India v Australia, 2nd Test, Bangalore, 4th day October 12, 2010

Ponting counters Indian dominance, again

India seemed to get everything right on an action-packed fourth day but the Australia captain ensured his bowlers were in with a chance
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The Australians wouldn't exactly have been craving it, but a tour to India is not quite complete if you haven't experienced the home side getting on a roll. That's when the Indians go mad. The ball starts turning and jumping, or reversing, the fielders start diving and throwing accurately, faltering keepers don't let anything through, thousands of people appeal along with the 11 on the field. In that crazy atmosphere, that mad dance, that mayhem, the opposition melts. As though they are caught in the headlights and have nowhere to go.

It was something South Africa faced at Eden Gardens earlier this year. South Africa had reached 218 for 1 in 58 overs but they also lost eight wickets for 53. Harbhajan Singh took three in two overs, VVS Laxman ran backwards to take a catch, three from their middle order got themselves out, and Zaheer Khan got one with a pick-up-and-throw.

Australia haven't experienced that kind of roll on this tour. They have only been at the receiving ends of two semi-rolls, in the second innings of both the Tests. In the second of those, today, credit should go to Ricky Ponting for not freezing when wickets were falling around him, and not letting India develop it into a full-fledged roll.

That India started to get on one came as a bit of a surprise. Following Sachin Tendulkar's dismissal for 214, an innings that put India into a position from where they could bat Australia out, India ambled without any direction into the second session. MS Dhoni and the tail looked to neither preserve wickets to waste enough time nor hit out and go for a win.

The immediate result was a collapse of 5 for 9, and it was followed by an average bowling start. As Shane Watson and Simon Katich added 58 without trouble, it seemed Australia would have to make an adventurous declaration on the fourth morning to make something out of this situation.

Suddenly Pragyan Ojha produced an accurate arm ball. Suddenly Harbhajan got one to bounce and turn. Suddenly the crowd was woken from up from a collective power nap. The whole Chinnaswamy Stadium appealed almost every ball.

Dhoni, in ordinary form behind the stumps so far, held on to a sharp catch. He then followed to show the effectiveness of his newly acquired habit. When he is keeping to the spinners nowadays, he has zero follow-through. And every time he collects the ball, he whips the bails off. That might have seemed a bit unnecessary to some, but when - post routine - he saw Michael Clarke stranded on the line, sucked there by an offbreak, he erupted in joy.

Three wickets had fallen in six overs, and India were in their mad dance now. Cheteshwar Pujara hardly let anything go past his close-in positions, although nothing carried to him. Suresh Raina often made one-handed pick-ups-and-throws. The umpires were under pressure with extremely close shouts in almost every over.

Between this semi-roll and roll, though, stood Ponting, with his third score in the 70s out of four innings. He batted with resolve, scored off anything half loose, and managed to get the fielders out of his face. He seemed to be on his way to playing his most important innings in India, but then Zaheer intervened. His third solid innings on the tour may have ended in disappointment, but Ponting has given Australia something to bowl at.

India, though, will be pleased that Zaheer and Sreesanth came back the way they did. That all four bowlers, for the first time in the series, worked together as a unit would have pleased them the most. That the pitch still hadn't quite become a horror to bat on. Sachin Tendulkar later credited the bowlers for coming back from the early wobble, but wasn't taking anything for granted.

"It's going to be a big day for us tomorrow," he said. "The Test match is at a critical stage. It's all about how we deal with pressure and apply ourselves.

"We don't want to take anything for granted. It's going to be exciting and that's what I can say. It's going to be a wonderful day."

Wonderful day indeed, but also the last of the "series".

Sidharth Monga is an assistant editor at Cricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Jeptic on October 15, 2010, 4:39 GMT

    In the history of cricket, since the onset of WI and other big teams, England providd the WEAKEST bowling attack. Having said that, Sir Don's average would have been less but not to the pont where any other cricketer would have even come close. I am an Indian fan but this is true about The Don.

