England news October 6, 2013

Steve Harmison retires from cricket

ESPNcricinfo staff
  shares 51

Steve Harmison, the former England fast bowler who took 223 wickets in 63 Tests, has retired from cricket, bringing to an end a 17-year career with Durham. Harmison did not play a game in the club's 2013 County Championship-winning campaign and his contract subsequently expired.

"I was hoping to go out on a high in my benefit year but my body has not allowed me to, and I have not made a single first-team appearance," Harmison told the local Sunday Sun newspaper. "With my contract up at the end of the season, I have known for a while I would be calling it a day."

After making his Test debut against India at Trent Bridge in 2002, Harmison also played in 58 ODIs, picking up 76 wickets at an average of 32.64. He also played two T20s against Australia and Sri Lanka. He was an integral part of the England squad that clinched the historic 2005 Ashes 2-1, taking 17 wickets from five matches.

His retirement, following that of Matthew Hoggard last month and Andrew Flintoff three years ago, means that only Simon Jones, of England's four-man pace attack in that series, is still playing.

Harmison famously produced figures of 7 for 12 against West Indies in Jamaica in 2004 and was briefly rated as the No. 1 bowler in the Test rankings later that year, but had admitted that he found touring difficult because of homesickness and once admitted: "I don't like travelling full stop - that's just me and I'll never change."

His decline - and his aversion to touring - was summed-up by the opening ball of the 2006-07 Ashes. Harmison, clearly struggling for form and confidence, delivered a wide that went straight to second slip and set the tone for a performance, both individually and collectively, that was well below the standards set in the 2005 series. He never recovered his best form.

When the Ashes were contested again in England in 2009, Harmison played in only two of the five Tests in what proved to be his last series as an international. His final first-class appearance came at Leicester in July last year when he was on loan with Yorkshire. Having played a big part in Durham's previous two title wins - Harmison was their leading wicket-taker in 2008 and 2009 - he was awarded a benefit season with the county in 2013 but only featured in six 2nd XI games.

"There have been good and bad times but the way I look at life is you always have to learn from your mistakes," Harmison said. "If you do, sometimes they're not a bad thing.

"No one's more frustrated than me at how little I've played for Durham in the last few years, but injuries are part of being a fast bowler.

"I had plenty of highlights in an England career that spanned nine years, during which time I became the world's top-ranked Test bowler."

While Harmison may have faded, taking some of the gloss off his career, there is no doubt that, at his best in the period between 2003-2005, he was one of the most formidable fast bowlers ever produced by England and a key part of the side's resurgence in those years.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY jackiethepen on | October 6, 2013, 11:51 GMT

    What a tremendous servant to Durham too. He was the leading bowler in their 2008 and 2009 Championship seasons. When discarded by England he stepped up for Durham under the support of coach Geoff Cook who reignited Harmison's self-belief. The home crowd played their part. It was a privilege to watch the big man at the Riverside. Not sure he declined that much in 2006 - you only have to read Langer's report on facing him to get a sense of the hostility. In the Ashes Series which ended badly for England with 5-0 whitewash England suffered a lot of injuries and illness among their first choice XI. It is not often recalled that Harmison was returning from injury and out of practice at the start of the Ashes.

  • POSTED BY Front-Foot-Lunge on | October 6, 2013, 10:12 GMT

    Great guy, fearsome speedster in his time. His performance in 2005 stands the test of time. And Ricky Ponting's cheek has the scar that bears witness to that. Who could forget the Aussie captain's face pouring with blood at that Lord's test in 2005? Those who saw him bowl in his prime can only be full of accolades for him. Great innings Harmy, we'll never forget you.

  • POSTED BY on | October 6, 2013, 9:59 GMT

    Legit fast, just not always legit accurate but a force to be beckoned with for an English bowler. A handy batsman sometimes, which is always a good thing. You did help with the 2005 Ashes and that'll never be forgotten, Steve. I admire your ability and that's a rare trait. I wish you the best. RD.

