george he wasn't going to get out with some silly slog. It's like somebody showed him a forward defence and he decided that was all he need bother learning. Brilliant.

  • Roshan_P on September 11, 2013, 18:08 GMT

    Goodbye to an absolute legend. I first started watching cricket at around the time he was at his best, when I was quite young. Only Anderson springs to mind of the recent England players who could swing the ball as well and produce as amazing spells of bowling. And he was great in Celebrity Masterchef :) Have a good one, Hoggy!

  • Shan156 on September 11, 2013, 15:17 GMT

    Lovely bowler Hoggy. Many talk about his Ashes 2005 performances especially his batting at TB to win the test for England. Some may remember his hat-trick in Harmison's series in WI. But, personally, I remember him more for his performance in SA in 2004-2005 when he bowled Eng. to a spectacular victory after a Tresco special. To me, that series win ranks up there with the Ashes. After all, there are few teams (in fact, only Aus) that win a test series in SA. You have served your country and county well Hoggy. Enjoy a happy retirement.

  • 2.14istherunrate on September 11, 2013, 15:00 GMT

    Hoggard has been a total legend in the game. Three great feats stand out for me from Jo'burg, Mumbai, and Adelaide where he showed what it is to bowl on one's spirit. In the end I rated him the highest of the 4 fast bowlers in the England side at the time because he could just transcend the normal and pull off the sort of spells he bowled in those games and others. As others said-he would run through walls for the side. He never got downhill with the wind, but rather up the cellar steps persevering and cheerful. Total legend. No-one has ever given a clear explanation as to selection of Pattinson over him in 2008, nor why he never got another look after Hamilton 2008. sad really though Anderson has not let anyone down since.

  • warnerbasher on September 14, 2013, 2:19 GMT

    Agree with kjkool82. He was outstanding on the 2006/2007 Ashes tour. A great character and a fine bowler. All the best Hoggy from your army of Australian fans

  • Atul on September 12, 2013, 17:01 GMT

    He was a wonderful bowler but calling him an Ashes legend is a bit of a stretch. Steve Waugh was an Ashes Legend. So was Warne, or for that matter even Freddie Flintoff.

  • kjkool82 on September 12, 2013, 13:48 GMT

    As much as we will talk about his contribution to the 2005 Ashes win, I actually think Hoggards biggest Ashes contribution was in the 2006-07 whitewash. He was the only bowler that could consistently trouble the Aussies, and I will always remember his tireless effort in Adelaide. It would be scary to think how much more of a flogging England would have gotten if it wasn't for him.

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on September 12, 2013, 13:00 GMT

    Anyone who has met the man or remembers his very skillful bowling can attest to Hoggard's brilliance. A true English Lion and Yorkshire Warrior. Great innings Hoggy, enjoy your retirement.

  • Friendlymc on September 12, 2013, 12:23 GMT

    Whether great or legend, 240 wickets is no mean feat! He will have plenty of memorable performances to think back on in his retirement, not least his domination of Matthew Hayden in the 2005 Ashes. Perhaps the real sad part is the manner of his departure from the England team. He deserved much better.

  • HumungousFungus on September 12, 2013, 15:55 GMT

    I will agree that "Ashes Legend" is probably pushing it a bit, but that shouldn't disguise the fact that Matthew Hoggard was an extremely consistent, high class international bowler for a long time, and it should be noted that despite him often being 10mph slower than some of his England counterparts, he was always entrusted with the new ball, and if there was anything available in the pitch or the air conditions, he would find it. I think possibly even more than Jimmy Anderson of recent vintage, if there was a day when the ball was swinging or seaming, I'd have backed Hoggard to make the maximum impact. And on those days when nothing was happening, he would just trudge back to his mark, turn around, and keep plugging away waiting for the batsman to make a mistake. One of the nicest guys of recent international cricket vintage, and the sort of player you would always want in your team. It was a pleasure watching him play, and I wish him all the best in his retirement

  • on September 11, 2013, 20:51 GMT

    There was just so much to love about Hoggy. That lovely hooping away swing and the way he attacked opening batsmen is of course a given but its far more than that. The way he trudged back to his mark. The total lack of trendy or cool hair. The way he looked mischievous when a got an LBW. The air he always gave that he couldn't quite see what the fuss was about. The way he clearly had no idea how to bat whatsoever but by george he wasn't going to get out with some silly slog. It's like somebody showed him a forward defence and he decided that was all he need bother learning. Brilliant.

