India v Australia, 6th ODI, Nagpur October 30, 2013

Better off using bowling machines - Dhoni

ESPNcricinfo staff
246

MS Dhoni backs bowlers to adjust to tough rules

Until a couple of weeks ago, India had never chased down a target over 350. Now, they've done it twice in three completed matches. While India's chase of 351 against Australia in Nagpur on Wednesday featured more success for Shikhar Dhawan, another Virat Kohli special and helped the team draw level in the series with one to play, it left captain MS Dhoni questioning the new ODI rules once again.

"I think [the rules are] something that we need to sit and think about if 350 is the new 280 or 290 or 300," Dhoni said after the match. "With the rule changes and everything, most of the bowlers are getting smashed with the extra fielder inside. Even the best of the bowlers, the fast bowlers, are bowling with third man and fine leg up.

"It was more of a fight as to which side bowls less badly. With the extra fielder inside, if you are slightly off target, it goes for a boundary. A few of the bowlers are disappointed, they actually feel it will be better off to put a bowling machine there. It is a new challenge for the bowlers."

Dhoni was referring to the new rule that came into play from October 30, 2012, which allows only four fielders outside the 30-yard circle in non-Powerplay overs. Dhoni had earlier voiced his doubts over the new rules, which have visibly been limiting his already-thin bowling resources in this series. Before the Champions Trophy in England in June, which India had won, he had said the rules would pose one of the biggest challenges for his side. At the toss in Mohali during this series, Dhoni said something to the tune of "I don't know what they want us to do [with all the new rules]". Then, his team-mate Suresh Raina had spoken out against the rules in Ranchi.

In all, three times in four completed games in this series targets of over 300 have been chased down successfully - and in India's case, with relative ease. Dhoni said such run scoring could hurt the one-day game. "I don't know where it is going. Is it good in the long run that we are seeing - for seven hours - only fours and sixes?"

While there was some smart batting from his team-mates in Nagpur, Dhoni said the dew and the rules meant the chase was "slightly easy". "Shikhar of course got a century, but with Rohit [Sharma] it was one of the days when he wasn't getting the gaps and it would have been easy to get frustrated when you are looking to chase 350. But he absorbed the pressure, and then converted the start and by the time he got out he had a decent strike rate.

"We knew a bit of dew will come later. And now it is slightly easy. You can break it into Twenty20 games. At 30 overs, if we need even 170-odd runs with wickets in hand, and with one more Powerplay and the extra fielder inside [the circle] … 180 is something every team will look to achieve in the last 20 overs."

Dhawan and Rohit set up the chase with their fifth century stand in ODIs this year, before Kohli once again showed how lethal he is in the chase - he scored his 11th century in 69 chases, and India have won all 11 of those matches. He made batting look simple, Dhoni said. "Virat was brilliant. As the ball got old, with the kind of fast bowlers they have and a bit of reverse swing, they were attacking almost all the batsmen. But he counterattacked. He was maintaining a good position when going for the big shots. He made it look easy.

"When I went in to bat, it was difficult for the new batsman. But the way he took the pressure off the new batsman, it was amazing."

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • RaadQ on October 31, 2013, 13:14 GMT

    Agree with Dhoni. There has obviously been many moves to make batting easier shorter boundaries, bigger bats, flat pitches, powerplays, 2 balls and now the fielding restrictions. I think that's one too many and they should revert the fielding restrictions as well as keep 1 new ball, bringing the reverse swing/spin factor back. There has to be some balance, otherwise the sport is no longer 'cricket'. We cannot lose the essence of the competition between bat and ball.

  • KPWij on October 31, 2013, 1:18 GMT

    The new rules over the last few years will significantly impact statistics as well as the psychology/methodology of all bowlers in the one day game. Scores in excess of 300 will be the norm on good surfaces and bowlers will need to develop a variety of yorkers and bouncers to contain sides. The contest of bat versus ball will decline until bowlers adapt and series such as the current Australia v India series may be normal from now on unless we get some green wickets giving the bowlers a chance. Personally high scoring games are wonderful to watch once in a way but too many of these games deflates the value of scoring runs. Personally, I would go back to 1 ball per innings, this will bring back the spinners, reverse swing for the fast bowlers and only the softer ball makes it more of a challenge for the batsmen. This change would definitely drag scores back down and the contest between bat and ball can be retained! The series so far has been excellent batting and panicked bowling..

  • on November 3, 2013, 5:52 GMT

    These Rules are not so problematic train our fast bowlers to bowl stump to stump not any Yorker or the bouncer which the great fast bowler Glen mc rath and shaun Pollock uses to bowl which made them good opening bowler no need for bowling Yorker or short balls which they never use it in most of the matches. A good length ball on off stump or on Middle stump is not easy to take for a right handed and its easy to have a caught behind. For A left handed always go for bowling on the Middle stump or on the Leg stump(if err) else on the Off stump the better line,

  • lukiboy on November 2, 2013, 7:17 GMT

    India need to start preparing pitches that give the bowlers something, the ball isn't even turning significantly, no matter what the rules are if they are playing on cement everyone's gonna get carted off to the boundary

  • Zaheerahmed on November 2, 2013, 6:35 GMT

    @Nav & Narsimha - Eat humble pies buddies. "Mediocre" Pakistani team has beaten highly rated Proteas in 2nd ODI after scoring just 209 runs and without the help of bowling machines. Dhoni and his fellow one billion need to grow up and look inwards for their failures and don't blame rules that are making Indian so called fast bowlers operating at 125KPH.

  • Harmony111 on November 2, 2013, 4:42 GMT

    @McGorium:

    Wow, I had no idea Adelaide had 65 mt boundaries. I do know that NZ has some pretty small grounds but my focus was Indian stadia cos it is only these stdia that are criticized for being tiny when they are not small and are about as large as any other stadium in the world. Anything India do is never digestible to some fans and they will find one or he other reason to dilute those good things. It will be either a poor opposition or a flat track or dew or lucky toss or poor umpiring or something that happened on Pluto that will be responsible for India's wins but Indian team itself will not be praised by these guys.

    That is what I wanted to expose here. Thanks for your inputs.

