Australia in India 2013-14 October 12, 2013

Australia's ODI wonders in India

38

Australia's solitary Test series victory in India since 1969-70 is one of the more humbling statistics in the record of the world's 'winningest' cricket country. The series ledgers alone - 2-0, 0-0, 1-0, 2-1, 2-1, 1-2, 2-0, 4-0 - tell a tale of ignorance, difficulty in adjusting, and lessons often learned too late in a tour, then invariably forgotten in time for the start of the next one. Those results would suggest that there is no more difficult place on earth for an Australian cricket team to prosper, not least in the years after the greats began to retire in 2007.

Yet the Antipodean ODI tale on the subcontinent is more about triumph than humiliation. Starting with a 1987 World Cup victory that marked the official start of Australian cricket's regeneration under Allan Border and Bob Simpson, the 50-over format has brought something near to consistently strong results in India. Since 1998, when regular international series contact between the two countries was resumed after a mid-1990s freeze-out phase, Australian teams have emerged triumphant in five out of the six limited-overs series contested there, whether they be triangular tournaments as in 1998 and 2003, or bilateral visits on other occasions.

They also won the 2006 Champions Trophy and reached the quarter-finals of the 2011 World Cup. In 2009, Ricky Ponting's team managed to claw to a 4-2 victory despite having a full XI first-choice players absent injured.

These series victories have come in a range of circumstances, whether after a Test series or standing alone. The only time Australia have not won a limited-overs contest against India in recent times is 2010, when the one match of three not to be washed out resulted in a home victory at Vizag after a high-scoring chase. But otherwise, the tourists have found themselves excelling away from home at a vast assortment of venues, from Bangalore in the south and Mumbai on the west coast, to Mohali in the north and even Guwahati on the distant eastern fringes. A multitude of factors can be pointed to by way of explanation, but here are a few of the most salient.

A history of success

Confidence in the knowledge that those before you have achieved great things in India has helped Australia's ODI teams ever since Border lifted the Reliance Cup aloft at Eden Gardens 26 years ago. The doubts, phobias and conspiracy theories that cloud the mind of an Australian Test cricketer on the subcontinent tend to fall away for one-day matches, while the roars of Indian crowds feel less claustrophobic and distracting for the knowledge that they have not stopped the visitors before. Individuals, too, have benefited from strong records there. Shane Watson, Mitchell Johnson, Michael Clarke and Ricky Ponting have all fared better in ODIs than Tests, while the likes of the tweakers Nathan Hauritz and Brad Hogg have held their own in coloured clothing despite being swatted away in the five-day game.

More familiar pitches

Australia's stand-in captain, George Bailey, believed this to be one of the most critical factors in the team's greater level of comfort relative to Tests. Where five-day wickets are commonly worn, spitting and spinning, Indian groundsmen prepare their most even-tempered surfaces for limited-overs contests, sometimes allowing grass to hold them together and so granting fast bowlers a little more assistance. Add this to the swing that can be occasionally generated in early starts and the picture becomes far more familiar to Australian players. Damien Fleming, Nathan Bracken, Doug Bollinger and Johnson all profited from early morning seam and swing at various times, while Shaun Marsh, Cameron White, Michael Hussey, Ponting and Watson have played freely without worrying too much about the ground beneath their feet.

Less reliance on spin

Another notable quality to Indian ODI surfaces is the fact that they seldom require the selection of a team brimful with quality spinners. Australia's preferred reliance on fast men with the odd slow bowler for variety has worked effectively, with Shane Warne, Hauritz and Hogg playing fair supporting roles. It is arguable the ability of the pacemen to make headway in 50-over matches on the subcontinent has at times lulled the national selectors into thinking that the same might occur in Test matches, but the differences in pitch preparation have generally conspired against the success of such a tactic.

A lower key

It cannot help a team to view anywhere as the final frontier, even if the 2004 tourists managed to accomplish a Test series win while embracing the idea of India as their last mountain. The pressure Australian Test players feel in India, both in the middle of the ground and from the edges, has inhibited their performances at times, timid strokes and indifferent bowling spells reflecting the sense that the world is closing in around them. By contrast, that feeling tends to be on the other side during ODI series. No nation loves the one-day game more than India, and the expectations upon the home team for ODI tournaments that mean little in the wider scheme have allowed an unfancied Australia to sneak up on them more than once. The 2011 World Cup quarter-final in Ahmedabad is a notable exception.

