England v New Zealand, World T20 2016, Semi-final, Delhi March 30, 2016

England 'buzzing' after special performance

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You dream of these things. Your bowlers pull back a side from 89 for 1 in 10 overs to keep them down to 153, and your opener hits four fours in the first over. He goes on to score 78 off 44 balls, and by the time he gets out you are left needing 44 runs at under a run a ball. The nerves of chasing in a big game are knocked straight out of the window. Jason Roy did just that with his uncluttered approach on a pitch he could trust. New Zealand had pulled back sides earlier in the tournament, but they couldn't recover from the Roy assault.

This was Roy's first Twenty20 international fifty, but he brings with him an impressive body of work, a career strike rate of 141.46 in all Twenty20 cricket, including two centuries. England have similarly flown under the radar a bit, and Roy was pretty pleased the detractors had been proven wrong. "We're that sort of a side," Roy said. "We've had a lot of negative feedback from a few people and to be in a World cup final now has hopefully got a few people on our side. There's been a huge amount of support all tournament from back home and around the world so thanks to all those people."

This comeback in the tournament is all the sweeter after the way they had been stream-rolled by a Chris Gayle century in their first match. "It's pretty cool," Roy said. "After the first game it was pretty far away. It's something that we're really buzzing for. It's going to be an incredible experience, and we can't wait."

Chris Jordan and Ben Stokes set up the win with an amazing spell of yorkers and variations at the end of New Zealand's innings, going for just 20 in the last four. It was a continuation from their impressive effort against Sri Lanka when a late Angelo Mathews assault had put them under pressure. "The momentum that we carried over from the end of their innings to ours was outstanding," Roy said. "They've grown in confidence from the Sri Lanka performance. It was just perfect."

Then Roy came out blazing. He said it was the plan to try to knock the stuffing out of New Zealand's defence. "You kind of want to give yourself a chance," Roy said. "But when you get off to a good start like that you kind of just want to keep going, and I did. I got a bit of luck and got a few boundaries, hit a few gaps. The next minute I was there and next minute I was out. Yeah it was an idea to go out there and smash every ball to be honest. Sometimes you go out there and struggle your first 10 balls and don't hit a boundary.

"That's pretty special for me, to get this group of boys to a final. Obviously it wasn't just me - the bowlers were outstanding towards the end, their skill sets were amazing. I'm just hugely proud to be involved."

Coming into the tournament, England captain Eoin Morgan spoke of how they needed to "embrace the naiveté". Roy said the philosophy didn't change for a big game. "All the boys today were extremely chilled out," he said. "We go out and do what we practice: if it works it works, it doesn't it doesn't. We'll have bad days and good days but it's gone our way the last few days."

There is going to be one more big day after what Roy termed a day "as good as it probably gets". It will be a totally new set of conditions for England, and could be against either West Indies, who beat them earlier, or the pre-tournament favourites India. It is a day England are totally "buzzed for". Roy summed up what's in store: "We're getting better with every game. It's just another game of cricket. It just happens to be at Eden Gardens in the World Cup final in front of 100,000 people. It's going to be an incredible experience but we're going to go out there and play our natural way and play the brand of cricket we've played for the last year or so."

Sidharth Monga is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • thebatsmansHoldingthebowlersWilley on April 1, 2016, 8:18 GMT

    @ JMCILHINNEY - Good point. Strauss is the man pulling the strings, and he has definitely got things moving in the right direction, particularly in the short formats. Farbrace made some canny decisions though. Moving Stokes to 6 and Ali to 8 in the Test XI for example. Some of Bayliss' decisions have not been so successful - opening with Ali and then with Hales both predictably failed. Then Bayliss publicly undermined Compton saying he would ideally like a more dynamic no.3. We know that ODI cricket is Trevor's domain, but I wasn't overly impressed with his management of the Test side over the winter

  • jmcilhinney on April 1, 2016, 5:25 GMT

    @landl47 on March 31, 2016, 21:42 GMT

    "Farbrace chose not to apply for the England job, but as far as I can see almost everything that England has achieved has been down to him. Every player in the side which won the semi-final was there before Bayliss arrived in England and the series against NZ which brought in the change in attitude was when Farbrace was interim coach."