  • POSTED BY AKS286 on | October 10, 2013, 12:39 GMT

    Steve Harmission reminds us the Goliath bowlers whose only presence brings fear Same like West Indian era. Great work Steavie all the best!

  • POSTED BY on | October 10, 2013, 2:00 GMT

    Front Foot Lounge,I remembered the Ricky Ponting incident and undoubtedly Steve Harmison has been a true competitor.I don't know if you have any recollection of this,but WI Shivnarine Chanderpaul hit him for 26 runs in an over during a One Day International played at Providence in Guyana.In that over Chanderpaul hit 5 fours and a six.It was a classy display of batting supremacy. But cricket is an unpredictable game and all kind of things happen.I wish him well in the future.

  • POSTED BY TenDonebyaShooter on | October 9, 2013, 18:56 GMT

    @Shan156: You are right about Harmison's record against India. It is in fact a curious record of England teams of his period that in spite of their much vaunted success elsewhere, they tended to struggle against Asian teams. Michael Vaughan - the captain who recorded the most test victories of any England captain, and undoubtedly the captain who got the best out of Harmison - never led England to a single test victory over India, Pakistan, or Sri Lanka, in eleven tests (drawn 7, lost 4). In contrast, even Flintoff, whose captaincy of England seemed so ill-fated, led them to a test victory in India - in a test moreover where England were without Harmison, Vaughan, Cook, or Trescothick, and where their match-winners including the unlikely combination of Owais Shah and Shaun Udal.

  • POSTED BY Shan156 on | October 8, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    @electric_loco_WAP4, "and a few notable tests/series winning showings v teams like Ind and SA "

    Harmy played 4 tests against India - 1 in England and 3 in India. England did not win any of them. They drew 2 and lost 2.

  • POSTED BY CricketingStargazer on | October 8, 2013, 13:34 GMT

    Steve Harmison was, by all accounts, a genuinely lovely bloke. I always regret that the one occasion that I was at Chester-Le-Street to watch a county match he was injured and out of the side. On early season pitches he was a genuinely fearsome prospect, as reflected in his returns year after year. He went out in a sadly low-key way, playing a couple of T20s in early May for Durhams 2nds v Scotland A and never played again.

    A large part of his problem was that he was a genuinely sensitive person who needed careful handling and needed to feel important to the team. Over his last winter playing for England he was in and out of the side 17(!!) times, which was no way to motivate him. Part of the problem was that he had a period of 9 months when his form was truly great and that saddled him with fans having unrealistic expectations and, thus, being frequently disappointed. There were few series between 2003 and 2009 where he did not put in at least one match-turning/winning performance.

  • POSTED BY R_U_4_REAL_NICK on | October 7, 2013, 18:37 GMT

    2005 Ashes series, and in particular THAT over against Clarke that FFL has so neatly and graphically expressed, probably my most memorable experience of Harmy - even more-so than his Caribbean-Calypso stuff. I always wondered how England would have done had Harmy stayed in form and Simon Jones not been horribly injured...

    Ashes series in Aus. where he opened the series with THAT wide was always telling that something just wasn't right, at least not all the time anyway. Best of luck Harmy - I reckon your great nature would serve well in a coaching role for newby quicks...

  • POSTED BY Whatsgoinoffoutthere on | October 7, 2013, 17:37 GMT

    Only Simon Jones left playing from the England attack of 2005. You wouldn't have thought that likely, would you?

  • POSTED BY jackiethepen on | October 6, 2013, 11:51 GMT

    What a tremendous servant to Durham too. He was the leading bowler in their 2008 and 2009 Championship seasons. When discarded by England he stepped up for Durham under the support of coach Geoff Cook who reignited Harmison's self-belief. The home crowd played their part. It was a privilege to watch the big man at the Riverside. Not sure he declined that much in 2006 - you only have to read Langer's report on facing him to get a sense of the hostility. In the Ashes Series which ended badly for England with 5-0 whitewash England suffered a lot of injuries and illness among their first choice XI. It is not often recalled that Harmison was returning from injury and out of practice at the start of the Ashes.