Ricky Ponting's captaincy

Three ODI series in India for three victories is one of many garlands Ponting gained over a storied career, though as he has noted it will be one of many obscured by the loss of three Ashes series. Nonetheless, his calm leadership, sparkling but sturdy batting and peerless example in the field contributed greatly to a legacy of limited-overs confidence on Indian shores. In this, Ponting shares something in common with Border. Both men provided a solid core around which transitional teams swirled and bubbled, while they showcased a greater tactical alacrity in 50-over matches that occasionally eluded them in Tests. His binding together of the injury-strewn 2009 tour party was something few on the tour will forget. Before departing, Bailey consulted Ponting about how best to tackle the current series. There was no better man to ask.

Daniel Brettig is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • wellrounded87 on October 14, 2013, 2:18 GMT

    I think Brettig is pretty on song here. There are two factors that differentiate India and Australia. Spin and Swing. Spin is India's strength (both bowling spin and playing spin) while it's Australia's weakness (again both bat and bowl). The opposite is true for Swing. I think it's fair to say that the makeup of the pitch goes a long way to determining the outcome between these two sides.

    On a side note i hope Maddisson gets a go in this series. He looks a real talent and has performed superbly with the opportunities he's been given.

  • vikpai on October 14, 2013, 7:54 GMT

    You have missed a test series here: 2-0: 1978-79, 0-0: 1986-87, 1-0: 1996, 2-1:1997-98, 2-1: 2001, 1-2: 2004-05, 2-0: 2008, AND 2-0:2010!! 4-0 : recently concluded 2012-13 series.

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on October 14, 2013, 7:07 GMT

    Aus' ODI record is impeccable in the so called 'lion's den' having dealt out several big thrashings to home team in a country which is by far the toughest for touring sides - esp. non-subcontinent 1s - and is just 1 of too many glittering feats achieved that arguably the greatest team ever- at the time -have to their name.Though enviable , the record is hardly a 'wonder' when it is achieved by the 'mighty Aussies ' , and the most 'wonder'-ful fact is they would have being favourites going in to almost all those series,a rarity for a visiting team facing Ind.Good article,must say that brought some of the memories of the last great team and their 'wonderful' records.

  • mysay on October 14, 2013, 3:25 GMT

    Chitra Kasinathan, While the bowlers are at it, how about the batsmen joining them at the nets to cope up with 150 + KMH deliveries.

  • on October 13, 2013, 22:14 GMT

    I think Both teams r good, India have better batting line up and Australia have better bowling attack :) both teams r good in fielding :P Australia shown us really disciplined bowling...it was a good win today.. best of luck Australia

  • on October 13, 2013, 20:13 GMT

    MSD should come at no.4 while chasing .he will have enough overs to counter attack with Raina, Kohli and Jadeja. Please drop Ishant, Ashwin and Vinay and bring in Mishra Unakdat and Zak if available and fit. Else Mohit. Ashwin needs to go back to nets. He is trying different things in a match which is not a testing ground He can do so in the nets. Same applies to Ishant. Hope selectors note this. Let better council prevail. kashinath

  • Number_5 on October 13, 2013, 19:52 GMT

    I dont think there is any doubt that pitches prepared for for ODIs around the world tend to be flatter than those prepared for Test matches. The interesting thing for mine that is touched on in this article is that there is huge gap between the pitches prepared for Tests and ODIs in India. Add this to the comments from a groundsman who said he specifically prepared the pitch outside leg stump NOT to turn for Shane Warne when he played there and you start to get a clearer picture on some of the differences between Aus Test and ODI fortunes in India. I really enjoyed seeing some the up and coming players from both teams perform in this match and find Baileys' captaincy refreshing. Lets hope for another absorbing contest and a "fair" pitch in the next game.