    However, barring The Don, I think that Sachin is the best the game has ever seen. Anyhow, Ponting always used to ask for a two tier system when Auss was on top. Does he still want that???

  • Proteas123 on October 14, 2010, 14:07 GMT

    To compare Sachin with the Don is crazy. If batting was so easy back then other batman would also have the high averages. They don't even come close. Sachin has had it easier because of weaker opposition and batting on dust bowls, he wouldn't score the runs against Larwood and Co, he couldn't do it against Donald and SA fast bowlers.

  • on October 14, 2010, 10:33 GMT

    At the end of the day cricket wins. Thats what we are looking for.Congratulations!!

  • sonofchennai on October 13, 2010, 10:29 GMT

    why would an article on Ponting's batting in one inning invite readers to compare Sachin and bradman...absolute nonsense....enjoy the batting of every great bastman we see in our life time

  • on October 13, 2010, 7:00 GMT

    ponting better than bradman....

  • Ajay_the_puritan on October 13, 2010, 6:13 GMT

    i can't take this s*it about don and sachin anymore. statistics is an ass. it makes kirsten a better batsman than vishwanath. don played almost all of his cricket against the poms. they weren't really great shakes with ball then as they are not now. some idiots argue that lara reached some landmark in fewer innings than sachin did. sigh! either they have not heard of something called acceleration or they think all comparisons should stop at that particular landmark. whatever sachin did 'afterwards' which lara didn't is out of their purview. ??? 21 years...sachin has equalled don there. without any gaps in between. 21 years with a billion hopes? tall task for any tom, dick or don.

  • on October 13, 2010, 6:08 GMT

    Bradman cannot be compared with Sachin, it was easy to score runs during Bradman's era and he made full use of it.

  • on October 13, 2010, 5:59 GMT

    @Davo47 is just jealous...Sorry buddy, Punter can never reach our Sachin's record.. Too bad for you...

  • srikp on October 13, 2010, 5:43 GMT

    What is with the screening of the comments? I had submitted some thoughts but was no posted. A reason for not posting would have been great. I realize you get a lot of posts but then being callous is not the exact attitude with the viewers/users of Cricinfo.

  • QTS_ on October 13, 2010, 4:53 GMT

    Bradman is insuperable by definition. If there has been or will be a paradigm of batsmanship, Bradman defines it. Cricket has changed and will continue to change, but Bradman has stretched the limits to the maximum. Imagine a batsman performing for twenty years in the form of Richards 1976, Yousuf 2006 or Tendulkar 2010. The figures, in his case, do pure justice, simply because his statistics are outlandishly better than the next person.

  • Jeptic on October 15, 2010, 4:39 GMT

    In the history of cricket, since the onset of WI and other big teams, England providd the WEAKEST bowling attack. Having said that, Sir Don's average would have been less but not to the pont where any other cricketer would have even come close. I am an Indian fan but this is true about The Don.

    However, barring The Don, I think that Sachin is the best the game has ever seen. Anyhow, Ponting always used to ask for a two tier system when Auss was on top. Does he still want that???

  • Proteas123 on October 14, 2010, 14:07 GMT

    To compare Sachin with the Don is crazy. If batting was so easy back then other batman would also have the high averages. They don't even come close. Sachin has had it easier because of weaker opposition and batting on dust bowls, he wouldn't score the runs against Larwood and Co, he couldn't do it against Donald and SA fast bowlers.

  • on October 14, 2010, 10:33 GMT

    At the end of the day cricket wins. Thats what we are looking for.Congratulations!!

  • sonofchennai on October 13, 2010, 10:29 GMT

    why would an article on Ponting's batting in one inning invite readers to compare Sachin and bradman...absolute nonsense....enjoy the batting of every great bastman we see in our life time

  • on October 13, 2010, 7:00 GMT

    ponting better than bradman....