  • McGorium on November 1, 2013, 23:50 GMT

    @ Harmony111: It should also be pointed out that many of the NZ stadiums that cricket is played on are rugby stadiums that are smaller than Nagpur or most, if not all, international stadiums in India. Eden Park, Auckland, is a diamond shaped stadium with short diagonal boundaries. McLean Park, Napier is 50m or so square of the wicket. Adelaide oval has around 65 metres square boundaries. Taunton is another small ground (sri lankans will remember this one from WC 1999). And if the argument is that these grounds have bowler-friendly pitches, it would be wrong. Most ODI games are played on flat tracks regardless of venue. For example, McLean Park boasts of top scores of 373, 347, 340*2, 336,335,324... all scored before the rule change referenced above. With the rule change, you might start seeing 400+ on those grounds.

  • on November 1, 2013, 23:17 GMT

    What rules South Africa vs Pakistan series playing?

  • mzm149 on November 1, 2013, 20:38 GMT

    Instead of bowling machine, one team should use Ishant Sharma and the other one should use Ashok Dinda as the only bowler.

  • Harmony111 on November 1, 2013, 15:46 GMT

    @Dasith Sean Wijesiriwardena:

    You say you saw 10 sixes in the last IPL that were 56-60 metres. Can you enumerate a few of them or are you just throwing a bluff here?

    When I talked of the sizes of the Nagpur Stadium, I gave exact basis of my assertion. You are free to check the footage online to see if I am right or wrong. Can you back your claims like I did?

    I honestly don't remember the distances of the 6s hit in the last IPL but I do remember the distances of the 6s that were hit in the last CLT20.

    The CLT20 matches were played in the same stadia where IPL matches were played and I clearly remember that a large no of 6s that 'just' cleared the ropes were in the range of 72-75-78 metres. A no of 6s that were 90-95 metres were landing approx 12-15 metres behind the ropes. Sadly, I don't remember the exact moments when this happened.

    But by no means can one say that a stadium whose boundaries are 72-75 metres is a tiny stadium.

  • RaadQ on October 31, 2013, 13:14 GMT

    Agree with Dhoni. There has obviously been many moves to make batting easier shorter boundaries, bigger bats, flat pitches, powerplays, 2 balls and now the fielding restrictions. I think that's one too many and they should revert the fielding restrictions as well as keep 1 new ball, bringing the reverse swing/spin factor back. There has to be some balance, otherwise the sport is no longer 'cricket'. We cannot lose the essence of the competition between bat and ball.

  • KPWij on October 31, 2013, 1:18 GMT

    The new rules over the last few years will significantly impact statistics as well as the psychology/methodology of all bowlers in the one day game. Scores in excess of 300 will be the norm on good surfaces and bowlers will need to develop a variety of yorkers and bouncers to contain sides. The contest of bat versus ball will decline until bowlers adapt and series such as the current Australia v India series may be normal from now on unless we get some green wickets giving the bowlers a chance. Personally high scoring games are wonderful to watch once in a way but too many of these games deflates the value of scoring runs. Personally, I would go back to 1 ball per innings, this will bring back the spinners, reverse swing for the fast bowlers and only the softer ball makes it more of a challenge for the batsmen. This change would definitely drag scores back down and the contest between bat and ball can be retained! The series so far has been excellent batting and panicked bowling..

  • on November 3, 2013, 5:52 GMT

    These Rules are not so problematic train our fast bowlers to bowl stump to stump not any Yorker or the bouncer which the great fast bowler Glen mc rath and shaun Pollock uses to bowl which made them good opening bowler no need for bowling Yorker or short balls which they never use it in most of the matches. A good length ball on off stump or on Middle stump is not easy to take for a right handed and its easy to have a caught behind. For A left handed always go for bowling on the Middle stump or on the Leg stump(if err) else on the Off stump the better line,

  • lukiboy on November 2, 2013, 7:17 GMT

    India need to start preparing pitches that give the bowlers something, the ball isn't even turning significantly, no matter what the rules are if they are playing on cement everyone's gonna get carted off to the boundary

  • Zaheerahmed on November 2, 2013, 6:35 GMT

    @Nav & Narsimha - Eat humble pies buddies. "Mediocre" Pakistani team has beaten highly rated Proteas in 2nd ODI after scoring just 209 runs and without the help of bowling machines. Dhoni and his fellow one billion need to grow up and look inwards for their failures and don't blame rules that are making Indian so called fast bowlers operating at 125KPH.

  • Harmony111 on November 2, 2013, 4:42 GMT

    @McGorium:

    Wow, I had no idea Adelaide had 65 mt boundaries. I do know that NZ has some pretty small grounds but my focus was Indian stadia cos it is only these stdia that are criticized for being tiny when they are not small and are about as large as any other stadium in the world. Anything India do is never digestible to some fans and they will find one or he other reason to dilute those good things. It will be either a poor opposition or a flat track or dew or lucky toss or poor umpiring or something that happened on Pluto that will be responsible for India's wins but Indian team itself will not be praised by these guys.

    That is what I wanted to expose here. Thanks for your inputs.

  • McGorium on November 1, 2013, 23:50 GMT

    @ Harmony111: It should also be pointed out that many of the NZ stadiums that cricket is played on are rugby stadiums that are smaller than Nagpur or most, if not all, international stadiums in India. Eden Park, Auckland, is a diamond shaped stadium with short diagonal boundaries. McLean Park, Napier is 50m or so square of the wicket. Adelaide oval has around 65 metres square boundaries. Taunton is another small ground (sri lankans will remember this one from WC 1999). And if the argument is that these grounds have bowler-friendly pitches, it would be wrong. Most ODI games are played on flat tracks regardless of venue. For example, McLean Park boasts of top scores of 373, 347, 340*2, 336,335,324... all scored before the rule change referenced above. With the rule change, you might start seeing 400+ on those grounds.

  • on November 1, 2013, 23:17 GMT

    What rules South Africa vs Pakistan series playing?

  • mzm149 on November 1, 2013, 20:38 GMT

    Instead of bowling machine, one team should use Ishant Sharma and the other one should use Ashok Dinda as the only bowler.

  • Harmony111 on November 1, 2013, 15:46 GMT

    @Dasith Sean Wijesiriwardena:

    You say you saw 10 sixes in the last IPL that were 56-60 metres. Can you enumerate a few of them or are you just throwing a bluff here?