  • on October 13, 2013, 10:26 GMT

    Daniel has forgotten the 2-0 scoreline in the Test series in India of October 2010. Austalia's first whitewash in over 30 years, home and away.

  • on October 12, 2013, 22:16 GMT

    Well Mr. Brettig .... I can honestly say that I enjoyed reading the reality found in the Comments over your story on the Ancient History of ODI's by Australia in the Subcontinent.

    The evident increase in talent in India is pronounced.

    The decrease in talent in Austra ..... allow me to rephrase this .... the continued selection of substandard players by the Australian Team is ridiculous.

    Doherty and Hughes touring India again.

    Ferguson, Coulter-Nile, Maxwell ..... Australia has better players than this.

    Again I will say "Queensland are the current Domestic OD and T20 Champions (currently hammered with the prospect of 8 games in 16 days to defend their title thanks to the ACB) .... not one Queenslander in the Team!!!"

    The key to the series for the Australian Team will be Aaron Finch and James Faulkner. Hopefully they will be ably supported and the series won't be over by the 5th Game.

  • on October 12, 2013, 19:27 GMT

    The core difference between previous Indian sides & this one - Shreenath, Prasad, Prabhakar & Bhajji was definitely a more potent bowling attack than Ashwin, Jadeja, Bhuvi, Ishant & Vinay....but Raina, Yuvaraj, Dhawan, Kohli, Sharma, Jadeja - as fielders are far better than any previous Indian fielding side that . The quality of the fielding support means these bowlers know that every bad ball they bowl will not be punished. They can relax & bowl, as a result they make fewer mistakes. Eve Ponting / Waugh's original sides would have had their hands full, playing against this Indian side.

  • wellrounded87 on October 14, 2013, 2:18 GMT

    I think Brettig is pretty on song here. There are two factors that differentiate India and Australia. Spin and Swing. Spin is India's strength (both bowling spin and playing spin) while it's Australia's weakness (again both bat and bowl). The opposite is true for Swing. I think it's fair to say that the makeup of the pitch goes a long way to determining the outcome between these two sides.

    On a side note i hope Maddisson gets a go in this series. He looks a real talent and has performed superbly with the opportunities he's been given.

  • vikpai on October 14, 2013, 7:54 GMT

    You have missed a test series here: 2-0: 1978-79, 0-0: 1986-87, 1-0: 1996, 2-1:1997-98, 2-1: 2001, 1-2: 2004-05, 2-0: 2008, AND 2-0:2010!! 4-0 : recently concluded 2012-13 series.

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on October 14, 2013, 7:07 GMT

    Aus' ODI record is impeccable in the so called 'lion's den' having dealt out several big thrashings to home team in a country which is by far the toughest for touring sides - esp. non-subcontinent 1s - and is just 1 of too many glittering feats achieved that arguably the greatest team ever- at the time -have to their name.Though enviable , the record is hardly a 'wonder' when it is achieved by the 'mighty Aussies ' , and the most 'wonder'-ful fact is they would have being favourites going in to almost all those series,a rarity for a visiting team facing Ind.Good article,must say that brought some of the memories of the last great team and their 'wonderful' records.

  • mysay on October 14, 2013, 3:25 GMT

    Chitra Kasinathan, While the bowlers are at it, how about the batsmen joining them at the nets to cope up with 150 + KMH deliveries.

  • on October 13, 2013, 22:14 GMT

    I think Both teams r good, India have better batting line up and Australia have better bowling attack :) both teams r good in fielding :P Australia shown us really disciplined bowling...it was a good win today.. best of luck Australia

  • on October 13, 2013, 20:13 GMT

    MSD should come at no.4 while chasing .he will have enough overs to counter attack with Raina, Kohli and Jadeja. Please drop Ishant, Ashwin and Vinay and bring in Mishra Unakdat and Zak if available and fit. Else Mohit. Ashwin needs to go back to nets. He is trying different things in a match which is not a testing ground He can do so in the nets. Same applies to Ishant. Hope selectors note this. Let better council prevail. kashinath

  • Number_5 on October 13, 2013, 19:52 GMT

    I dont think there is any doubt that pitches prepared for for ODIs around the world tend to be flatter than those prepared for Test matches. The interesting thing for mine that is touched on in this article is that there is huge gap between the pitches prepared for Tests and ODIs in India. Add this to the comments from a groundsman who said he specifically prepared the pitch outside leg stump NOT to turn for Shane Warne when he played there and you start to get a clearer picture on some of the differences between Aus Test and ODI fortunes in India. I really enjoyed seeing some the up and coming players from both teams perform in this match and find Baileys' captaincy refreshing. Lets hope for another absorbing contest and a "fair" pitch in the next game.