    I don't doubt that Bayliss is doing a good job and I also don't doubt that Farbrace deserves a lot of credit too. That said, Farbrace didn't select those players for the NZ series. In all this talk of who deserves the credit, I think that Andrew Strauss is the forgotten man. It seems to me that his appointment changed the approach at the management level and that led to better selection and the coaches and players having the confidence to express their talent like never before. Bayliss, Farbrace, Morgan and the other players deserve credit but Strauss has brought the ECB into the 21st century.

  • landl47 on March 31, 2016, 21:42 GMT

    Izziddle says: If Farbrace was that good why is he the assistant coach? I think many of us are wondering that. Farbrace chose not to apply for the England job, but as far as I can see almost everything that England has achieved has been down to him. Every player in the side which won the semi-final was there before Bayliss arrived in England and the series against NZ which brought in the change in attitude was when Farbrace was interim coach.

    I understand Bayliss and Farbrace enjoy working together, but to my mind the person who is responsible for the success England has had with its new approach is Farbrace. I hope he will become England coach at some point in the future.

  • jmcilhinney on March 31, 2016, 13:28 GMT

    @Diaz54 on March 31, 2016, 1:46 GMT

    "They should have been beaten by Pak but for their poor batting and fielding."

    You do realise how ridiculous that statement is, right? Batting and fielding are two-thirds of cricket. How can you deserve to win a game of cricket if you bat and field worse than your opposition? You're basically saying that Pakistan would have beaten NZ if they weren't worse at playing cricket.

  • jmcilhinney on March 31, 2016, 13:22 GMT

    @DEEsAustralianLegands on March 30, 2016, 22:08 GMT; I get the feeling that your comment was rather tongue-in-cheek but, speaking seriously, I think that the appointment of Andrew Strauss may have been more important. He seems to have brought some sense to the England management and things have flowed on from their. Not that he could have done it all himself of course, but it's also worth noting that England's turnaround got underway at home against NZ. In that ODI series they scored 400+ for the first time and chased down 350+. That was playing under Paul Farbrace, before Trevor Bayliss had even arrived in England so, while Bayliss may have done a good job, he has more continued what had already been put in place than instigated it. Maybe England would be here without him anyway but, regardless, they're here and I have no complaints.

  • markatnotts on March 31, 2016, 11:50 GMT

    @IZZIDOLE: "Thebatsmanholdingthebowlerswilley: Wasn't Paul Farbrace the England cricket coach earlier too and lost his job and was brought back only just before the English cricket season when he was Sri Lanka coach? If Farbrace was that good why is he the assistant coach?" Completely untrue, he had never been England coach before his stint that started before Bayliss arrived and had an immediate impact. To this day I am not even that sure what Bayliss adds but he seems to be a calm figurehead. What on earth is wrong with clubs hiring the likes of Jason Gillespie. If anything this could help Australia as he will have had rich experience of coaching a good first division side in England before (I predict) getting the Australian job somewhere down the line. Lots of other countries have also used foreign coaches, but I guess it doesn't suite your agenda to consider that.

  • Eadezee on March 31, 2016, 11:45 GMT

    @IZZIDOLE In the past twelve months England have won back The Ashes (having stuffed the Aussies in 3 of the first 4 Tests), beaten South Africa in their own back yard and have now reached the World T20 Final in India. As an England fan I'm looking forward to the next few years with a team that can perform home & away in a style that entertains and without the spoilt child traits that makes some cricket teams so unpopular..........

  •   Danial Ali Shah on March 31, 2016, 11:19 GMT

    What amazing hitting from roy. This match and the one against south africa show that roy is now becoming a serious hitter. He time the ball so well. English batting unit looking is looking very deadly.

  • izzidole on March 31, 2016, 10:56 GMT

    Thebatsmanholdingthebowlerswilley: Wasn't Paul Farbrace the England cricket coach earlier too and lost his job and was brought back only just before the English cricket season when he was Sri Lanka coach? If Farbrace was that good why is he the assistant coach? England is not only dependent on cricketers from overseas but also foreign coaches especially the old enemy the aussies? Shame. Besides Bayliss there is Jason Gillespie the current coach of Yorkshire and Michael Devinuto coaching Surrey in English County Cricket. Eoin Morgan was not part of the England test team. As such the credit for the resurgence of the England cricket team in recent years should go to Australian Trevor Bayliss.

  • YorkshirePudding on March 31, 2016, 10:43 GMT

    @Lmaotsetung, well they technically have about 8 weeks off as the first test isn't until the 27th May, before the start of the international summer in England, though I wouldn't mind them playing the odd FC game on/around the 15th May to get back into knick ahead of the Tests.

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