  • Roshan_P on September 11, 2013, 18:08 GMT

    Goodbye to an absolute legend. I first started watching cricket at around the time he was at his best, when I was quite young. Only Anderson springs to mind of the recent England players who could swing the ball as well and produce as amazing spells of bowling. And he was great in Celebrity Masterchef :) Have a good one, Hoggy!

  • Shan156 on September 11, 2013, 15:17 GMT

    Lovely bowler Hoggy. Many talk about his Ashes 2005 performances especially his batting at TB to win the test for England. Some may remember his hat-trick in Harmison's series in WI. But, personally, I remember him more for his performance in SA in 2004-2005 when he bowled Eng. to a spectacular victory after a Tresco special. To me, that series win ranks up there with the Ashes. After all, there are few teams (in fact, only Aus) that win a test series in SA. You have served your country and county well Hoggy. Enjoy a happy retirement.

  • 2.14istherunrate on September 11, 2013, 15:00 GMT

    Hoggard has been a total legend in the game. Three great feats stand out for me from Jo'burg, Mumbai, and Adelaide where he showed what it is to bowl on one's spirit. In the end I rated him the highest of the 4 fast bowlers in the England side at the time because he could just transcend the normal and pull off the sort of spells he bowled in those games and others. As others said-he would run through walls for the side. He never got downhill with the wind, but rather up the cellar steps persevering and cheerful. Total legend. No-one has ever given a clear explanation as to selection of Pattinson over him in 2008, nor why he never got another look after Hamilton 2008. sad really though Anderson has not let anyone down since.

  • warnerbasher on September 14, 2013, 2:19 GMT

    Agree with kjkool82. He was outstanding on the 2006/2007 Ashes tour. A great character and a fine bowler. All the best Hoggy from your army of Australian fans

  • Atul on September 12, 2013, 17:01 GMT

    He was a wonderful bowler but calling him an Ashes legend is a bit of a stretch. Steve Waugh was an Ashes Legend. So was Warne, or for that matter even Freddie Flintoff.

  • kjkool82 on September 12, 2013, 13:48 GMT

    As much as we will talk about his contribution to the 2005 Ashes win, I actually think Hoggards biggest Ashes contribution was in the 2006-07 whitewash. He was the only bowler that could consistently trouble the Aussies, and I will always remember his tireless effort in Adelaide. It would be scary to think how much more of a flogging England would have gotten if it wasn't for him.

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on September 12, 2013, 13:00 GMT

    Anyone who has met the man or remembers his very skillful bowling can attest to Hoggard's brilliance. A true English Lion and Yorkshire Warrior. Great innings Hoggy, enjoy your retirement.

  • Friendlymc on September 12, 2013, 12:23 GMT

    Whether great or legend, 240 wickets is no mean feat! He will have plenty of memorable performances to think back on in his retirement, not least his domination of Matthew Hayden in the 2005 Ashes. Perhaps the real sad part is the manner of his departure from the England team. He deserved much better.

  • DesPlatt on September 12, 2013, 12:06 GMT

    Like Ian MacIntyre, I loved the way he trudged back to his mark as Geoff Arnold , another very fine swing bowler for England used to ; rather like a man walking to his job at a coal mine . Loads of respect for him and hope it's a happy retirement

  • on September 12, 2013, 11:16 GMT

    Great to watch him in action !! mesmerizing swing bowler... Thanks for the entertainment Hoggy !

  • on September 12, 2013, 8:07 GMT

    For the small minority here who want to be pernickety about the term legend, the Ashes series of 2005 was the greatest Ashes ever, and possibly the greatest series of any kind ever. Any player on either side who played in that series is an Ashes legend, from Ricky Ponting to Gary Pratt.

    Hoggard also happens to be one of England's best bowlers of the last 30 years, and the most accomplished of that Ashes quartet by some margin.