  • on October 13, 2013, 10:26 GMT

    Daniel has forgotten the 2-0 scoreline in the Test series in India of October 2010. Austalia's first whitewash in over 30 years, home and away.

  • on October 12, 2013, 22:16 GMT

    Well Mr. Brettig .... I can honestly say that I enjoyed reading the reality found in the Comments over your story on the Ancient History of ODI's by Australia in the Subcontinent.

    The evident increase in talent in India is pronounced.

    The decrease in talent in Austra ..... allow me to rephrase this .... the continued selection of substandard players by the Australian Team is ridiculous.

    Doherty and Hughes touring India again.

    Ferguson, Coulter-Nile, Maxwell ..... Australia has better players than this.

    Again I will say "Queensland are the current Domestic OD and T20 Champions (currently hammered with the prospect of 8 games in 16 days to defend their title thanks to the ACB) .... not one Queenslander in the Team!!!"

    The key to the series for the Australian Team will be Aaron Finch and James Faulkner. Hopefully they will be ably supported and the series won't be over by the 5th Game.

  • on October 12, 2013, 19:27 GMT

    The core difference between previous Indian sides & this one - Shreenath, Prasad, Prabhakar & Bhajji was definitely a more potent bowling attack than Ashwin, Jadeja, Bhuvi, Ishant & Vinay....but Raina, Yuvaraj, Dhawan, Kohli, Sharma, Jadeja - as fielders are far better than any previous Indian fielding side that . The quality of the fielding support means these bowlers know that every bad ball they bowl will not be punished. They can relax & bowl, as a result they make fewer mistakes. Eve Ponting / Waugh's original sides would have had their hands full, playing against this Indian side.

  • Cpt.Meanster on October 12, 2013, 17:42 GMT

    @Sachin_vvsfan: I have to disagree with you. I don't think this series is meaningless. I do like a 5 ODI series better than 7 though. But, this is an important series in many aspects. With the next world up in less than 2 years, it is imperative both teams identify their strengths and weaknesses. Obviously, the world cup won't be in ASIA but that doesn't mean you cannot strategically plan your team set up. I always find it ridiculous how people can call a series like this irrelevant when they are ready for a back to back Ashes contest inside 6 months time ?! The return Ashes series is one of the biggest farce in cricket's itinerary. If that's interesting, well this is interesting as well. I can't wait for this series to start.

  • sachin_vvsfan on October 12, 2013, 17:24 GMT

    Long weekend(no /limited access to internet) and i did not even realize that the one off T20 was over. sachin's retirement articles overshadowed this.

    Not Sure if there is anything meaningful in this series. Find F1 more interesting and looking forward to Indian GP.

  • Cpt.Meanster on October 12, 2013, 16:45 GMT

    Mr. Brettig is clearly clutching on to old straws here. This Australian team is no where as good as the one Ponting had many years back. I honestly can't see Australia win anything more than a game in this long series. India will win convincingly. However, I will not deny the fact that Australia have some very charming players in their ranks. Beginning with Aaron Finch, then Shane Watson, and Glenn Maxwell to name a few. At best, Australia can utilize this series to ensure some of their players get noticed by IPL scouts for next year's auction. I am sure Aaron Finch will go for a hefty price given his recent performances. Shane Watson is already a household name in the country and George Bailey has played for CSK. Apart from that, it will be tough for Australia. I just hope it's a clean, controversy free series.