  • Ajay_the_puritan on October 13, 2010, 6:13 GMT

    i can't take this s*it about don and sachin anymore. statistics is an ass. it makes kirsten a better batsman than vishwanath. don played almost all of his cricket against the poms. they weren't really great shakes with ball then as they are not now. some idiots argue that lara reached some landmark in fewer innings than sachin did. sigh! either they have not heard of something called acceleration or they think all comparisons should stop at that particular landmark. whatever sachin did 'afterwards' which lara didn't is out of their purview. ??? 21 years...sachin has equalled don there. without any gaps in between. 21 years with a billion hopes? tall task for any tom, dick or don.

  • on October 13, 2010, 6:08 GMT

    Bradman cannot be compared with Sachin, it was easy to score runs during Bradman's era and he made full use of it.

  • on October 13, 2010, 5:59 GMT

    @Davo47 is just jealous...Sorry buddy, Punter can never reach our Sachin's record.. Too bad for you...

  • srikp on October 13, 2010, 5:43 GMT

    What is with the screening of the comments? I had submitted some thoughts but was no posted. A reason for not posting would have been great. I realize you get a lot of posts but then being callous is not the exact attitude with the viewers/users of Cricinfo.

  • QTS_ on October 13, 2010, 4:53 GMT

    Bradman is insuperable by definition. If there has been or will be a paradigm of batsmanship, Bradman defines it. Cricket has changed and will continue to change, but Bradman has stretched the limits to the maximum. Imagine a batsman performing for twenty years in the form of Richards 1976, Yousuf 2006 or Tendulkar 2010. The figures, in his case, do pure justice, simply because his statistics are outlandishly better than the next person.

  • piecricket on October 13, 2010, 4:40 GMT

    Actually you can compare Tendulkar and Bradman by the simple fact that Bradman has better statistics than Tendulkar and only played a third of the matches Tendulkar has.

  • Rooboy on October 13, 2010, 4:17 GMT

    @Davo47 - spot on. Laughable is the only way to describe these comments proclaiming Tendulkar better than the Don. I find the comments about the different conditions Bradman played under compared to Tendulkar particularly hilarious ... any reasonable person would deduce that if Bradman had such an advantage playing in his era, why didn't everyone from the Don's era average 99? Or 80 or even 70? The suggestion seems to be that there was an advantage but no one else benefitted from it, it just followed the one player around *lol*. The simple fact is that Bradman is so far ahead of everyone else it is clear there is no comparison

  • Joji_ on October 13, 2010, 4:00 GMT

    Lolz... for once I thought this article was about Ponting, how fool of me... a couple of lines about his batting brilliance before starting up the same old song of indian achievements. :)

  • cric_lover143 on October 13, 2010, 3:51 GMT

    Idont know what is the fuss about Bradman - Sachin - Ponting comparison.. Its totally absurd... all of them are great players and will be considered as legends of cricket in the future also.. but for those Sachin Bashers, what do this man has to do to prove his worth??? he has got almost every record as far as a batsman is concerned.. Bradman's era was different from what we have now.. entirely different way of playing cricket... so how can we do the comparison...

  • Fan84 on October 13, 2010, 3:28 GMT

    @SakthivelS.. you're right buddy,,iam sure Ricky would play untill he turns 40 and go to england and RETAIN Ashes in their soil,, he is just 35 and played 147 tests and i hope by the time he plays 170 tests he can become the highest scorer in the history of test cricket .. he is an Outsatnding captain and Master fileder ,, and a charming skipper ,, good luck ricky

  • srikp on October 13, 2010, 3:09 GMT

    @Davo47 - Mate please wake up!!!

    Don Bradman in this day and age might not have lasted 10 years....we are all making hypothetical comments. Don lasted 20 years in cricket and played only 52 tests. In those days some tests did not have a set time to end and besides they had rest days and what not.

    Watching at the scores made during those days, they easily made over 400 runs in a day in most matches. So that speaks volumes of the quality of bowling. Also, with no television and playing it as a gentlemans' game (till Bodyline happened), there was no undue pressure or risk on a batsman.

    So if you wish to compare Don's stats with Sachin then you are living in a dream. I am not saying Sachin is the greatest but his stats are in no way less commendable than Don's.