  • Tom_Bowler on September 12, 2013, 7:34 GMT

    Matthew Hoggard; top bowler, top man.

    England missed him when he was discarded and the English game will miss him now.

    No one is arguing that Hoggy was the greatest bowler who ever drew breath but his skill, bloody-mindedness, work ethic and love of life mean he was indeed a legend.

    For those who think that their opinion that he can't be called a legend as he once bowled a leg stump half volley is of any significance; the last quality is worth more than rubies and seems to be something you lack.

  • Sarfin on September 12, 2013, 7:15 GMT

    Come on! Read the headline first. He's been dubbed as an 'Ashes' legend. He definitely is. He was one of those key player to end the dominance of Aussie golden era in Ashes.

  • ArnoldVDH on September 12, 2013, 6:55 GMT

    I think legend is a bit of a strong word for Hoggard. Certainly a good bowler, but not a great bowler.

  • on September 12, 2013, 5:47 GMT

    He is a good bowler but no way near to call him a legend, To me legends are Wasim, Marshall, Mcgrath, Waqar.

  • on September 12, 2013, 5:17 GMT

    A realy great swing bowler and legend of 21st century. My best memory of Hogard was his inswing to Inzamam at Multan where he struck him LBW where he produce a magical delivery. Well played sir.

  • MelbourneMiracle on September 12, 2013, 3:53 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster: I was always furious about your baseless comments but today I realized that you comment about Cricket without knowing much about its history and players. I can pardon for all your past baseless comments on articles since you have claimed that you don't know much about Hoggard as a player.

  • on September 12, 2013, 3:09 GMT

    He bowled superbly in India in unforgiving circumstances and put us in trouble many times. Awesome bowler Hoggy, all the best

  • dunger.bob on September 12, 2013, 3:08 GMT

    Yeah, good luck Hoggy. You were always a pain in the backside as an opposition player but still well liked here in Australia. .. The was always something old school about Hoggard. An honest days pay for an honest days work could have been his motto. The honest work was over after over of quality swing/seam bowling and the pay was crucial wickets at critical times. .. A great performer for England and a real character of the game. .. you will be missed ole mate.

  • SamRoy on September 12, 2013, 2:14 GMT

    First of, Hoggard was a fine bowler and a fine fellow. Secondly, he is no legend. To become a legend you have to the best player for your team against the best in the world for a few series. He had a good series in 2005 against Australia but it wasn't a Simon Jones or Freddie Flintoff kind of dazzle. The other two times he played in an Ashes he was poor. His best performance came in SA in 2004-05 when he helped England win in SA. SA team was in a rebuilding phase with AB and Amla just coming into the team but still a win in SA is rare and special (just like a win in India last year when Indian Team also just started on transition).

  • Liquefierrrr on September 12, 2013, 0:58 GMT

    As an Aussie I wish to note the following on how Hoggard is generally portrayed and viewed in our country (at least by reasonable and unbiased cricket fans): solid, reliable, tough, honest, humble, indefatigible and consistent.

    His test record is very solid, and underlying that is the fact that anyone who knows or saw him bowl would say that if the ball was moving he'd seemingly double in size.

    Even in unfavourable conditions he was, to use an overused and thus diluted term (but appropriately in this case IMO), an honest, tireless toiler who would rather break his own back for his country than leave the duties to someone else.

    I hope that he moves into commentary, as I expect he'd bring the same humble and honest qualities described above which are sorely missing in English commentary presently.

  • KunKu on September 12, 2013, 0:14 GMT

    A great swing bowler indeed. But calling him a legend in the headlines is going a bit overboard IMO. I wouldn't call Javagal Srinath (Tests 67 236 wkts at 30.49) a legend even if the remark pertains to one series of earth-shattering performance.

  • Hodra99 on September 11, 2013, 23:57 GMT

    "Ashes Legend"...really? A good honest bowler yes, but hardly a legend. Ashes Legend comments are reserved for those who dominate series after series, guys like Steve Waugh, Shane Warne, Ian Botham and Glen McGrath.