    When I talked of the sizes of the Nagpur Stadium, I gave exact basis of my assertion. You are free to check the footage online to see if I am right or wrong. Can you back your claims like I did?

    I honestly don't remember the distances of the 6s hit in the last IPL but I do remember the distances of the 6s that were hit in the last CLT20.

    The CLT20 matches were played in the same stadia where IPL matches were played and I clearly remember that a large no of 6s that 'just' cleared the ropes were in the range of 72-75-78 metres. A no of 6s that were 90-95 metres were landing approx 12-15 metres behind the ropes. Sadly, I don't remember the exact moments when this happened.

    But by no means can one say that a stadium whose boundaries are 72-75 metres is a tiny stadium.

  • CricketChat on November 1, 2013, 13:07 GMT

    That day is not far when 'SIX Run Derby' will be conducted all over the cricketing world, with the top 10 T20 batsmen playing 20 balls/inning from a ball machine where only 6s count. Much like the baseball's home run derby. Bowlers will become increasingly irrelevant. Runs is what people want to see and businesses will find ways to fulfill them.

  • Arrow011 on November 1, 2013, 12:56 GMT

    Dear ICC, did you people wanted to test these weird rules only in an international one day series / tournaments, were there no takers for this weird rules in the club levels or county sides before coming to internationals? The ODI has become a laboratory for ICC, if this is the way it continues then ODI will die a premature death. All the new rules introduced should be scrapped including free-hit to make the battle between ball & bat more even. It is also time to make a pitches committee to make all pitches like in west indies where pace, spin & batting are all helped. I would rate Indian pitches to be the worst, with batting sides making a feast & bowlers lose confidence.

    Virat Kohli is looking as if he is invicible, in actual he is not, he is a steady innings builder (a little faster scorer than Rahul Dravid), he is consistent & a good player. Comparing him with Sachin is rubbish.

  • Arrow011 on November 1, 2013, 12:38 GMT

    I would say revert back to pre-1992 rules, there was only wide & no ball rules. No power plays, feild restrictions or 2 balls. All were almost akin to test cricket rules. The players should know this is 50 overs cricket & they will automatically try to score as many as possible. The boundaries should be as big as possible for the ground, no puling the rope up, no free-hits & no favour for batsmen. When scores are like the present India Austra series, there is almost nothing for the bowlers & everything for the batsmen. No wonder a grafter like Virat Kohli has become a monster hitter just after the rule change. Sixes & 4s are the norm as Dhoni said. Virat must be the happiest person due to this rule change, now better get back to real cricket.

  • on November 1, 2013, 12:19 GMT

    very well said dhoni - if a bowler is going to be treated like a punching bag for the sake of batsman becoming superstars, then u might as well have a bowling machine. Why waste the time and energy of the bowlers.

  • Vishal63 on November 1, 2013, 12:11 GMT

    7th ODI: As this series has been all about batting and hardly anything about bowling, I strongly suggest that India try something different for the series decider.

    The following squad should be tried:

    1. Rohit Sharma, 2. Shikhar Dhawan, 3. Virat Kohli, 4. Ambati Rayudu, 5. Yuvraj Singh, 6. MS Dhoni (capt & wk), 7. Suresh Raina, 8. Ravindra Jadeja, 9. Bhuvneshwar Kumar, 10. Ishant Sharma, 11. R Vinay Kumar

    The overs can be distributed as follows:

    1. Bhuvneshwar Kumar = 10 overs. 2. Ishant Sharma = 7 overs. 3. R Vinay Kumar = 7 overs. 4. Ravindra Jadeja = 10 overs. 5. Virat Kohli = 3 overs. 6. MS Dhoni = 3 overs. 7. Yuvraj Singh = 5 overs. 8. Suresh Raina = 3 overs. 9. Rohit Sharma = 2 overs.

    Even if the target reaches 350-370, the extra batsman in the squad will do India a great help. Even if we stuck with the same squad, Aussies would still make 340-360, so why not have an extra batsman and let the part-timers leak runs instead of the regular bowlers?

  • Vishal63 on November 1, 2013, 12:07 GMT

    7th ODI: As this series has been all about batting and hardly anything about bowling, I strongly suggest that India try something different for the series decider.

    The following squad should be tried:

    1. Rohit Sharma, 2. Shikhar Dhawan, 3. Virat Kohli, 4. Ambati Rayudu, 5. Yuvraj Singh, 6. MS Dhoni (capt & wk), 7. Suresh Raina, 8. Ravindra Jadeja, 9. Bhuvneshwar Kumar, 10. Ishant Sharma, 11. R Vinay Kumar

    I start by analysing my choices for the bowling department. Anyway, the bowlers are failing and so it would make sense to have a part-timer fail than have a regular bowler fail as the extra batsman can make up for the runs given away. I was strongly against the selection of Ishant Sharma but I do feel that he should be given another chance as it may be the last ODI series that he is a part of.

    For the batsmen, the inclusion of Ambati Rayudu brings more depth into the line-up and if he perform he can make up for the extra runs given.

  • on November 1, 2013, 9:37 GMT

    Not sure why Dhoni isn't touching upon on the point that the pitches here are so bare. We played with the same rules in England and we won the CT 2013. The actual culprits are the Flatttt pitches that we are playing ODIs on. Everyone would agree that the matches played in England were good for viewing because the pitches were conducive for stroke play and also to bowlers. ODIs were getting a little boring and ICC wanted to revive it and thats what it did; but alas, the Indian pitches for ODIs are so Flatt that this (350+) will continue to be the norm.

  • sachinisawesome on November 1, 2013, 8:42 GMT

    MS Dhoni is talking on behalf of Asian teams that spinners are losing the advantage becoz of two ball rule and 4 fielders inside rule which infact was mentioned by the great Hayden during commentary as well. But most of the people commenting against dhoni are Asians itself. Which is baffling becoz India is infact well served with these 4 fielders rule becoz batting is our strength so we can chase any target 8 out of 10 times. Two ball rule is giving advantage to teams like SA, ENG, AUS, NZ who don't have good spinners barring ENG. Most of the Pakistan fans are commenting coz they are just frustrated that they lost 6 wickets for 17 runs. And people who are saying these are excuses. Well our medium fast bowlers performed much much better than all the asian teams in CT. So if they say the pitches were not typical Eng pitches than that's an excuse coz then why your teams scored 180 odd on the same surfaces where we chased them in 30 odd overs.