  • on October 13, 2010, 3:06 GMT

    I think Ponting has well and truly redeeemed himself in India. He was Harbhajan"s bunny, by his own admission. He has led from the front and this innings more than anything else will stand him in good stead in the Ashes. I think this tour has demonstrated that Ponting still has fuel in his belly and will see through the Ashes quite comfortably as a batsman and probably make a big mark on it. He has struggled to lead with a bunch of inexperienced bowlers and a nervy Hauritz whom the Indians have relished getting into. This tour has been good for Australia, they may lose 2-0 but they have really given the Indians a scare after all this is our home territory and we are a much better and more experienced team. what a great day in prospect and as I write from Bangalore with just an hour to go for the start, it is still cloudy. It seems like an English day, full of cloud cover and with the prospect of rain.Sadly Dhoni did not want to win till Australia lost a couple of wickets! sridhar

  • on October 13, 2010, 3:03 GMT

    There was a time when the gap between ponting and sachin for number of test tons was just 3. Now Sachin is a clear leader with a gap of 10. The only person at the moment by form and record to beat this record would be Sehwag

  • Something_Witty on October 13, 2010, 3:00 GMT

    Great to see Punter back in good form. I've got him down for a hundred at the Gabba.

  • soorajiyer on October 13, 2010, 2:43 GMT

    I believe the only person who can comment on who is better is no more - which is Sir Don himself. I am sad I did not live at the time Don was playing, but I am happy to have born in the era of Sachin Tendulkar.. I keep saying this - guys this might be our last chance to see Ricky, Sachin, Rahul and Lax in action in a series! So enjoy the moment..

    But I just dont understand why is not clarke's head being called for. Brad Hidge is 10000 times better batsman than this fella!

  • GauravAndCricket on October 13, 2010, 2:36 GMT

    @ Davo 47: The very fact that u r comparing Sachin with Bradman shud be enough for Sachin. It speaks highly of him. Btw i didnt know that Bradman cud come out with diplomatic statment. Its a shame that u think like this for the lord of cricket. Ball Tampering?? haha.. the ICC cleared it so it doesnt matter what u think. Ponting - lets not even get into this discussion. He is a very high class batsman and thats it. We can see his captiancy on show in this test series....

  • Amu123 on October 13, 2010, 1:35 GMT

    I always love these fights of the greatest batsmen... i would just like to point out that, we should always remember that any bowling attack would always do whatever they can to get a batsmen out... so whether sir don played only against england or not should be irelevant when we try to analyse who is the best batsmen... when we play cricket we understand how hard it is to concentrate & bat for hours,,, imagine scoring 2 300's, 12 double hundreds... have we at least done that in club cricket?? guess no... technology or not any opposition would do whatever they could to get the wicket... never forget bodyline series... sir don played during that period.. if u ask me,, sir don is no.1 & sachin is no.2... there is a gap between sir don & sachin.. howeverthe gap between sachin & 3rd would be much bigger... simplly for the fact that, this guy has been able to do what he has been doing for 20 years... he has been no. 1 for such a long time. top 2 greats r confirmed,...... then Lara & others

  • on October 13, 2010, 1:08 GMT

    Bradman's batting record is like Murali's bowling record within Sri Lanka.. both are like an Everest.. But Sachin is the best batsman today, without a doubt. And has been one of the top two for almost 17-18 years now. That says a lot as well! No player has lasted this longer, at the top, ever before! That, and the amazing individual he is off and on the field (read- no sledging), separates him from the crowd, that includes Ponting.

  • SubJ on October 13, 2010, 1:07 GMT

    @Davo47 - I can't help but laugh at your wits, or the lack of them. There's no point arguing with you 'coz I understand I watch more films than cricket. Get well soon!