  • JustIPL on October 12, 2013, 16:20 GMT

    India are limited overs champs and whatever their bowlaing gives away is easily taken back by their strong lineup of cricket ball hitters. India can finish any chase fantastically and can set tough targets batting first. So, Aussies are not really in a good chance of winning in limited overs fixtures. Even in tests they faltered in india.

  • on October 12, 2013, 16:16 GMT

    It is so relaxing to just put up your feet and relish sweet memories of PAST successes. But one has to work hard to get positive results for FUTURE. In any field! I am betting that Bretting will agree with me on that!

    For a moment, let us look at the immediate future!

    India's supposed to be superiority in batting (in ODIs) is adequately (or even more than adequately?) matched with guys like Watto, Finch, Maxwell, and even the young Maddisson!. If three of these four clicks in any match, Oz wins. If two of them hit big and have long innings, Advantage OZ.

    This theory will be put on its head, If any of the four from the Indian team -Dhawan, Raina , Yuvi & Dhoni does the same three card or two card trick.

    So, it is going to be evens Stevens.

    Should admit, that bowlers from both sides are not that intimidating; but prove me wrong! Either side! Please!

    So, it is going to be a batsmen's series and every match is going to be anybody's match!

  • on October 12, 2013, 16:04 GMT

    We won and so all was well as it ended well: however ODI is a different ball game altogether and to have openers like Rohit and bowlers like Ishant Sharma, who never learn, might turn out too much of a liability. Rohit : A). When reqd. run rate is 10-12 runs in the initial power play, to keep defending or leaving balls outside the off-stump is the last thing expected. One over economical and reqd run rate gallops. In ODIs AM HOPING TO C HIM SCORE AT 2 RUNS AN OVER. B). Despite his defence he gets out in the same pathetic fashion every time and will never learn or it is just too big a weakness for him to overcome. Ishant: Agreed that none our bowlers have ever learnt to bowl Yorkers but that also doesn't mean that bowling short and wide or overpitched is the only option. The guy rarely impresses & on top of that, pathetic fielding. If these extra runs given, are added to his economy, he will be nowhere in contention very soon. Lets hope they somehow change and perform better.

  • dirtydozen on October 12, 2013, 15:50 GMT

    10 years back defeating australia was considered a big thing. But today even kiwis can/ might defeat the aussies. But the fighting spirit of aussies is very high. Even when they were on the verge of losing in the t20 bailey had maintained his calmness as a captain. Despite being an indian fan i feel the aussies can cause a upset against indians. according to me watson, bailey, haddin and johnson would be key for aussies.

  • on October 12, 2013, 15:38 GMT

    Hoping this will be a 5-2 win for India, But definitely can expect some close encounters with and bat and ball..!!! Expecting another "ShikhaaR" from Dhawan.. His tremendous form is giving an edge for India.

  • SamRoy on October 12, 2013, 15:06 GMT

    The most important reason for Australia to graduate from a great team from 1994-1999 (they used to lose sometimes though rarely) to an all-time great team between 1999-2007 was the introduction of Adam Gilchrist. Yes, the other greats (Steve Waugh, Ponting, Warne and McGrath) were there but Gilchrist's introduction made them unbeatable; in fact 3-0,4-0 hammerings (4 or 5 test match) became the norm. Here is the curious case of Gilchrist the batsman. He struggled against India in tests (both home and away) but made an absolute mockery of their bowling in ODIs. Probably the reason why Australia couldn't dominate India in tests in that period save for the 1999-2000 series in Australia (against an inexperienced Indian batting lineup where Dravid, Laxman and Ganguly were in their first test tour of Australia and there was no Sehwag) but completely dominated them in ODIs.

  • on October 12, 2013, 14:35 GMT

    It all depends on resistance of Australian batsman.They had attacking batting lineup that was proved in T20.All they need to show is patience which their batsman lagged.I think decent spells by opening bowlers can put pressure on good Indian batting lineup.Doherty might become as a key if he was accurate as Jadeja.Watson needs to prove himself once again not in form of small cameos but consistency.we need tough battles to make cricket exciting. And we cant compare former Australian team with present.

  • on October 12, 2013, 14:32 GMT

    Pointless series, rot, rubbish, relentless.