  • POSTED BY Front-Foot-Lunge on | October 6, 2013, 10:12 GMT

    Great guy, fearsome speedster in his time. His performance in 2005 stands the test of time. And Ricky Ponting's cheek has the scar that bears witness to that. Who could forget the Aussie captain's face pouring with blood at that Lord's test in 2005? Those who saw him bowl in his prime can only be full of accolades for him. Great innings Harmy, we'll never forget you.

  • POSTED BY on | October 6, 2013, 9:59 GMT

    Legit fast, just not always legit accurate but a force to be beckoned with for an English bowler. A handy batsman sometimes, which is always a good thing. You did help with the 2005 Ashes and that'll never be forgotten, Steve. I admire your ability and that's a rare trait. I wish you the best. RD.

  • POSTED BY AKS286 on | October 10, 2013, 12:39 GMT

    Steve Harmission reminds us the Goliath bowlers whose only presence brings fear Same like West Indian era. Great work Steavie all the best!

  • POSTED BY on | October 10, 2013, 2:00 GMT

    Front Foot Lounge,I remembered the Ricky Ponting incident and undoubtedly Steve Harmison has been a true competitor.I don't know if you have any recollection of this,but WI Shivnarine Chanderpaul hit him for 26 runs in an over during a One Day International played at Providence in Guyana.In that over Chanderpaul hit 5 fours and a six.It was a classy display of batting supremacy. But cricket is an unpredictable game and all kind of things happen.I wish him well in the future.

  • POSTED BY TenDonebyaShooter on | October 9, 2013, 18:56 GMT

    @Shan156: You are right about Harmison's record against India. It is in fact a curious record of England teams of his period that in spite of their much vaunted success elsewhere, they tended to struggle against Asian teams. Michael Vaughan - the captain who recorded the most test victories of any England captain, and undoubtedly the captain who got the best out of Harmison - never led England to a single test victory over India, Pakistan, or Sri Lanka, in eleven tests (drawn 7, lost 4). In contrast, even Flintoff, whose captaincy of England seemed so ill-fated, led them to a test victory in India - in a test moreover where England were without Harmison, Vaughan, Cook, or Trescothick, and where their match-winners including the unlikely combination of Owais Shah and Shaun Udal.

  • POSTED BY Shan156 on | October 8, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    @electric_loco_WAP4, "and a few notable tests/series winning showings v teams like Ind and SA "

    Harmy played 4 tests against India - 1 in England and 3 in India. England did not win any of them. They drew 2 and lost 2.

  • POSTED BY CricketingStargazer on | October 8, 2013, 13:34 GMT

    Steve Harmison was, by all accounts, a genuinely lovely bloke. I always regret that the one occasion that I was at Chester-Le-Street to watch a county match he was injured and out of the side. On early season pitches he was a genuinely fearsome prospect, as reflected in his returns year after year. He went out in a sadly low-key way, playing a couple of T20s in early May for Durhams 2nds v Scotland A and never played again.

    A large part of his problem was that he was a genuinely sensitive person who needed careful handling and needed to feel important to the team. Over his last winter playing for England he was in and out of the side 17(!!) times, which was no way to motivate him. Part of the problem was that he had a period of 9 months when his form was truly great and that saddled him with fans having unrealistic expectations and, thus, being frequently disappointed. There were few series between 2003 and 2009 where he did not put in at least one match-turning/winning performance.

  • POSTED BY R_U_4_REAL_NICK on | October 7, 2013, 18:37 GMT

    2005 Ashes series, and in particular THAT over against Clarke that FFL has so neatly and graphically expressed, probably my most memorable experience of Harmy - even more-so than his Caribbean-Calypso stuff. I always wondered how England would have done had Harmy stayed in form and Simon Jones not been horribly injured...