  • on October 13, 2010, 0:56 GMT

    Refusal of using UDRS is not the end of the world. In fact umpires should not be made to stand in the hot sun everyday of a test match and see their decisions overturned by the illusion of a camera. None of the technologies are 100 per cent. None of them are 3 dimensional. Of course a lay man will not accept this if I say a player when given out should walk without showing dissent even if he was hard done by the decision, but the fact of the matter is that cricket is a gentleman's game. Also the fact that no player should be given the power of overturning any decisions made by the on field umpires. If the umpires want to check in, that is another matter of debate. But refusal to use UDRS is not a bad thing, it in fact is a brilliant move by the BCCI. The traditions of this wonderful sport must be kept intact.

  • Krishish on October 13, 2010, 0:40 GMT

    @Davo47, agree with you on the batting heirarchy bit The Batting Heirarchy is clearly Bradman> Sachin> Ponting The stats Bradman achived are incredible. And his scoring rate was amazing as well. There could be a lot of iffs and buts.. as to what if he played 100+ tests and what if he played in the Subcontinent ? But the fact remains that on the evidence available, he is simply the greatest.

    Sachin is clearly number 2 in the all time list..the debate intensifies after that..

    also, we shouldnt let our backgrounds come into play when recgnising true greatness..I am an Indian incase you guys were wondering.

  • johnsrini on October 13, 2010, 0:06 GMT

    I think India should play for a draw. That assures the series. Remember the famous Kolkata test may not have been that famous if Steve Waugh had played safe. At that time the Aussies were leading the series.

  • nanban2000 on October 13, 2010, 0:02 GMT

    @Davo47 - blowing your own trumpet again mate. First of all your comparison is very wrong because cricket has drastically changed in the last few decades, so you can't compare Bradman's time cricket with these days. Also, Bradman had retired from cricket more than 6 decades ago and you still sing his praise (not that I am against it, use current day players to compare statistics). It clearly shows that after Bradman you don't have any good players for you to praise (atleast to compare with Tendulkar). Looks like you are following punter's footstep...don't whine, give little credit to other players/team who perform well and lastly please come to reality - punter and boys can't win all the games, so be sportive...

  • on October 12, 2010, 22:34 GMT

    I wish next time BCCI will be smart enough to have at least a 3 test match series against Australia. Can anyone predict who will win the ODI series? I'm on 51% Australia and 49% India right now. Really depends on who they pick for the squad. I surely wish to see Irfan Pathan in action, as he is a very good all rounder. Good luck, Team India

  • Ravishankara on October 12, 2010, 22:29 GMT

    India was lucky last match - VVS was there to bail us out - I am not sure whether any one can repeat that act - The first innings lead is not just enough - Disappointed to see the hard work of Sachin & Vijay going waste

  • CustomKid on October 12, 2010, 22:19 GMT

    Well said Davo47 - DG Bradman achieved his feat with out protective helmets, decent gloves, pads, and wickets were never covered. That alone puts him daylight and who ever people want to argue about.

    As for aalkool - had UDRS been used Vijay would have been LBW for 40 odd rather than making 139 and SRT may have also been given to hilf well before he made 200. So your argument is null and void. Umpires aren't machines and make mistakes. Sometimes they go your way sometimes they don't - if your board or batsmen are stupid enough to not want the system then naturally your going to get a decision that doesn't go your way. What makes it worse is the fact there are replays to prove the stupidity of not having the system.

  • Maui3 on October 12, 2010, 21:13 GMT

    Amazing, every article or Newspaper seem to think India is ahead at the end of Day 4. A target of 250 would be beyond India's reach. Even 200 would be a real stretch, given that 200+ is seldom achieved in India in the 4th innings, although India has done it 2 or 3 times in the recent past. No laxman, 3 inexperienced players (Vijay, Pujara and Raina) and Sachin perhaps not reovered from his 1st innings exhaustion will put a lot of pressure on no-longer-very-awesome Dravid. The hope would be Sehwag hangs around for a session. But, I would rate aussie win at about 65% to India's at 20% with 15% chance for a draw (barring no bad weather). It'll be exciting for sure.

  • Deenesh on October 12, 2010, 21:03 GMT

    Its gonna be epic tomorrow. Enjoy, cuz its def the last time Ponting gores up against the golden generation stars of india in india in a test. Nostalgic to da maxx..