  • on September 11, 2013, 23:41 GMT

    whenever I see an unbelievable swing ....it s going to be hoggard .....man o man he used to swing the ball like if it s a plastic ball ....more swing than jimmy of course but jimmy has that in him apart from swing to be englands best bowler of all times....I mean playing with the batsmen mind .....

  • on September 11, 2013, 23:31 GMT

    High class bowler was Hoggard - to put things in a little bit of perspective he had a sub-30 average for a fair time after taking 200 Test wickets, but a disastrous final Test inflated it to closer to 31. Still, nothing to be ashamed of, and his achievements as a bowler compare favourably with the likes of James Anderson, Andy Caddick, Zaheer Khan, Brett Lee, Sarfraz Nawaz, Jacques Kallis, Chris Martin, and others. As a bowler, Hoggard was as good as any of these often more highly acclaimed players.

  • on September 11, 2013, 21:34 GMT

    missed his outswing deliveries the way he dismissed clarke and gilly in the 2005 ashes truely a legend of english cricket and i will remember him for long time..

  • 512fm on September 11, 2013, 21:15 GMT

    One of my favourite players and I still feel he was harshly dealt to being droppped and forgotten about after that one test in NZ 2008. One of the most reliable bowlers you'll come across, all the best in retirement Hoggy.

  • whoster on September 11, 2013, 21:10 GMT

    A key member of England's 2005 Ashes triumph, and a great servant to the game. Always a humble character, he'd keep giving everything whatever the match situation, and however many overs he'd bowled. He also struck me as a terrific team player and an asset in any dressing-room. 248 wickets for England showed he was a quality bowler. Best wishes, Hoggster!

  • on September 11, 2013, 20:53 GMT

    The word LEGEND is getting abused here. He is just a good player. That's about it. When people compare him to zaheer khan, they have to keep in mind that he has played most of his matches in non-responsive, sub-continental dust bowls. Good luck to Hoggard.

  • khare12 on September 11, 2013, 20:47 GMT

    hoggard was outstanding as swing bowler for england ,my first glimpse of hoggard was of a bowler bowling barred headed in chilly winters of india in hoggy's first indian tour,starngingly manny even copied his hair style in india...........

  • KingOwl on September 11, 2013, 20:10 GMT

    I thought, Hoggard what legend? Is this serious? But then, just checked his Cricinfo page and he is quite good - nearly 250 wickets, at around 30. Avg a bit on the high side for a swing bowler who bowled in helpful conditions. Still, well played Mr. Hoggard!

  • VVSR92 on September 11, 2013, 19:44 GMT

    decent bowler for england who had a brilliant outswinger. England should have stuck with him a bit longer in the international arena.Can see himcontributing well to ecb in future if he takes up a coaching role.

  • voma on September 11, 2013, 19:43 GMT

    Your right Perera32 , some of Englands bowling selections over the last few years for ODIs have been very odd . If they had persisted with hoggy , i believe he would have been a very good limited overs player .He used to open the bowling in tests , whats the difference ?

  • Cpt.Meanster on September 11, 2013, 19:35 GMT

    Don't know much about him as a player but have listened to him as a commentator surprisingly. He is a modest and humble person with a good sense of humour. Enjoy your retirement sir.

  • on September 11, 2013, 19:34 GMT

    Ashes Legend...??? Give us a spell....Ian Botham, Steve Waugh, Shane Warne, etc are Ashes legends.. Mathew Hoggard..please ...good honest trier that did reasonably well with limited ability.

  • shillingsworth on September 11, 2013, 18:48 GMT

    To those querying his legendary status, I can see what you mean - the word has become meaningless through over use. Nevertheless, anyone who was part of the team which ended England's 16 year losing streak against arguably one of the best Australian sides of all time, is still worthy of a special place in the history of the Ashes.

  • Roshan_P on September 11, 2013, 18:35 GMT

    Of course he is a legend. He only played 67 Tests and got 248 wickets, and was one of the main men in the 2005 Ashes win. Really one of the players, along with Vaughan, Hussain, Flintoff, Stewart and others, to propel England and give them the foundation to become a great team like they are now.

  • on September 11, 2013, 18:28 GMT

    Warne was an Ashes legend, Hoggard was an Ashes contributor. I hope he rings up Trescothick to thank him for all the "ball assistance" he got in the 2005 series.