  • nav84 on November 1, 2013, 8:22 GMT

    @ZaheerAhmed Dhoni's team won two matches chasing 350+. Is currently the Champions Trophy holder and World Champions and No 1 ranked ODI side in the world. Don't think he needs to give excuses for being the best side in the world. As for Pak-SA series is concerned, its just the below club level batting of Pakistan and known inefficiency of SA against spin and nothing else. Same Pak side struggled to score 200 in Champions Trophy in England where Indians regularly scored run a ball. On same pitches, under same conditions. So yes, SA-Pak are playing under same rules but their substandard batting is making the opposition bowlers look a lot better then they are. Losing 6 for 19 runs in an ODI and giving Imran Tahir five wickets in less than 14 overs in a test, its 90% pathetic batting and 10% good bowling.

  • g.narsimha on November 1, 2013, 8:01 GMT

    Zheer Ahmad- i really enjoyed u r coments , u r team could not win a match in ENG- recently held icc- champ- trophy , u r team was thoroughly white washed in tests & odis in the recent tour of SA , last time in AUS - same result , we agree last time in ENG, AUS our team was horreble 2 back to back white wasshes , that was a blessing in disguise, we believe the present team consisting young talent will compate every where , pl just see u r self, where u stand before making undesirable, demeaning coments on others , if ours is the club level bowling what about u r present team - just below club level ,cant chase 180 on SHARJAAH wicket which is not at all deferent from any subcontinental wiskets .lost count how many times u r team shot out in 2 digits, cant win even in ZIM- THEY SHOWED U R RIGHT PLACE .

  • ThumpingWin on November 1, 2013, 7:58 GMT

    I love dhoni but why is he doing this the rules are not the problem here..All the matches are having FLAT tracks thats the problem and more so ever Indian bowlers.. DHoni please dont blame rules and try to save your men..Just prepare good pitches atleast for SPIN if u want but dnt make a fuss and try to save the likes of Ashwin, Vinay, Ishant, Jadeja..Even after conceding 350 twice Australia are not blaming anyone or the rules they know they bowled badly as simple as that..I am losing respect for you now captain cool :(:(:(

  • BustIPL on November 1, 2013, 7:50 GMT

    I dont think it is appropriate to revise the rules just based on the current india aussie series as outside india might need these rules to set a sizable target or chasing one also kohli has scored most of centuries in india or similar conditions in SL/BD and outside india it can be a challenge. Smaller grounds that came into play due to IPL and CLT, flat pitches and shorter boundaries are also contributing to that. With two new balls more fielders can be kept close logically which gives a fair chance to both the teams get better of each other. If one gets advantage of the fielding restrictions facing the two new balls and one bat off course then the other team can restrict other team if they have better bowlers. Yes, outside india with more fielders on the rope will help Ishant & Co save some runs.

  • Baundele on November 1, 2013, 7:31 GMT

    Are the Pakistan-South Africa matches being played under different rules?

  • Zaheerahmed on November 1, 2013, 7:15 GMT

    If your batsmen could only perform on featherbeds and your bowling is club standard then you are better off playing with bowling machines. Didn't with the same rules Pakistan and South Africans struggled to score 200 runs? I am sure Dhoni would have some other excuse when his batsmen and bowlers fail in coming World Cup in Australian continent.

  • CricketFanInLosAngles on November 1, 2013, 5:41 GMT

    Field restrictions, two new balls are killing the game. Watching bowlers being butchered is not fun. ICC has made a mess of the rules and DRS. Should revert to old rules and give Umpires ability to utilize their judgement than just by the rules and technology. One rule I am in favor of adding is MINIMUM distance for boundary.

  • on November 1, 2013, 5:39 GMT

    till 2nd odi india never chased over 300 vs aussie. and that happend twice this series. wat went wrong? even in 2003 WC final the same target in SA we lost that match right from the first ball of ind inngs. its very clear the new odi rules, now we came to know one xtra fielder outside the ring will make very huge difference. 60% boundaries will be cut off which means 2 or 3 runs short per ball , and even fielding team may get wickets also. which will create preasure on chasing team. but now no such preasure batsmen like kohli scoring boundaries like dinking water. four fielders cant restrict bondaries every over may produce atleast 2 loose balls (4s) 8 runs, 3 singles will give 11 runs , wat is tough here to chase.SACHIN AND OTHER BATSMEN SCORED 100s by facing tough bowlers and good field positions. here kohli scoring 100s like gully matches. any bowler will loose his line wen good balls went for 4s after that automatically he bowls a loose ball 8 run over become 14runs.

  • satishsasikumar on November 1, 2013, 5:39 GMT

    I do not agree with people who are trying to compare team scores and tons scored by batsman in different eras..in 70-80s and 90s usually the wickets were prepared differently to suit both teams, the boundaries used to be bigger/ uniform with minor exceptions, the equipment and rules were different, and skill of players were unique to those conditions..so if someone says that Kohli would be able to overtake Sachin's records of ODI tons, then they are not comparing the conditions and restrictions in which they were scored to be able to rate them. You cannot equate a Sachin's ton in 1992 at MCG with a Kohli's ton in 2013 on subcontinent pitches where conditions/grounds/bowling are different. In any case, Sachin's ton at MCG with huge boundaries against a strong bowling attack should be rated higher. But an ODI ton is a ton and will add to records. Of course there is no way to discriminate. Hence experts should apply ratings based on conditions/opposition played rather than generalize.

  • on November 1, 2013, 5:29 GMT

    I respect MS as a fine cricket player and captain. However , his evaluation about the game seems to be senseless. Three very recent ODI matches, two of NZ Vs BD and the one of SA Vs PAK , are won by bowlers. Mr.MS has to blame either the Indian flat pitches not the cricketing rule as the same rule is applicable to every team. It is not the problem of the bowlers as well at a certain extend.