  • ProdigyA on October 12, 2010, 20:43 GMT

    @Davo47 - You can never really compare Bradman and Sachin, cause when Bradman days there was no TV or Media to judge wat kind of attack, pitches, situations etc he played in. One thing for sure is cricket has changed massively since the early nineties where there was no concept of reverese swing or doosra etc. Based on mere statistics, yes he is better than Sachin, n in all honesy i do have respect for the old fella. As far as ricky and sachin goes, you are smart enough to accept the fact. and Ball Tampering, wake up my friend, we are talking about the days when ball tampering wasnt even illegal, he was trying to break a thread from the ball, and wat sachin did was in total ignorance, in total presense of everybody, and defintely not with the intention of changing the behaviour of the ball, watch the video if u did not. And yes, sachin cannot be punter, cause he never whines, sledges like punter. Cheers.

  • dessi-munda on October 12, 2010, 20:29 GMT

    hawk eye showed punter was out.when he was given lbw.he was clearly out when he was on 40.(lbw by harbhajanen )but umpire gave him not out.even that time hawk-eye showed the ball would have hit the middle and leg stump. i know husey was dobutful.but why smithie saying punter was not lbw.go look at the reply again bud.

  • MiddleStump on October 12, 2010, 19:20 GMT

    1. Ponting is a very good batsman; that he ranks a bit below Sachin is hardly an insult. 2. Ponting unfortunately is not a good captain, certainly not in India. Nagpur in 08, Mohali last week being just a few examples. 3. Hauritz would do well to remind Ponting periodically tomorrow that he is in the playing XI. Otherwise he may not get to bowl. 4. UDRS is long overdue regardless of which system is used. India have had the worst of the decisions but (unfortunately!) did not lose in Mohali to learn this lesson. 5. Lastly, but for Sachin scoring 214 and contributing a few leg byes, India would be following on now and trying to avoid an innings defeat. Scary thought. So much for those who think that scoring in the second innings is somehow worth more than the first.

  • on October 12, 2010, 19:10 GMT

    5th para, last line: ustralia would have to make an adventurous declaration on the *fifth* morning to make something out of this situation.

  • manasvi_lingam on October 12, 2010, 19:09 GMT

    Tendulkar would rank among the top 10 of all time, but there's no point in calling him better than Bradman - the stats don't lie. However, the focus should be on the match. If Sehwag and Dravid fail again, then India will lose the match since there is no Laxman and Sachin has already played one big innings. Dhoni is hopeless and Raina and Pujara are too new. Vijay may/may not do well. And once the ball starts reversing the batting will collapse so one has to try and score as much with the new ball and against Hauritz.

  • Razor88 on October 12, 2010, 19:02 GMT

    I Agree With Both "Smithie" and :Tushar Agarwal"

    UDRS is a gr8 Equipment,i really dono when our board gonna take it... Every Technology has its own good and bad...

    Both CA and BCCI squeezed this schedule dude can't help it..... simple reason Aussies wan't some match Practice and some momentum before the ashes... And the Indians wan't to Crush a Depleted Aussies to Raise their Points in the Ranking Before Going to SA ...... And now the way the Kiwi's are performing in ODI it would be Opportunity for us to Close in the gap in ODI No.1 Ranking..... India is the only team which can stop the World Champs..... Hopefully!!!!

  • aalkool on October 12, 2010, 19:00 GMT

    I agree, UDRS should have been used. Ponting would have been back in the hut for 21.

  • Chapelau on October 12, 2010, 18:34 GMT

    Fascinating position with one day left. Great effort from Ponting, but as already said, not in Tendulkar's class.... will be interesting to see how Swanny's bunny performs in his last test series in the winter. As for best batsman ever - Tendulkar is truly brilliant but Ravi - I agree with you on most stuff but have to admit Bradman will never be bettered.

  • on October 12, 2010, 18:27 GMT

    @Smithie...Which match are u talking about? Ponting was clearly out and he even had a life at 27.3.. Starting to sound like Pakistan fans, arent u?