    Ashes series in Aus. where he opened the series with THAT wide was always telling that something just wasn't right, at least not all the time anyway. Best of luck Harmy - I reckon your great nature would serve well in a coaching role for newby quicks...

  • POSTED BY Whatsgoinoffoutthere on | October 7, 2013, 17:37 GMT

    Only Simon Jones left playing from the England attack of 2005. You wouldn't have thought that likely, would you?

  • POSTED BY HumungousFungus on | October 7, 2013, 16:25 GMT

    At his absolute best, he was a genuinely unsettling prospect for even the best batsman, as he offered a terrifying combination of sheer speed, steepling bounce, and away swing. Even when not at his best, when the radar was malfunctioning, it could often be scarier, because the subsequent lack of control, and complete variety in line and length were never, ever compromised by a reduction in speed, and the risk to life and limb was considerable. I think it fair to say that even before he played international cricket, he was at or near the top of the list of bowlers most county batsmen least enjoyed facing. My favourite memory of him is not an obvious one: a brilliant 4-33 against SA on a super flat Oval pitch in 2003 where he ripped out Kirsten and Kallis, who were both well set, and in tandem with Martin Bicknell took England to a win that had looked a long way away when SA were 362/4 at the end of day 1. A genuinely nice bloke, to whom I wish a happy and peaceful retirement.

  • POSTED BY 122notoutWestByfleet1996 on | October 7, 2013, 14:30 GMT

    @zoot364 - I have always thought that this ball got completely overshadowed by the frenzied happenings before and after in the Edgbaston test, especially the morning session on day 4 when Aus got so close to England. It really was a magnificent slower ball, perfect line and length, no discernible change of pace in delivery action, and from my recollection, Harmison was not known for his slower ball. Not only that but it seamed away like a big leg cutter, beating Clarke's push towards mid on.

    In the context of the game, it was a huge moment. Clarke was reasonably well set and had he returned the next morning accompanied by Warne, Australia may well have won.

    I know this does not make him a great bowler, but it was certainly a moment in time that is imprinted on my memory and will be forever, and for that reason, Harmison will always evoke fond memories for me.

  • POSTED BY electric_loco_WAP4 on | October 7, 2013, 13:17 GMT

    Oh ,my fave. memories of Harmy . Def few from Ashes'05 where apart from Lee ,was the 2nd fastest bowler in series where fast bowlers from both sides made compelling viewing .But my fav. has to be the massive -must been 150 mtrs! - 6 Brett Lee hit of a Harmy ball @ 90 odd mph that sailed well over Leeds stadium . Was unbelievable -fast man vs fast ,both giving their all and guess who 1 again ? -Brett Lee ! A 'special' mention to 'ball of the century' - this century,not the last ! Can say 2nd 1 after the 1 by Warnie. It set the famous 07'-08' Ashes vs the mighty Aussies on the way in an unforgettable fashion.

  • POSTED BY electric_loco_WAP4 on | October 7, 2013, 12:43 GMT

    Was 1 of rarities of Eng in recent times -genuine quick capable of 95 mph. Though he lacked -apart from pace,bounce on some pitches due to height -the skill,class or control of better Eng bowlers like Caddick and Gough and could let team down when things didn't go well .Had his moments as well as his bowling in WI and a few notable tests/series winning showings v teams like Ind and SA .He was taken apart by the best team in the world -the mighty Aussies - though,with their bats like Ponting ,for eg. taking a liking for his kind of bowling esp. when he lost his radar,using his pace and bounce to play the cut/pull to great effect.Excuse him for it -better bowlers had worse v Aussies,but 1 series makes up for all -1 and only Ashes'05.Small but effective part in 4 man Eng attack that felled Aus and set up great series is 1 of his best.Also was only Eng's counter to world's fastest -Lee in great Aus attack that Ashes.Not in class of Lee ,Kasper,Pollock,Jason,Vaas ,Mcgrath ,good though.