  • hkkishore on November 1, 2013, 5:09 GMT

    I don't think the new rules are the only cause for this. it's all bcoz of the pitch and weak bowling. Accept it. Arguably some good batting also.

    Even PAK vs SA and BAN vs NZ are played with the same rules and they're struggling to score 200 - 250.

  • on November 1, 2013, 4:17 GMT

    What next? Allow only full tosses to be bowled by bowlers? The rule changes, without any trial to back it up, makes no sense.

  • Des_65 on November 1, 2013, 4:03 GMT

    Rules are not good for current pitches and ground sizes in this series. If grounds are bigger and pitches give assistance to bowlers, it will still be hard to score more than 15 runs e.g. Kapil Dev hit two sixes and then got out in 1987 semi-final against England at Mumbai. He wanted to hit one more in the same over.

  • Des_65 on November 1, 2013, 3:58 GMT

    The new rules will make DL method inappropriate as the study was conducted with old rules and matches. The new rule will most probably affect matches played on flat pitches. Did it affect other matches e.g. Champions Trophy? Did it affect other matches played outside India? What happened to match in Sharjah? We cannot assess effect of new rules with matches played in India in the current series alone. It will be a biased assessment.

  • on November 1, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    This is bit ridicuous. Make bowling friendly pitches (not this type flat pitches), then, you wouldnt see teams chasing 350 (even 250 runs with ease). its not bowlers weakness, Australian bowlers are much better (than how the results in this series suggests), but these are extremely flat pitches. Blame the indian curators for making this ridiculous flat pitches, not the ICC rules.

  • on November 1, 2013, 2:09 GMT

    I agree re the bowling machine part, and the ridiculousness of ODI scores. Have felt this way for a long time. There is nothing for bowlers in 20/20s and ODIs and the crowd are only there to see 6s and 4s (not that there is any real cricket being played anyway), so just set up a bowling machine and let the batsmen tee off. Less chance of an injury to a bowler that you need for real cricket (ie Tests), and the crowd get their fair share of 6s and 4s. Everyone is happy.

  • on November 1, 2013, 2:07 GMT

    @Harmony111 the 65 meter rule only applies to new grounds. Any grounds that were there before the rule was bought in still have smaller boundaries. For example I saw at least 10 sixes that measured 56-60 meters in the last IPL. The smallest grounds in the world are in New Zealand where boundaries in some cases are 51 meters.

  • somethingdifferent on November 1, 2013, 1:17 GMT

    I completely disagree with Dhoni. These rules are being applied all over the world and no other team is having such problems or at least no one is vocal about it. In fact a lot of matches being played are still low scoring contests. Actually both Australian and Indian bowling attacks are so mediocre that they are taken to the cleaners on flat batting pitches by each others.

  • NZCricketfan1 on November 1, 2013, 0:16 GMT

    Call me old school but I find these games boring. They are to orientated to the batting team. Some wonderful batting for sure but I think T20 is the batting only game. For those who want it.

    I would like to see more in it for the bowlers so that a score of 300 is a superb effort not the norm. Cricket is a multi discipline game and focusing it only on 1 will actually reduce its appeal from a marketing perspective in the long term.

  • on November 1, 2013, 0:16 GMT

    Hello all you all are misguided with scores being chased. did we chased 302 which aussies made. no. because our opening batsmen did not click. only time we chase 350 is when opening was best and you know Kohli is inform batsmen. apart from 3 batsmen apart what about others in both teams? Also India bowlers do not have Yorkers or change . if they change, they even lose line and length. we need Aaron, Khan who has variety and change in pace. the reason we won matches is our openers and Virat for sure. Remember Virat and Dhawan when set make runs with aggressively than others. One of only test match Dhawan played with Aus, we lost one day, but still won because of the way innings was aced by Dhawan.

  • SriRudd on October 31, 2013, 23:27 GMT

    Well, the question has to be asked if the same issue is valid in other cricket playing nations and grounds around the world. The bleeding obvious is NO. So the ICC can either change the rules to suit India, like most other changes, and force cricket fans around the globe to turn to another sport (that is protected from Indianisation) or we can at least enjoy some good contests between other nations, at least for now.

  • Ducky610 on October 31, 2013, 23:25 GMT

    The most frustrating part for me... Is watching these run-fests and seeing mishit and terribly timed shots sailing over the fence for 6 or clearing the edge of the inner circle for a one bounce 4.... Between shorten bounderies, flat pitches, bats as thicker than small trees and unreasonable fielding restrictions; what is the point of even picking quality bowlers over a guy who can kind of bowl but can slog a quick 30 aswell?

  • GrindAR on October 31, 2013, 22:53 GMT

    Not far away for 500 run innings in a 50ov ODI.

  • Harmony111 on October 31, 2013, 21:14 GMT

    A myth is getting popular here that Indian grounds are tiny. Some ppl casually say that Indian grounds have 50 yard boundaries, some say they have 60 yards boundaries blah blah.

    As per the laws, the boundaries of a cricket ground should be between 65 yard to 90 yards. Note this means ALL possible boundaries from the square to the straight.

    In the 6th Ind-Aus ODI, @Over 27.1 & Over 28.4 Rohit hit two 6s over long on & deep mid wicket that were 81 metres long that landed around a metre behind the boundary ropes. Anyone can verify this in the footage available online.

    Thus, the straight & deeper boundaries were approx 80 metres i.e. 87 yards i.e. almost as much as the law permits.

    For comparison, MCG, the biggest stadium in the world, has dimensions of 174x148. The rope is 5 metres inside the fence so play-field dimensions are approx 164x138.

    This means MCG's straight boundaries are approx 82 metres.

    Nagpur is 80 meters, is called tiny.

    MCG is 82 meters, is called huge.

  • Mohammad_Aziz on October 31, 2013, 20:58 GMT

    Flat pitch is the main culprit here not the rules. In the same/next day there were 2 others games were played around the globe where a score of 187 and a score of 265 were defended successfully. After the rule change how many times India score more than 300 overseas? Or how many post 350(or even 300) score has been scored by any team since the rule change? Modern day batting has evolved and now with relatively batting more helpful pitches(around the globe) the score is higher than the like of 1990's. However, the fact is that bowlers look completely helpless in India is because of the road they make. In fact, in seaming condition India run the risk of loose its top order cheaply because of 2 new ball from both sides. But then again, BCCI may have enough power to force others to make roads in their own backyard as well(after what I see happened to SA/Lorgat).

