Emerging Players Tournament, Brisbane, 5th day

New Zealand demolish Australia by 138 runs

Cricinfo staff

August 14, 2010

Text size: A | A

New Zealand Emerging Players 296 for 4 (Brownlie 116*, How 60, Diamanti 41*) beat Australian Institute of Sport 158 (Maddison 71, Beard 5-31, Scott 4-40) by 138 runs
Scorecard

Dean Brownlie's majestic unbeaten hundred coupled with some aggressive middle-order batting saw New Zealand Emerging Players thrash Australian Institute of Sport by 138 runs.

Australia won the toss and chose to field. When Mitchell Starc bowled Tim McIntosh for one, it looked like the right decision. But Brownlie and How put on 146 for the second wicket and then the fun really began. Colin de Grandhomme smashed 31 off 10 balls, which seemed to inspire Brendon Diamanti, who promptly topped him with 41 off 12, including five sixes. Diamanti's fifth wicket partnership with Brownlie saw 44 savaged off just two and-a-half overs. The fireworks left Shanan Stewart's 38 off 21 balls looking very pedestrian in comparison.

Opener Nic Maddison tried to give Australia a platform to chase the game, making 71 off 64 balls, but only one other batsman managed more than 20. Bradley Scott knocked over the top order, taking 4 for 40, before Nick Beard finished the job with a fine five-wicket haul.

South Africa Emerging Players 239 (Jacobs 79, Ingram 71, Chawla 5-57) beat India Emerging Players 179 (Chawla 44, Dhawan 42, Alexander 2-25) by 60 runs
Scorecard

A century partnership between Davey Jacobs and Colin Ingram carried South Africa Emerging Players to a comfortable 60-run victory over India Emerging players.

South Africa won the toss and chose to bat. Jacobs and Ingram put on 104 after two early wickets had fallen, with Jacobs making 79 and Ingram 71, as South Africa were bowled out for 239. Piyush Chawla, while proving somewhat expensive, did most of the damage, taking 5 for 57 off 12 overs. In reply, India lost wickets at regular intervals and despite Chawla throwing his bat around at the end - he made 44 of 38 balls - were never really in the game.

After four days of Twenty20 competition, which on ended on Thursday with Australia beating India in the final, the tournament has shifted formats to the 40-over game.

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

TopTop
Email Feedback Print
Share
E-mail
Feedback
Print
ESPNcricinfo staffClose
News | Features Last 3 days
News | Features Last 3 days