  • David47 on October 12, 2010, 18:15 GMT

    @ravithecricbuff - I wont give you a whip, but having played grade cricket for the little town of Bowral in NSW, so knowing a little about Bradman, I will provide a response. After Tendulkar's great double hundred in this test Cricinfo brought up the table of most double hundreds in test cricket. It showed that SRT had scored his sixth, in 171 tests. At the top of the table there is a guy called Bradman, who scored 12, in just 52 tests. Says it all really, but I'll leave you with a modified line from the movie Titanic - for Sachin to dream that he is even close to as good as Bradman is to beleive that angels might fly out of his ..........(yes, and I know what the Don said about him - he was just being diplomatic). As for Ricky? - great effort with the bat in this series. He's not quite as good as Sachin as a batsman - he's never pretended to be. But he is a more successful captain - oh, and he's never been found guilty of ball tampering.

  • SakthivelS on October 12, 2010, 18:13 GMT

    Don't worry Ricky. These are tiring and unresponsive pitches. Never measure your teams strength and weakness on these dusty bowls.... For quite sometime, i have one personal thing to say to you. Captaincy is not always a tasty one. But when it becomes too much mind-boggling, one has to relinquish that. You are a very good batsman. But when you are relieved of captaincy, you are free to be yourself and you can reach many more peaks. I feel that you can play as a batsman till you are 41.

  • bumsonseats on October 12, 2010, 18:09 GMT

    as a pom im sorry to say, i expect the aussies to win this test. i thought the indian batting this morning to be inept. they were looking to draw the test and win the series.

  • ram5160 on October 12, 2010, 18:05 GMT

    @ Smithie, Dude, In both dismissals, the ball was shown to be just shaving the stumps. Meaning they were within the margin of error for Hawkeye. In such cases, even if UDRS was there, the final decision would have gone back to the on-field umpire's one. Ditto for the Sachin dismissal at Mohali 1st innings. That's the way I think it works with UDRS but I may be wrong. Otherwise I agree with u that its high time for UDRS in India. P.S Hussey was caught at Gully in 1st innings, perhaps ur talking about Mohali?

  • Quazar on October 12, 2010, 18:04 GMT

    Ponting was batting beautifully indeed...probably the best he's ever batted in India. So credit to him. But even UDRS would have ruled him out Lbw in both innings since the ball was hitting the stumps each time and so the 3rd ump wouldn't have overruled the on-field umpire. In fact, UDRS would have ruled him out Lbw to Harbhajan much earlier when Gould gave him the benefit of the doubt (replays should pad before bat and ball hitting middle). Actually, Hussey is the one who has been truly unlucky twice in this series. But then again, Gambhir got a shocker in Mohali in the 2nd inngs and Ishant got a bad decision too. But yes, I too hope the BCCI will adopt UDRS soon...though I'm sure it's gonna happen eventually.

  • Smithie on October 12, 2010, 17:27 GMT

    whatever the outcome of the game it has been marred by umpiring errors again with both Ponting and Hussey out in both innings to LBW calls that would have been overturned if UDRS was in use. When is the BBCI going to get real? I guess only when they lose a few Tests to bad umpiring calls. Poor Punter has been on the wrong end of Billy's crooked digit soooooh many times!

  • Aussasinator on October 12, 2010, 17:14 GMT

    His wicket early on was crucial. Indian bowlers have been bowling rather defensively to him in the two tests rather than in a wicket taking manner, including Harbhajan.

  • Xcrictic on October 12, 2010, 16:55 GMT

    last of the great generation. won't see every often. aus will have to rebuild from scratch after ponting.

  • on October 12, 2010, 16:44 GMT

    Keep my fingers crossed for a fitting finale of an enthralling series.

  • on October 12, 2010, 16:29 GMT

    why cant tour program deciders work on removing ODIs and increase 2 more tests between two best teams in the world...its a pity right guys

  • ram5160 on October 12, 2010, 16:15 GMT

    Ponting was brilliant today. If only he had support from Clarke and North, it could have been a different story. Ominous sign for the englishmen before the ashes, I guess. Still disappointed though that we hadn't seen the best of Ponting before this tour.