  • sysubrceq0 on October 31, 2013, 20:49 GMT

    All - Who blames on Indian pitches, look how Indian pitches behaved in the past? In early 90's - the norm is 200-225 score is good score where batsmen still learning how to use the first 15 over field restrictions. In the middle overs Spinners take control on the match and restrict the batting side to par total 200+. from mid 90's batsmen learned to be aggressive in first 15 overs and by end of 15 overs the score are like 70 - 100 on average and from then spinners take control and batsmen build the innings and take the total to 250+. From 2000 on-wards changes in rules new power play rules made on par total of 300 from 250+ but still spinners contained the runs in middle overs. Then again rule changes with 2 new balls and only 4 fields outside, free-hits,... Spinners cannot control the batsmen as the ball will not spin much and also mishits lands safely as there is only 4 fielders. Blaming the pitches will not help completely in this case. Dhoni is right w.r.t. Indian conditions.

  • sysubrceq0 on October 31, 2013, 20:35 GMT

    @Unmesh_cric - in which part of Asia ball swings for long time to use two new balls? Those rules are made for ENG, ZN,SA and AUS to wreck Asian teams with two new balls in tandem. In Asia, two new balls will not swing and come on the bat very nicely and also balls will not become old so there will be no Spin and the result is disaster as we see in current series. Only 4 fielders inside the circle? absolute ridiculous - mishits can land safely and more runs. All the batsmen need to do is slog it and hard.

  • Harmony111 on October 31, 2013, 20:32 GMT

    A myth is getting popular here that Indian grounds are tiny. Some ppl casually say that Indian grounds have 50 yard boundaries, some say they have 60 yards boundaries blah blah.

    As per the laws, the boundaries of a cricket ground should be between 65 yard to 90 yards. Note this means ALL possible boundaries from the square to the straight.

    In the 6th Ind-Aus ODI, @Over 27.1 & Over 28.4 Rohit hit two 6s over long on & deep mid wicket that were 81 metres long that landed around a metre behind the boundary ropes. Anyone can verify this in the footage available online.

    Thus, the straight & deeper boundaries were approx 80 metres i.e. 87 yards i.e. almost as much as the law permits.

    For comparison, MCG, the biggest ground in the world, has dimensions of 174x148. The rope is 5 metres inside the fence so play-field dimensions are approx 164x138.

    This means MCG's straight boundaries are approx 82 metres

    Nagpur is 80 meters, is called tiny. MCG is 82 meters, is called huge.

  • praveenk89 on October 31, 2013, 20:32 GMT

    Part of game. Some teams win becoz they 've great bowling departments and some win for 'ving other areas good. Had not been our weak bowling department Dhoni would 've never speak of the grusome rules. Its fair to help & suggest our bowlers to be precise rather than depend solely on batting and pray for chase. As far as i know dhoni done good with the team and our batting line up rarely dissappoints in chases and only a team like South Africa fails to win with all it's mighty good departments of all areas.

  • mahi678 on October 31, 2013, 18:47 GMT

    ha ha i think no fielding restriction needed. how can it be icc made rule like.... batsman shouldn't go oveer 8 runs per over!!!!!!! cricket is players game not of for one who sit in AC room and make decisions. by the way bcci dosnt know how to nurture bowlers and indian captains doesn't know how to use bowling resources and make right fieldd settings. but amid these things i lik the way india chasing big targets.

  • on October 31, 2013, 18:15 GMT

    Well I agree partly with Dhoni and majority I dont.Basically it is not just the rules which are a reason for 350+ plus being scored.It is basically all about the pitches.Indian tracks have either been rank turners or dead rubber where batsmen make merry.If I am not wrong this rule of 4 fielders outside the circle is almost 1 year old how many 350+ scores were made or chased not even many 300's.So squarely blame it on Indian pitches and short boundaries for this run fest rather than the rules.Cricket is evolving game batsmen innovate even the bowlers need to do same slower deliveries slow ball bouncer are all innovations.Spinners being taken to cleaners still Ajmal Sunil Naraine and few others manage to stem flow its more about improvising and innovating rather than blaming somebody

  • Nampally on October 31, 2013, 18:14 GMT

    @Sir-Ivor: Your suggestion of sporting wickets is a good one if India can prepare those. The Lahli wicket example that you quoted is a recently laid pitch prepared on a regraded waste land. I presume the other pitches have been laid quite a way back. In India it is difficult to grow grass on turf pitches & maintain that grass. If they can leave about 1/4 to 1/2" grass laid on suitable clay foundation, it may provide a pitch that helps the bowlers. Mr. S.Vaidyanathan in his Cricinfo blog suggested 8 different ways of making the ODI more evenly poised for batsmen & bowlers. I had made a comment there to have identical rules in ODI's to those in Tests- with exceptions: it is confined to 50 overs with 5 bowlers allowed 10 overs each + 30 M limit be used for 3 power plays only + no other field restrictions+ use a single Kookaboro Red Ball for 50 overs + No ball rules same as for Tests. This will make a more even Bat vs. Ball battle. Sporting wkt. will further even out the unequal odds!.

  • Harmony111 on October 31, 2013, 18:14 GMT

    @hnlns:

    Quite misplaced if you are going to compare the era of 1970s & 80s to the era of 2010s. Even 90s can't be compared to the modern times. Modern day batsmen understand the art of batting in a much deeper way than the batsmen of the past. This is part of the evolution. ICC has to be blamed for a few stupid changes in the rules but these high scoring matches are not merely due to new laws or flat pitches, batting has improved a great deal in the last 20 yrs.

    FYI, the Nagpur stadium where this match was played has 80 metre boundaries. That is ~87 yards, not small by any means.

    Are you now going to say that 90 yards is large but 87 yards is small?

    A total of 225 used to be quite competitive as late as 1992. It all changed after Greatbatch, Sachin & later Sanath Jaysuriya started to change the approach to batting and brought in the concept of the aggressive, fearless opener who wanted to score quick runs while the ball was new and the field was up.