  • on October 12, 2013, 13:44 GMT

    Well how can you compare this Aus team with what Ricky had...Ricky loved Indian bowlers and butchered them constatntly without fail..I bet he can do the same even today even in his sleep, Michael clarke and hussey, hayden, Damien Martyn, and even second string aussy fast bowlers were something different. Even today with not much excellent players, they are a competitive side but they lack patience and intelligence like their ancestors. Almost every aussy player was like Ponting or a Hussey, attacking and building innings at the same time and bowlers using interesting tricks to scare jumpy Indian batsman. U-19 tours and changed that for India to a huge extent and Virat Kohli is the optimum example. Even in Tests, results were very close than the scoreline will show. Since the last few days of Waugh the law of diminishing return started working and is still in process.

  • Sushrutdhakal on October 12, 2013, 13:33 GMT

    @ ravi_hari This not test series mate to finish with scoreline of 4-1 or you expect 2 matches to be washed off

  • on October 12, 2013, 13:15 GMT

    The way India responded to a big ask in the lone T20 couple of nights ago is really remarkable. This shows that we want to crush AUS this time around. Come on Ind - go for the kill. A whitewash will be a great Diwali gift for the whole of India.

  • on October 12, 2013, 12:30 GMT

    There is a possibility for Aussies to win another ODI series in India..you never know..Aussies always played well in subcontinent,especially in ODI series...

  • slackers11 on October 12, 2013, 12:04 GMT

    It will be fascinating to read the same article after India beats Australia 7-0 this series. The quality of the Aus team has gone down but the attitude of its supporters remains the same.

  • landl47 on October 12, 2013, 11:57 GMT

    This is an excellent historical overview. I'm not sure whether it has any bearing on this series, since both sides are substantially different from the teams which played in 2010. Any team which has Finch and Watson has a chance in a limited overs game, but it's hard to see Australia winning more than one or two games in this series. If they win the series, it will be one of the great upsets of modern times.

    P.S. Daniel, I think you meant 'acuity' rather than 'alacrity' in the last paragraph. The decisions were sharper, not faster.

  • on October 12, 2013, 11:50 GMT

    India is a late starter in all forms of cricket except 20-20 internationals where they have won the inaugural world cup itself. Why it took so much time is mainly because of lack of good bowling and too much opportunities to stars.

  • on October 12, 2013, 11:26 GMT

    Yep, Aussies can keep thinking about their past while India is looking at the present and the bright future..

  • Ragav999 on October 12, 2013, 11:19 GMT

    Ponting is generally a more positive and believing captain when he is batting well. It is not tactical acumen or aggression, but just complete faith in himself and his team. He is akin to a momentum trader in stock market. Just look at his peak batting efforts and the team's successes coinciding with each other so frequently. He is more confident and probably walks out to the field as a captain that his team is destined to win after batting well in the limited overs. It is a stellar example of "The power of positive thinking". He turned it around with his speech in dressing room in the famous Adelaide Test in 2006-07 Ashes and backing it with man of the series performance.He is the prime example of success breeds success. His batting peak between 2000 and 2007 is an absolute proof of self fulfilling prophesy. I assume he went in to every match knowing that he will be on the winning side and that spurred his batting even when he went in at the fall of very early wicket.

  • Ragav999 on October 12, 2013, 11:11 GMT

    In fact, even in Tests, Australians should rely less on spin especially in India (by going with 4 quicks) as the track record of any overseas spinner in India is horrible than you would expect from a decent fourth seamer if selected in his place. Just look at the way Australian and SA fast bowlers have performed in the Tests in India. McGrath has a better record in India than his overall career average. It is not an indictment on the spinners. It is their spinners who bowl a lot of overs and give away the runs at a quick rate in Tests and pick up those few tail end "free" wickets at the end. The momentum shifts against the foreign teams are too great to risk playing a spinner in India in test matches. I think Australia would have won at least one Test in each of their last 2 tours to India had they just picked their 4 best fast bowlers. Only concern is the over rate, which can be compensated by adequate planning of fields and some urgency between overs.