  • POSTED BY Yevghenny on | October 7, 2013, 12:41 GMT

    Harmison was very unfortunate to be in the England side at a time where coaches were obsessed with using computer models to change the actions of fast bowlers that destroyed Plunkett and very nearly ended Anderson's career. Thank god Alan Donald came in and put that right

  • POSTED BY on | October 7, 2013, 10:04 GMT

    He was very tall and I once travelled with him in a lift along with Freddie. Both of them brushed the ceiling, such tall northern lads. As a bowler had a jerky unrhythmic action but could generate disconcerting lift and bounce when in rhythm. He would have lasted longer had the management rested him and not run him to the ground. Both he and Freddie suffered as a result. His wicket tally is 226 in 63 tests.

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | October 7, 2013, 9:46 GMT

    @Rajiv Radhakrishnanon (October 7, 2013, 7:52 GMT) I'm sure that when Thorpe and Smith retired , there were similar articles on those players and probably similar comments from folk saying that they weren't that good , blah blah blah. Steve Harmison has only just announced his retirement and I don't think it was the 7 for vs WI alone which got him (albeit briefly) to the top of the test rankings.

  • POSTED BY zoot364 on | October 7, 2013, 8:56 GMT

    For me, that slower ball to dismiss Clarke in 2005 was the best ball I've seen delivered by an English Test player. Enjoy your retirement Steve.

  • POSTED BY Biggus on | October 7, 2013, 8:01 GMT

    @gsingh7:-Let's be real here, Kapil Dev cannot be considered in the same league as Marshall or Hadlee, who were truly great quicks.

  • POSTED BY on | October 7, 2013, 7:52 GMT

    He got 7-12 v WI and lived off that for the rest of his career. Not convinced. Just like Vaughan who had an amazing 6 months in 2002, and achieved little else, or Flintoff who had ONE good series. Yet the like of Robin Smith and Thorpe who were consistently very good are not remembered.

  • POSTED BY Valavan on | October 7, 2013, 7:14 GMT

    @clarke501,Shan. Its obvious that gsingh have the tendency to comment without any valid point or argument. His knowledge in cricket is always understandable with his baseless comments. Leave him aside and spend your time wisely instead answering to him. cricinfo please publish.

  • POSTED BY shillingsworth on | October 6, 2013, 23:10 GMT

    @maximum6 - Very true. To me it's just lazy thinking. Ironically Pattinson opened up the last series with a huge wide. That obviously meant it was going to be 3-0!

  • POSTED BY Fifthman on | October 6, 2013, 21:36 GMT

    I'll remember Harmison for his wonderful slower ball that completely flummoxed Michael Clarke just before stumps on the 4th day of the 2005 Edgbaston test and clean bowled him. Had Australia still had Clarke on the pitch at the start of the 5th day, that famous result could have been very different. It was also Harmison that got the last Aussie wicket, that of Kasprowicz, with a brutish lifter - a Harmy speciality. And it's also worth mentioning that Harmy roughed up Phil Hughes so effectively during an England A vs. Aus match in 2009 that he lost the confidence that he never since has recovered. Well done Harmy - on your day you were a bowler that no batsmen on the planet wanted to face. Put your feet up and enjoy a well-earned retirement.

  • POSTED BY 2.14istherunrate on | October 6, 2013, 21:08 GMT

    I do have to wonder WHY everyone thought the wide which Harmy bowled in Brisbane in 2006 was an indicator of where the Ashes were headed? It was the same in 94/5 when Slater drove McCague? to the boundary. Why have we been so tuned into this connection? Mercifully Strauss broke the hoodoo on the last tour by slapping the ball to Gully(first or second delivery and then overseeing the great escape with 110 which he made with Cook, and then captained us to the massacre of Australia by miles. What exactly though are we tuning into ? It was just a bad ball. Nobody mentions it in home series. Weird.