  • binojpeter on October 31, 2013, 17:59 GMT

    Many of those who comment here does not understand what Dhoni is saying and jumps into conclusion that high scores are due to pitches being roads. Actually pitches are prepared for 270-280 scores on average. But what Dhoni is saying is that with the current field restrictions, batsmen if they are innovative enough can take the score easily to 350 and bowlers cannot do much about it. I don't think that lot of spectators would want to watch a match where a team batting first getting bowled out for 120s or 130s and team batting second struggling to reach that score.

  • Tornado1 on October 31, 2013, 17:42 GMT

    Something to do with the Indian Pitches as well. Where else on earth 300-350 is a norm in ODI's? Where are the most 150's and even double centuries scored? I wish BCCI think about improving the quality of pitches as well. Whatever you call this series, this isn't cricket. I know soon there will be a 300 in a T20 inside India.

  • coldcoffee123 on October 31, 2013, 17:13 GMT

    @Biswajit Debnath . You are dead right. Cricket has now become Baseball. The pitch is no longer (at least in ODIs) a factor. The pitch used to be the heart of cricket. My backyard cricket games have more drama, twists and challenging conditions for the batsmen compared to international cricket. Every below average batsmen is now turning into a goliath with only 4 fielders outside ring. It is a shame that posters here have more knowledge and foresight than ICC lawmakers. Now I can realize how good a batsman Bradman must have been, with no such bowling curbs. It is a shame that there are any field restrictions at all. I mean, to say that there cannot be more than 4 outside ring sounds more like a doctrine/diktat rather than a cricketing rule. Absolutely senseless. Why is ICC so afraid of the fielders standing wherever they want on the ground !!!

  • hnlns on October 31, 2013, 17:11 GMT

    I remember seeing matches in MCG of late 1970s and early 80s where the boundaries used to be 90 yards and 50-over ODI scores used to be 250 at best with 225 being more or less the average, which shows the boundaries ought to be 75-80 yards all round at least and pitches need to have bounce at least tummy height if not chest height, then we can see how many 350s will be scored and chased.

  • Shrescs on October 31, 2013, 16:37 GMT

    SA and PAK are also playing with the same 'NEW' rules, correct? They are not piling up 350's. One of them could not even chase 185! :) Its not just the 'New Rules', that is spoiling the game, here I think.

  • on October 31, 2013, 16:29 GMT

    All bowling restrictions should be abandoned, forthwith. So is the case with excessively strict legside wides, and some of the "hair splitting type" foot-faults.

    We also need a rule for the minimum distance to the ropes. '60-65 odd' is ridiculous. Even the most atrocious mishits goes for a sixer; can you imagine? Is it really a test of cricketing skills?

  • ProdigyA on October 31, 2013, 16:25 GMT

    1. Restriction on how long the boundaries should be. Minimum 80 meters at any part of the ground. 2. Get off with the ridiculous field restrictions.

    I think these two would do. Two new balls is ok cause it's better for the fast bowlers.

  • on October 31, 2013, 16:20 GMT

    Yes; 9 batsmen, 1 WK-batsman, & a bowling machine! That should be India team! All "human bowlers" may be asked to and helped in changing their profession.

  • SarfBD on October 31, 2013, 16:19 GMT

    100% agree with Dhoni. Captains from other teams and bowlers should support him and make a statement to ICC. It seems ICC also wants to 'play' and as they are not capable of fielding a team, they are playing with rules.

  • on October 31, 2013, 16:09 GMT

    This is not cricket at all....rather it's BASEBALL where you smash the ball all over without discrimination....

  • CandidIndian on October 31, 2013, 15:42 GMT

    As usual haters will oppose and write off any suggestion made by Indian side especially Dhoni without giving much thought to it but the fact is that these new rules are against teams from subcontinent in the long run. Flat pitches or not, two new balls and extra fielder inside will negate the effect of spinners. Indian pitches are always flat (not something about which we can be proud of though) but had something in it for the spinners, since that advantage is gone due to new rules we are witnessing scores in excess of 300 regularly. 60 m boundaries are hardly beneficial for home side as its the same for both teams, in fact if Indian bowling is extremely weak to deserve scurrilous comments then going by that logic 60 m boundaries should be more beneficial for touring team. Anyways its time of make more sporting pitches, that would be more logical instead of changing the new rules which are unanimously accepted by all teams. Cheers.

  • Masking_Tape on October 31, 2013, 15:34 GMT

    Make the grounds bigger. Simple. Stop bringing in the ropes and make it easy for the batsmen to hit. The batsmen and bats are getting bigger by the day. Why not make the boundaries bigger too.

  • India-Do-Well on October 31, 2013, 15:34 GMT

    People are complaining about averages, records being broken etc and this is exactly the reason you cannot compare players from different era's. This is the perfect example. Finally if the records are being broken and new ones being set so what? It will not make Tendulkar / Lara / Kallis any less great. Players come and go, records keep getting broken and life goes on. All that remains are the pleasure of watching your favorite play and remembering them, which is what I will do with my memories of Tendulkar no matter what he does in the next two tests.

  • on October 31, 2013, 15:25 GMT

    In future going on with these rules we will: 1.We will see only batsmen in ODI cricket. 2.We will see only batsmen forming the 11 players team. 3.They will only do all the 50 overs bowling. 4.We will see new rules like "NO FIELDERS WILL BE THERE OUTSIDE 30 yard circle and if ball spin/swings the ball will be changed. 5.Scores like 600 will be common. 6.then ICC will count 300s instead of 100s hit by the batsmen.

    Cricket has always been a batsmen's game.It's time now for ICC to change...

  • on October 31, 2013, 14:56 GMT

    Dhoni makes a lot of sense and voices a real concern which I am surprised not too many other captains speak about - at least not when their winning. I understand the need to make the make more interesting, and fours and sixes seem to be the way to go given the success of T20. However at what cost? Through sacrificing bowlers by burning them at the stake?

    I am sure the bowlers will hit back and improve their abilities and we will see improved performances. Pitches will make a difference, but I also see the battle continuing to be unequal. The current rule on an extra fielder in the ring will always ensure that the balance is kept towards the batsmen.