  • on September 11, 2013, 18:18 GMT

    Legend? Hoggard??? Hmmm...that is some sense of humour!! Good bowler - yes. Great bowler - no! Legend? Definitely no!! One dimensional bowler who needed conditions favoring him to succeed. Hence, doesn't classify as a great or legend...

  • on September 11, 2013, 18:18 GMT

    Fantastic display of swing bowling.......hoggy.........happy retired life...

  • mredz84 on September 11, 2013, 18:16 GMT

    @Srivatsan Sridharan the article claims he was an "ashes" legend which he was. good luck for the future hoggy.

  • Rizwan16 on September 11, 2013, 18:15 GMT

    I agree with what Srivatsan Sridharan says. Hoggard was a trier who gave his best. Most remember his healthy contribution in the Ashes 2005. I think to call him 'legend' would be a little over the top. Well played, Hoggy!

  • JG2704 on September 11, 2013, 17:50 GMT

    Part of England's best pace bowling attack from the last 30+ years.

    Don't want to repeat what's already been said but I just want to add a memory. I think it must have been an away tour and there was one occasion when he was in with the Barmy Army singing Jerusalem. I think this says alot about him as a man too.

  • keiran733 on September 11, 2013, 17:44 GMT

    with all due respect to srivatsansridharan and Asadpk, it's typical of cricket lovers from the sub continent to be critical of praise for sportsman outside of Asia. I think you should read the title "Ashes Legend" in the context of 2005, and how much of an achievement it was at the time!

  • hhillbumper on September 11, 2013, 17:43 GMT

    Hoggy Hoggy Hoggy oh oh oh. Great trier,Great swing bowler and great bloke.Best of luck for the future

  • on September 11, 2013, 17:42 GMT

    Great and intelligent bowler.

  • on September 11, 2013, 17:32 GMT

    Sensational bowler..who has amazing control of high quality swing at super speed. all the best hoggard and thanks for providing great entertainment to world cricket.

  • GlobalCricketLover on September 11, 2013, 17:22 GMT

    Happy retirement..!!!! Thanks for your contributions..particularly the 2005 ashes.. I was following the matches in US through cricinfo scores... it was awesome!!

  • donnao on September 11, 2013, 17:10 GMT

    hoggard was among the all time england best bowler along with steve harmison,,,2005 ashes will remember him forever,,,best ever series i have seen.

  • Carrhill on September 11, 2013, 17:07 GMT

    Best Hoggy memory? Leaving Matthew Hayden face down in the dust. Priceless.

  • Perera32 on September 11, 2013, 16:42 GMT

    He was one of the nicest cricketers around, he was so brilliant in the 05 ashes. I really think he would've been more effective in ODI's. He should've played more ODI cricket for England instead of players like Plunket and Mahmood.

  • yorkshire-86 on September 11, 2013, 16:41 GMT

    Part of probably the best 4 man pace attack outside of the West Indies. Hoggy swinging the new ball away from the wickets, Harmison swinging the new ball away from the batsmens head, Jones swinging the old ball at the wickets, Flintoff swinging the old ball at the batsmens head. It fell apart when Harmison lost his radar, someone decided Flintoff was a new ball bowler which completely destroyed him - firstly he was useless with the new pill secondly it left him needing to bowl 25-30 overs a day which his body coudnt take, Jones was permantly injured, and Hoggy? One minor injury and one mediocre comeback game and he was discarded. Noone know why Pattinson got his place in ideal conditions at his home ground in 2008, and that selection cost the careers of Hoggard and Pattinson, leaving the latter with the moniker of a joke one test player!

  • on September 11, 2013, 16:28 GMT

    Great player . Best of luck for the future.

  • on September 11, 2013, 16:09 GMT

    With all due respect, he was a good bowler but by no means "Legend" as the article claims. Enjoy your retired life!.

  • AlanHull on September 11, 2013, 15:53 GMT

    Cheers Hoggy! Thanks for the memories.

  • Asadpk on September 11, 2013, 14:58 GMT

    good swing bowler but "Ashes legend"?