  • POSTED BY AckaBilk on | October 6, 2013, 20:56 GMT

    I'll never forget watching him rip Derbyshire to shreds in 1999 in a game Durham won in 2 days. As so often with Harmy, he may not have taken many wickets, but the wild swipes that earned his colleagues bowling from the other end cheap wickets were as a direct result of batsmen not wanting to hang around long enough to face 'Grievous Bodily Harmison'

  • POSTED BY JG2704 on | October 6, 2013, 18:39 GMT

    Am I right in thinking he was the last and only English bowler to be ranked @1 in the ICC rankings?

    As already said ,it's frustrating that his peak period was so short but on his day he was immense. And he was part of the best performing English 11 for the last 30 years or more Has always come across as a decent guy too.

  • POSTED BY TenDonebyaShooter on | October 6, 2013, 18:22 GMT

    Harmison had plenty of critics in his time, not least among England-based pundits and supporters, who tended to depict him as a total underachiever (I recall one article about him about five years ago entitled "What a waste"). Yet its odd that his record of two series wins of the four Ashes series he played in reads so much better than that of many players of a slightly earlier generation much more highly praised in that constituency. For instance; Gough, Atherton, Stewart, Thorpe and Robin Smith added together never once appeared on the winning side in an Ashes series. That doesn't sound like underachievement to me. Put your feet up, Steve, and enjoy retirement.

  • POSTED BY shillingsworth on | October 6, 2013, 18:09 GMT

    @gsingh7 - Strangely enough the 'real test' of any English bowler, fast, medium pace or slow, is how they perform in the country where they play half their international matches, which would be England, not the subcontinent. Vaas was hopeless in England and averaged 40 plus in India, Australia and South Africa. How does he rank above Harmison?

  • POSTED BY on | October 6, 2013, 17:29 GMT

    His 7-12 will go down in history, legendary stuff.

  • POSTED BY RodStark on | October 6, 2013, 16:49 GMT

    Who would have thought that out of England's four man pace attack for the 2005 Ashes, Simon Jones would be the only one still playing eight years later!

  • POSTED BY george204 on | October 6, 2013, 15:43 GMT

    You've ommitted what I think are the key parts of his statement, so I reproduce them here, because to me they speak volumes about a fine cricketer & a good man: "But I did not want to take the shine off such a magnificent campaign for Durham by announcing it before the end." "I may not have been able to contribute in the way I wished, but I have at least got what I most wanted out of the 2013 season - the County Championship trophy back in the cabinet at Chester-le-Street. So now, with the club's end-of-season awards night out of the way, I can make my decision public." "I had plenty of highlights in an England career that spanned nine years, during which time I became the world's top-ranked Test bowler. But my thoughts always come back to Durham. The picture which gives me the most pleasure was of me walking off the field at Canterbury on the day we won Durham's first Championship. One hand, with its wrist broken, is clutching a stump, the other is around my brother Ben."

  • POSTED BY Tom_Bowler on | October 6, 2013, 15:42 GMT

    Had all the talent but no ticker.

  • POSTED BY Shan156 on | October 6, 2013, 15:31 GMT

    @gsingh7, none of your so-called great spinners have even a decent record in England which is a real test for spinners. Did you know that Kumble averaged 30+ in all countries except India, Bangladesh, and Zimbabwe? The less said about Harbhajan and Indian seamers like Ishant the better.

    Harmi was an awesome bowler on his day. He had all the attributes of a great fast bowler but used them only on rare occasions. Other than the 2003-2004 WI series, he was not consistent. I wish to forget the 2004-2005 SA series that was a nadir for him personally although Eng. won and of course the 2006-2007 Ashes and the first ball to slip. Anyway, Harmi had his moments and I am glad that his last test resulted in a win for Eng. against the old enemy and he had a part to play in that with a few key wickets. Enjoy your retirement Harmi.