  • Shaggy076 on October 12, 2013, 10:07 GMT

    Mr Brettig I think it is very simply explained, India determination to win test cricket involves creating pitches where any average spinner can become unplayable. However as far as one day cricket it is about a firm wicket, entertainment and many runs. Which given Indians bowling attack being so average doesnt suit them. Looking at the two sides both teams seem to have the ability to score a lot of one-day runs will it be Australias more dangerous bowling attack that prevails again.

  • PrasPunter on October 12, 2013, 9:55 GMT

    That sums up our dominance in ODIs in India. Dating further back, we won the tri-series in 1998 ( zimbabwe being the other team ) and the bilateral series in 2001 3-2. In-fact, since the loss in 1996 in a tri-series played along with SA, the WC 2011 was the first ODI series that we have lost in india, ignoring the one-off match in 2010. Since 1998, our record is as follows.

    1) Tri-series victory ,1998, with Zim 2) Bilateral series 3-2, 2001 3) Tri-series victory , 2003 with NZ 4) Champions Trophy 2006 5) Bilateral series 4-2 , 2007 6) Bilateral series 4-2 , 2009

    God bless Aus !!!

  • ravi_hari on October 12, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    Performances of teams have changed in different formats and one should consider Australia a great team for the consistant ODI winning record in India. While their test performances declined after every series reaching a new low last series. However, ODI teams have shown rare consistancy and will be hoping to repeat it. However, I feel this time it would be very difficult for Aussies to end up on the winning side. With Clarke also absent the middle order is totally brittle. Secondly, people like Watson thrive on the occasions when they are left free and alone. The moment you put responsibility on their shoulders, they wilt. The same applies to Jhonson. Two key players may not perform in this series. The rest will find it difficult to come to terms with the pitches, crowd and their form. Bailey, being a stop-gap leader will not be inspiring to the team. Even if he performs as an individual may not really pep up the team. I foresee a 4-1 win for India, unless Indians throw it away.

  • Jaffa79 on October 12, 2013, 9:26 GMT

    The boards of India, Australia and England need to stop thinking of money. All these teams do is play each other constantly and it is getting boring. Nice in a way because England have the wood other the other two but every series is just an exercise in money making.

  • ICCexpert.... on October 12, 2013, 9:18 GMT

    i think australia are favourites to win this series, because they have roger binny and madan lal, India is a weak side, if they play lala amarnath they will win...but i think bishen singh bedi should debut agianst australia

  • anupkeni on October 12, 2013, 9:03 GMT

    Ricky Ponting as Australian captain has won 4 ODI series in India: 1) TVS Cup Tri-Series in October-November 2003 featuring India, Australia and New Zealand. 2) ICC Champions Trophy in October-November 2006 featuring 10 teams. 3) Bilateral 7 match ODI series 4-2 (with 1 washout) in September-October 2007. 4) Bilateral 7 match ODI series 4-2 (with 1 washout) in October-November 2009.

  • Chopman on October 12, 2013, 8:50 GMT

    Australia also won the 1984 one day series in Indua 3 nil under the captaincy of Kim Hughes. Even more extraordinary considering that this was Australia's first ever one day series in India. Thank you Daniel for a fascinating article. Nearly forty years of sterling Australian performances in ODI's in India.

  • Chopman on October 12, 2013, 8:50 GMT

    Australia also won the 1984 one day series in Indua 3 nil under the captaincy of Kim Hughes. Even more extraordinary considering that this was Australia's first ever one day series in India. Thank you Daniel for a fascinating article. Nearly forty years of sterling Australian performances in ODI's in India.

  • anupkeni on October 12, 2013, 9:03 GMT

    Ricky Ponting as Australian captain has won 4 ODI series in India: 1) TVS Cup Tri-Series in October-November 2003 featuring India, Australia and New Zealand. 2) ICC Champions Trophy in October-November 2006 featuring 10 teams. 3) Bilateral 7 match ODI series 4-2 (with 1 washout) in September-October 2007. 4) Bilateral 7 match ODI series 4-2 (with 1 washout) in October-November 2009.

