ICC Cricket World Cup 2011 / Features

Big leads, and lefties galore

Also: highest scores in a final Test, longest unchanged XIs, scoring most of the team's runs, and identical first and last matches

Steven Lynch

January 15, 2013

Text size: A | A

Paul Harris dismissed Virender Sehwag to get his 100th Test wicket, South Africa v India, 1st Test, Centurion, 3rd day, December 18, 2010
Paul Harris: played his first and last Tests in Cape Town, against India, between January 2 and 6 © AFP
Enlarge

Was South Africa's lead at the end of the first day of the first Test against New Zealand the largest ever by the side batting second? asked Kesh Govinder from South Africa
After bowling New Zealand out for 45 before lunch on the first day of last week's Test in Cape Town, South Africa had motored to 252 for 3, a lead of 207, by the end of the first day. This turns out to be third on the list - and it's one already headed by South Africa, who demolished Zimbabwe for 54 in Cape Town in 2004-05, then zoomed to 340 for 3 by stumps, a lead of 286. The other instance of a lead of 200 or more for the team batting second on the first day came at Lord's in 1896, when Australia were shot out for 53 before England made 286 for 8.

Australia included seven left-hand batsmen in the Sydney Test - is this a record? asked Susan Betts via Facebook
The inclusion of seven left-hand batsmen was a new record for Australia - they had had 20 previous instances of six, the first coming in the home series against Pakistan in 1983-84. There were also six in the first two Tests of the recent Sri Lankan series, and the return of Mitchell Starc for the third Test in Sydney took the number of lefties to seven, the others being Ed Cowan, Phillip Hughes, Mike Hussey, Mitchell Johnson, Matthew Wade and David Warner. There have been 11 other instances of a Test side including seven left-handers, all fairly recently by Sri Lanka and West Indies - but the overall record is eight, by West Indies in two Tests in 2000, against Pakistan in Georgetown (Jimmy Adams, Curtly Ambrose, Chris Gayle, Adrian Griffith, Wavell Hinds, Ridley Jacobs, Brian Lara and Nixon McLean) and England at The Oval (when Mahendra Nagamootoo played instead of Gayle).

What is the highest score ever made by a Test player in his retirement match? asked Nirmal from India
Five players have scored 200 or more in what turned out to be their last Test match. The highest score by someone who never played again was 325 - Test cricket's first triple-century - by Andy Sandham for England against West Indies in Kingston in 1929-30. Then comes Bill Ponsford's 266 for Australia against England at The Oval in 1934. But if you mean the highest score by someone who had already announced he would be retiring, then I think the answer is 258, by Seymour Nurse for West Indies against New Zealand in Christchurch in 1968-69. Sandham played on for Surrey for a few years, and never officially retired from Test cricket. Ponsford might have known it was his last match, but didn't actually announce his retirement until early in the 1934-35 Australian season, saying: "Test cricket has become too serious. It is not a game anymore but a battle." Aravinda de Silva (206 for Sri Lanka v Bangladesh in Colombo in 2002) and Jason Gillespie (201 not out for Australia v Bangladesh in Chittagong in 2005-06) are the others to end their Test careers in grand style with the bat.

I believe England hold the record for the most successive Test matches with the same team. Is that right, and who holds the equivalent ODI record? asked Alex Baxter from London
You're right, England do hold the record for the most consecutive Tests with an unchanged team - the same 11 players made up the side in six successive matches in 2008. That beat the previous record of five Tests, which had happened nine times in all - the first such instance was by England in the 1884-85 Ashes series Down Under. The record for fielding an unchanged side in one-day internationals belongs to Pakistan, who put out the same XI in seven successive matches early in 2002. South Africa have managed two different runs of six matches unchanged (in mid-1999 and early 2004).

Michael Slater once scored 123 out of a total of 184. Is this the highest percentage score by a batsman when his team has been all out? asked Mohit Garg from India
That solo effort by Australia's Michael Slater came against England in Sydney in 1998-99, and his 123 out of 184 constituted 66.84% of the innings total. That remains the closest approach yet to a record actually set in the very first Test of all, in Melbourne in 1876-77, when another Australian, Charles Bannerman, made 165 (retired hurt) in a total of 245 against England, or 67.34%. For the full list, click here.

Paul Harris, who's just retired, played his first and last Tests against the same opposition, on the same ground, on the same days of the year. Surely this must be unique? asked Ethan Rocky
Paul Harris made his Test debut for South Africa against India in Cape Town, in a match that stretched from January 2-6, 2007, and four years later played what turned out to be his final Test, against India, in Cape Town, in a match that lasted from January 2-6. I've learned over the years to assume that almost every oddity in cricket has actually happened before, however unlikely it seems, and Aslam Siddiqui, an ardent Facebooker, came up with another example, saving me a lot of legwork! Ghulam Ahmed, the offspinner who occasionally captained India, made his Test debut against West Indies in Kolkata in a match that started on December 31, 1948, and ended on January 4, 1949 - and his last Test was against West Indies, in Kolkata, from December 31, 1958, to January 4, 1959.

Steven Lynch is the editor of the Wisden Guide to International Cricket 2013

RSS Feeds: Steven Lynch

© ESPN EMEA Ltd.

. Your ESPN name '' will be used to display your comments. Please click here to edit this.
Comments have now been closed for this article

TopTop
Email Feedback Print
Share
E-mail
Feedback
Print
Steven LynchClose
Steven Lynch Steven Lynch won the Wisden Cricket Monthly Christmas Quiz three years running before the then-editor said "I can't let you win it again, but would you like a job?" That lasted for 15 years, before he moved across to the Wisden website when that was set up in 2000. Following the merger of the two sites early in 2003 he was appointed as the global editor of Wisden Cricinfo. In June 2005 he became the deputy editor of Wisden Cricketers' Almanack. He continues to contribute the popular weekly "Ask Steven" question-and-answer column on ESPNcricinfo, and edits the Wisden Guide to International Cricket.

    Duminy's downward spiral

Numbers Game: The start to JP Duminy's Test career was impressive, but in the last three-and-a-half years he has done little to justify his place in the team

    Other fish to fry

Diary: With cricket thin on the ground, Karthik Krishnaswamy goes looking for seafood and strange fruit in the West Indies

    Are behavioural problems afflicting amateur cricket?

All Out Cricket: The amount of verbal and physical violence in club games is disillusioning many players and officials

Third Ground

Mudar Patherya remembers the diverse characters he met while playing at the Kolkata Maidan
The Cricket Monthly August issue

News | Features Last 3 days

Starc zooms to 100 wickets in record time

Stats highlights of Mitchell Starc's record-breaking ODI career

Ashwin's rare double, and stellar comebacks for Shami, Bhuvneshwar

India's marks out of ten after they beat West Indies 2-0 on their Caribbean tour

Similar failings mar Tests at historical venues

The lack of play in Port-of-Spain and Durban over the last four days points to a disregard for common-sense scheduling and a failure to equip grounds to deal with bad weather

Authorities exposed by lack of covers

Foolish logistical planning paired with inadequate drainage infrastructure meant no play on days two and three at Queen's Park Oval despite mostly sunny skies

Pakistan's big leap in 24 months

They were trampled by Rangana Herath, they lost Saeed Ajmal to an illegal action, they endured Alastair Cook's historic double-hundred. But Pakistan overcame all of that and more in the past two years to become No. 1

News | Features Last 3 days

World Cup Videos