  • POSTED BY on | October 6, 2013, 15:08 GMT

    I always thought he was capable of more but just didn't want it enough. Yeah I get he hated touring but suck it up, man! If 2005 was the high point, the combo of a hubristic flintoff and a terribly out of form harmy in Australia, combined with Fletcher going against his gut and making freddy captain, was the low point.

    Best delivery: slower ball to Michael Clarke, 2nd Test at Edgbaston, 4th day, Ashes 2005.

  • POSTED BY liz1558 on | October 6, 2013, 15:00 GMT

    All of England's fast bowlers over the past ten years have produced some great performances, but Harmy looked like the only one capable of being truly great. And he came so close! It was a big disappointment that he couldn't maintain the form that made him the best in the world for more than just a year. Like Michael Vaughan who flattered to decieve, we were left with an unfulfilled talent and a sense of longing about what might have been. A lament.

  • POSTED BY 2.14istherunrate on | October 6, 2013, 14:55 GMT

    One of the great enigmas of the last decade he varied from total devastation to harmless rubbish a bit like Devon Malcom though the management had a bit more faith in him. I do not think he was mentally strong enough nor willing enough to overcome his home sickness-a good personal coach/therapist might have been of use. It is best then to remember him for that withering power and terror he bought to the game and point out that pitches of the 'corporate' nature so beloved of Beefy etc are as much to blame as anything. Obviously the West Indies were doing him no favours in 2009 on his return there, and elsewhere the weather and groundsmen militated against decent surfaces being prepared. It is a pity as the game loses one of its spectacles on these hapless puddings. He is Durham through and through and I think the success there meant as much to him as England's. Maybe in retirement he should involve himself with pitches and how to make them faster!

  • POSTED BY cloudmess on | October 6, 2013, 14:24 GMT

    It is a pity he didn't maintain his form for longer, but he can still be proud of his career - at his best, he was briefly the most feared fast bowler in the world. He roughed the Aussies up in 2005 - then still a great side - and constantly took vital wickets. He also played a major part in 2 Durham title wins in 2008 and 9. So well done and thanks, Steve Harmison.

  • POSTED BY Roshan_P on | October 6, 2013, 14:01 GMT

    Great bowler, and I have a fond recollection of him hitting a yorker for four in a Test. He was great against the West Indies and Australia. Well done, Harmy.

  • POSTED BY gsingh7 on | October 6, 2013, 13:38 GMT

    well played harmison. although not in league of marshal ,kapil,vaas, hadlee but still did enough to play tests for england. could have done better but i guess he did best he can and had nothing else to show for. enjoy ur retirement , u did what u cud for country although england were never a world beater while he played. underperformed on subcontinent duties which is real test of fast bowlers on flat tracks.

  • POSTED BY voma on | October 6, 2013, 13:01 GMT

    Kind of felt he never fulfilled his potential really , i mean honestly . He could of been the best England fast bowler ! , of all time . That ball that got Micheal Clarke in 2005 being my personal favourite .

  • POSTED BY shillingsworth on | October 6, 2013, 12:48 GMT

    I saw his last test in 2009. It looked as if Australia would take the match into a final day until Harmison came back. He took 3 quick wickets and all but finished the match with a hat trick. Quite a few happy people got to see the Ashes regained that day. Thanks Steve.

  • POSTED BY espncricinfomobile on | October 6, 2013, 11:58 GMT

    I saw him bowling,very straight action and follow through and variety in his bowling,well done Steve.

  • POSTED BY on | October 6, 2013, 11:57 GMT

    A fearsome contender. You will be missed.

  • POSTED BY Jaffa79 on | October 6, 2013, 11:52 GMT

    I think it is a massive shame that Harmison wasn't able to maintain his form of 2004 for longer; I think he trained with Newcastle Utd that winter before the W.Indies trip and got himself really fit and the results were devastating. I may be wrong but he never really looked that fit again. During that 04-05 period he was a seriously nasty bowler to face and it is a shame that he couldn't keep it going for longer. When he was good he was very good and when he was bad he was dreadful.