  • Dr.Vindaloo on September 11, 2013, 14:56 GMT

    In the pantheon of 'Ashes Legends' I don't think many people would expect to find Matthew Hoggard. Very good bowler but very silly headline.

  • HughL on September 11, 2013, 14:38 GMT

    Ropsh- that's a strange comment about a man with 248 test wickets. and if someone does make the most of limited talent, isn't that something to be praised for?

  • on September 11, 2013, 14:26 GMT

    I am shocked to see he played only 20 odd one days

  • on September 11, 2013, 14:07 GMT

    Ropsh, limited talents????????

    The man has better figures than Zaheer Khan, Jimmy Anderson and Andrew Flintoff.

  • jupiterlaw on September 11, 2013, 14:00 GMT

    @ B.C.G When you say you like his action, I hope that you consider his run-up also as part of it. He was definitely pleasant to watch from his start to his delivery to his follow-through.

  • RichardG on September 11, 2013, 13:50 GMT

    A hugely underrated player who worked out a way to be effective on all surfaces. His five wickets in the first innings five-fer in Johannesburg was one of the luckiest I've ever seen, but his seven wickets in the second innings remain the finest bowling performance I've seen from an England seamer in the past 25 years. A top man who was always great with the fans and who always seemed to get across that he was loving playing cricket for a living. I hope that he finds a way to remain involved in cricket somehow. His dogs will be worn out come next June if not.

  • Ropsh on September 11, 2013, 13:48 GMT

    Made the most of very limited talents. Nothing to be that sad about imo.

  • B.C.G on September 11, 2013, 13:38 GMT

    The best thing about Hoggard I liked was his action.I always copy his action while bowling.

  • MaruthuDelft on September 11, 2013, 13:37 GMT

    Marvelous Bowler. A Cricketer with Great Style. Noone in India is a match to him!!!

  • on September 11, 2013, 13:18 GMT

    One of my most favourite players! A classy swing bowler, I'll never forget the key role he played in that epic Ashes series of 2005...along with Simon Jones, Harmison, Flintoff and Giles..one of the best bowling attacks ever..

  • on September 11, 2013, 13:12 GMT

    was a great player, best of luck for the future Mathew hoggard :)

  • on September 11, 2013, 13:12 GMT

    was a great player, best of luck for the future Mathew hoggard :)

  • on September 11, 2013, 13:18 GMT

    One of my most favourite players! A classy swing bowler, I'll never forget the key role he played in that epic Ashes series of 2005...along with Simon Jones, Harmison, Flintoff and Giles..one of the best bowling attacks ever..

  • MaruthuDelft on September 11, 2013, 13:37 GMT

    Marvelous Bowler. A Cricketer with Great Style. Noone in India is a match to him!!!

  • B.C.G on September 11, 2013, 13:38 GMT

    The best thing about Hoggard I liked was his action.I always copy his action while bowling.

  • Ropsh on September 11, 2013, 13:48 GMT

    Made the most of very limited talents. Nothing to be that sad about imo.

  • RichardG on September 11, 2013, 13:50 GMT

    A hugely underrated player who worked out a way to be effective on all surfaces. His five wickets in the first innings five-fer in Johannesburg was one of the luckiest I've ever seen, but his seven wickets in the second innings remain the finest bowling performance I've seen from an England seamer in the past 25 years. A top man who was always great with the fans and who always seemed to get across that he was loving playing cricket for a living. I hope that he finds a way to remain involved in cricket somehow. His dogs will be worn out come next June if not.

  • jupiterlaw on September 11, 2013, 14:00 GMT

    @ B.C.G When you say you like his action, I hope that you consider his run-up also as part of it. He was definitely pleasant to watch from his start to his delivery to his follow-through.

  • on September 11, 2013, 14:07 GMT

    Ropsh, limited talents????????

    The man has better figures than Zaheer Khan, Jimmy Anderson and Andrew Flintoff.

  • on September 11, 2013, 14:26 GMT

    I am shocked to see he played only 20 odd one days

  • HughL on September 11, 2013, 14:38 GMT

    Ropsh- that's a strange comment about a man with 248 test wickets. and if someone does make the most of limited talent, isn't that something to be praised for?