  • Razor88 on October 12, 2010, 16:12 GMT

    Its a Very Very Good Effort By Ponting....... But its not enuf to beat INDIA these days.... In Hockey where Aus Beat Ind(Old Champs) and became World champs..... It would be nice if India Can do that against Aus in Cricket....

  • ravithecricbuff on October 12, 2010, 16:05 GMT

    Am not a big fan of Ponting...just because he comes across as very arrogant dude...but I salute his resilient batting..he may never be equal to Sachin ...latter being the greatest ever (may be Bradman lovers would like to give me a whip?), but he did no harm to strengthen his followers' believe that he is as good as anyone!!

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  • ravithecricbuff on October 12, 2010, 16:05 GMT

    Am not a big fan of Ponting...just because he comes across as very arrogant dude...but I salute his resilient batting..he may never be equal to Sachin ...latter being the greatest ever (may be Bradman lovers would like to give me a whip?), but he did no harm to strengthen his followers' believe that he is as good as anyone!!

  • Razor88 on October 12, 2010, 16:12 GMT

    Its a Very Very Good Effort By Ponting....... But its not enuf to beat INDIA these days.... In Hockey where Aus Beat Ind(Old Champs) and became World champs..... It would be nice if India Can do that against Aus in Cricket....

  • ram5160 on October 12, 2010, 16:15 GMT

    Ponting was brilliant today. If only he had support from Clarke and North, it could have been a different story. Ominous sign for the englishmen before the ashes, I guess. Still disappointed though that we hadn't seen the best of Ponting before this tour.

  • on October 12, 2010, 16:29 GMT

    why cant tour program deciders work on removing ODIs and increase 2 more tests between two best teams in the world...its a pity right guys

  • on October 12, 2010, 16:44 GMT

    Keep my fingers crossed for a fitting finale of an enthralling series.

  • Xcrictic on October 12, 2010, 16:55 GMT

    last of the great generation. won't see every often. aus will have to rebuild from scratch after ponting.

  • Aussasinator on October 12, 2010, 17:14 GMT

    His wicket early on was crucial. Indian bowlers have been bowling rather defensively to him in the two tests rather than in a wicket taking manner, including Harbhajan.

  • Smithie on October 12, 2010, 17:27 GMT

    whatever the outcome of the game it has been marred by umpiring errors again with both Ponting and Hussey out in both innings to LBW calls that would have been overturned if UDRS was in use. When is the BBCI going to get real? I guess only when they lose a few Tests to bad umpiring calls. Poor Punter has been on the wrong end of Billy's crooked digit soooooh many times!

  • Quazar on October 12, 2010, 18:04 GMT

    Ponting was batting beautifully indeed...probably the best he's ever batted in India. So credit to him. But even UDRS would have ruled him out Lbw in both innings since the ball was hitting the stumps each time and so the 3rd ump wouldn't have overruled the on-field umpire. In fact, UDRS would have ruled him out Lbw to Harbhajan much earlier when Gould gave him the benefit of the doubt (replays should pad before bat and ball hitting middle). Actually, Hussey is the one who has been truly unlucky twice in this series. But then again, Gambhir got a shocker in Mohali in the 2nd inngs and Ishant got a bad decision too. But yes, I too hope the BCCI will adopt UDRS soon...though I'm sure it's gonna happen eventually.

  • ram5160 on October 12, 2010, 18:05 GMT

    @ Smithie, Dude, In both dismissals, the ball was shown to be just shaving the stumps. Meaning they were within the margin of error for Hawkeye. In such cases, even if UDRS was there, the final decision would have gone back to the on-field umpire's one. Ditto for the Sachin dismissal at Mohali 1st innings. That's the way I think it works with UDRS but I may be wrong. Otherwise I agree with u that its high time for UDRS in India. P.S Hussey was caught at Gully in 1st innings, perhaps ur talking about Mohali?