  • POSTED BY 1st_april on | October 6, 2013, 11:50 GMT

    Temerity to intimidate Australia in their heydays......Thank you Steve Harmison

  • POSTED BY TestsareBest on | October 6, 2013, 11:33 GMT

    Steve Harmison was a force of nature, as good as anyone on his day. He was the bowler the Aussies feared most and gave that 2005 Ashes attack a nasty edge. 223 wickets in 63 Tests is a record of which he can be proud but it doesn't tell the full story of how impressive he was to watch in real life. Thanks for great memories and good luck.

  • POSTED BY on | October 6, 2013, 11:33 GMT

    A good bowler who blew hot and cold. I think that experience in 2006/7 basically did for him and he never recovered. Best of luck to him.

  • POSTED BY AKS286 on | October 6, 2013, 10:58 GMT

    Good bowler and person, He is a great genuine clear action fast bowler of earlier era. All the best fella for your life. I still remember the wicket of Kasprowitz in the '05 Ashes when only 2 runs to win. Durhum will miss you.

  • POSTED BY jonnybtestmatch on | October 6, 2013, 10:21 GMT

    When he was hot there was none better and when he was cold there was no worse. Harmy will always be remembered fondly from the English fans and I wish him well in retirement.

  • POSTED BY android_user on | October 6, 2013, 9:51 GMT

    Bye steve have agreat retired life

  • POSTED BY skilebow on | October 6, 2013, 9:33 GMT

    Enjoy your retirement. Will never forget the slower ball to Clarke in 2005. IMHO, the ball that won the ahses

  • POSTED BY skilebow on | October 6, 2013, 9:33 GMT

    Enjoy your retirement. Will never forget the slower ball to Clarke in 2005. IMHO, the ball that won the ahses

  • POSTED BY android_user on | October 6, 2013, 9:51 GMT

    Bye steve have agreat retired life

  • POSTED BY jonnybtestmatch on | October 6, 2013, 10:21 GMT

    When he was hot there was none better and when he was cold there was no worse. Harmy will always be remembered fondly from the English fans and I wish him well in retirement.

  • POSTED BY AKS286 on | October 6, 2013, 10:58 GMT

    Good bowler and person, He is a great genuine clear action fast bowler of earlier era. All the best fella for your life. I still remember the wicket of Kasprowitz in the '05 Ashes when only 2 runs to win. Durhum will miss you.

  • POSTED BY on | October 6, 2013, 11:33 GMT

    A good bowler who blew hot and cold. I think that experience in 2006/7 basically did for him and he never recovered. Best of luck to him.

  • POSTED BY TestsareBest on | October 6, 2013, 11:33 GMT

    Steve Harmison was a force of nature, as good as anyone on his day. He was the bowler the Aussies feared most and gave that 2005 Ashes attack a nasty edge. 223 wickets in 63 Tests is a record of which he can be proud but it doesn't tell the full story of how impressive he was to watch in real life. Thanks for great memories and good luck.

  • POSTED BY 1st_april on | October 6, 2013, 11:50 GMT

    Temerity to intimidate Australia in their heydays......Thank you Steve Harmison

  • POSTED BY Jaffa79 on | October 6, 2013, 11:52 GMT

    I think it is a massive shame that Harmison wasn't able to maintain his form of 2004 for longer; I think he trained with Newcastle Utd that winter before the W.Indies trip and got himself really fit and the results were devastating. I may be wrong but he never really looked that fit again. During that 04-05 period he was a seriously nasty bowler to face and it is a shame that he couldn't keep it going for longer. When he was good he was very good and when he was bad he was dreadful.

  • POSTED BY on | October 6, 2013, 11:57 GMT

    A fearsome contender. You will be missed.

  • POSTED BY espncricinfomobile on | October 6, 2013, 11:58 GMT

    I saw him bowling,very straight action and follow through and variety in his bowling,well done Steve.