  • ICCexpert.... on October 12, 2013, 9:18 GMT

    i think australia are favourites to win this series, because they have roger binny and madan lal, India is a weak side, if they play lala amarnath they will win...but i think bishen singh bedi should debut agianst australia

  • Jaffa79 on October 12, 2013, 9:26 GMT

    The boards of India, Australia and England need to stop thinking of money. All these teams do is play each other constantly and it is getting boring. Nice in a way because England have the wood other the other two but every series is just an exercise in money making.

  • ravi_hari on October 12, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    Performances of teams have changed in different formats and one should consider Australia a great team for the consistant ODI winning record in India. While their test performances declined after every series reaching a new low last series. However, ODI teams have shown rare consistancy and will be hoping to repeat it. However, I feel this time it would be very difficult for Aussies to end up on the winning side. With Clarke also absent the middle order is totally brittle. Secondly, people like Watson thrive on the occasions when they are left free and alone. The moment you put responsibility on their shoulders, they wilt. The same applies to Jhonson. Two key players may not perform in this series. The rest will find it difficult to come to terms with the pitches, crowd and their form. Bailey, being a stop-gap leader will not be inspiring to the team. Even if he performs as an individual may not really pep up the team. I foresee a 4-1 win for India, unless Indians throw it away.

  • PrasPunter on October 12, 2013, 9:55 GMT

    That sums up our dominance in ODIs in India. Dating further back, we won the tri-series in 1998 ( zimbabwe being the other team ) and the bilateral series in 2001 3-2. In-fact, since the loss in 1996 in a tri-series played along with SA, the WC 2011 was the first ODI series that we have lost in india, ignoring the one-off match in 2010. Since 1998, our record is as follows.

    1) Tri-series victory ,1998, with Zim 2) Bilateral series 3-2, 2001 3) Tri-series victory , 2003 with NZ 4) Champions Trophy 2006 5) Bilateral series 4-2 , 2007 6) Bilateral series 4-2 , 2009

    God bless Aus !!!

  • Shaggy076 on October 12, 2013, 10:07 GMT

    Mr Brettig I think it is very simply explained, India determination to win test cricket involves creating pitches where any average spinner can become unplayable. However as far as one day cricket it is about a firm wicket, entertainment and many runs. Which given Indians bowling attack being so average doesnt suit them. Looking at the two sides both teams seem to have the ability to score a lot of one-day runs will it be Australias more dangerous bowling attack that prevails again.

  • Ragav999 on October 12, 2013, 11:11 GMT

    In fact, even in Tests, Australians should rely less on spin especially in India (by going with 4 quicks) as the track record of any overseas spinner in India is horrible than you would expect from a decent fourth seamer if selected in his place. Just look at the way Australian and SA fast bowlers have performed in the Tests in India. McGrath has a better record in India than his overall career average. It is not an indictment on the spinners. It is their spinners who bowl a lot of overs and give away the runs at a quick rate in Tests and pick up those few tail end "free" wickets at the end. The momentum shifts against the foreign teams are too great to risk playing a spinner in India in test matches. I think Australia would have won at least one Test in each of their last 2 tours to India had they just picked their 4 best fast bowlers. Only concern is the over rate, which can be compensated by adequate planning of fields and some urgency between overs.

  • Ragav999 on October 12, 2013, 11:19 GMT

    Ponting is generally a more positive and believing captain when he is batting well. It is not tactical acumen or aggression, but just complete faith in himself and his team. He is akin to a momentum trader in stock market. Just look at his peak batting efforts and the team's successes coinciding with each other so frequently. He is more confident and probably walks out to the field as a captain that his team is destined to win after batting well in the limited overs. It is a stellar example of "The power of positive thinking". He turned it around with his speech in dressing room in the famous Adelaide Test in 2006-07 Ashes and backing it with man of the series performance.He is the prime example of success breeds success. His batting peak between 2000 and 2007 is an absolute proof of self fulfilling prophesy. I assume he went in to every match knowing that he will be on the winning side and that spurred his batting even when he went in at the fall of very early wicket.

  • on October 12, 2013, 11:26 GMT

    Yep, Aussies can keep thinking about their past while India is looking at the present and the bright future..