    If the game was one of bat and ball - the rules must allow it to always be a battle of equals and not tilt the balance unfairly in favor of the batsmen. After all - no one likes a one horse winner right?

  • mukesh_LOVE.cricket on October 31, 2013, 14:43 GMT

    odi rules should be changed , why don't anyone think of implementing what Shane warne once said ! his idea of removing all fielding restriction and giving the captains full freedom in setting them is simple and genius , also captains should be allowed to choose whether to bowl with old ball or new one.. that way the best captains and most skilled bowlers will be able to make use of the conditions in the best possible manner and there will be no more scope for complaints as you can use 2 new balls in England , SA ,Aus and 1 new and 1 old ball in India , SL etc..

  • test_cricket_lover on October 31, 2013, 14:19 GMT

    Aravinda de Silva, my favorite ODI batsman for his ability to take away any bowling apart when in mood, averages 35. I couldn't imagine Virat Kohli having any of the batting qualities 'greater' than de Silva. Yet, he averages above 50. This average also suggests Kohli is better than Sachin, Inzamam and even Vivian Richards.

  • venky_cricky on October 31, 2013, 14:18 GMT

    ppl criticizing indian bowlers think again.Even the australian bowlers were hammered.With these batting favoured rules the kohlis, Baileys will easily go past sachin's odi records.But the young generation bowlers not even acheive the record of some one like Ajit agarkar

  • on October 31, 2013, 14:15 GMT

    I think its too early to give a verdict on the new rules. As a spectator, i dont think anybody's complaining. Not long ago ppl were writing obituaries abt 50 over cricket. Now after champions trophy & this series when 50 over cricket is up & running, suddenly the skipper & bowlers r complaining. it they have 5 fielders inside, they also have got an extra new ball. i think bowlers will find a way out. What say ?

  • Sir_Ivor on October 31, 2013, 14:15 GMT

    Frankly speaking, it may not be the new rules that is making the ODI s so horribly favourable to the batsman in India but the wickets that are used. Let us have game in Lahli and we will have a low scoring interesting game that is a true contest of skills. The SA Pak match will show that a good sporting wicket is at the heart of making ODIs really worth watching. Rather than lament about the new rules, I wish Dhoni would ask for good sporting wickets for all ODIs and Tests. If he could go so much overboard over wicket preparation against England in the last series and make himself a laughing stock, I am sure he can express the need to have sporting pitches. The BCCI would then provide these type of wickets and Indian wickets will be nice testing grounds like what they have at Perth, Headingly,Melbourne and Kingsmead. Just because India has won does not mean that Dhoni can remain complacent. Sporting wickets are the need of the hour both for domestic and international games in India.

  • on October 31, 2013, 14:01 GMT

    I agree that new rules are mostly in batsmen favor. But Indian batsmen definitely deserve an applause as chasing 350 is no easy task irrespective of the conditions. Just to look positively at the rule, it allows 2 bouncers for bowlers and secondly five fielder inside also means attacking fields. So, if bowlers have quality than they should try to use it to their advantage. Just look at the Pak vs SA match which was going on simultaneously with India's match. 180 could not be chased down and chasing team bated for almost 50 overs ( of course conditions were different, but quality of bowling was also different. Just tell me how many yorkers have been executed correctly b bowlers in this series.

  • coldcoffee123 on October 31, 2013, 13:58 GMT

    @ Nampally: "Ashwin, Ishant & Vinay Kumar are 3 guys who are the worst culprits, leaking over 7 runs/over." You got to be kidding. With 4 outside circle, you can easily hit 2 boundaries per over. Think about it. An over has 6 balls. A batsman can choose which balls to hit. Bowling 6 good balls right on target is not a piece of cake. With 4 outside circle, 7 rpo is gold. By the way, if reverse/switch hits get banned, and all fielding restrictions eliminated (Warne's idea), the batting teams would struggle to cross 225. That is how it used to be in the 90s with all teams. 225+ was a challenge to chase down. With 4 outside circle, the par score is 325 which is 100 more than 225. Nowadays, batsmen are able to score 2 extra runs per over, making it 100 extra runs in 50 overs. It is not that the current batsmen are any better or the bowlers any worse than the earlier generations, it is the unsporting field restrictions and reverse/switch hits that have tilted the balance in Batsman's favor.

  • on October 31, 2013, 13:56 GMT

    Agree with Dhoni. But new rules making the game ridiculous. Its completely bating game bowlers has to find a new way to bowl probably they have to bowl directly to helmett lol!!!!!!!!!

  • A-Gunnie on October 31, 2013, 13:26 GMT

    Too many changes to the game in a short period of time.It hard to keep up with them!! Some of them indeed are not being fully thought through and are implemented I must say.On a quick glance,they are in benefit of batting as the law makers figures it's the offence that sells not deffence.

  • Nampally on October 31, 2013, 13:25 GMT

    I do not endorse Dhoni constantly moaning about the "New Rules". The same rules apply to all the Teams. Trick is to adapt to the new rules by XI selection + using Bowlers bowling to their field. Dhoni's XI selection is often irrational & more on "gut feeling". Stats do not lie. Ashwin, Ishant & Vinay Kumar are 3 guys who are the worst culprits, leaking over 7 runs/over. If a bowler cannot bowl to his field drop him. India has a dozen seamers who can perform better than Ishant & Vinay. Secondly using medium pace bowling all rounders is a better choice than having both Yuvraj & Jadeja in XI. A.Nayar will fit the bill well. Thirdly for heaven sake do not use Kohli as a bowler. He is a superb batsman but NOT a Bowler+ he might be lost due to unnecessary injury while bowling! With Dhawan, Rohit, Kohli @ top 3 + Dhoni as Finisher, India has the best batting line up in the world. Only bowlers need to be planned & selected carefully - 3 Seamers + I RH Off spin + 1 LH orthodox- as a Minimum.

  • AltafPatel on October 31, 2013, 13:25 GMT

    Indian pitch curators should learn from curator of Abu Dhabi/Dubai.

  • digvijaynlu on October 31, 2013, 13:17 GMT

    Australia has hit 47 sixes, their most in a tournament and next only to 2007 world cup. I wonder what an extra fielder outside the 30 yard circle would have done about it. Moreover as already said above other teams are also playing with same rules and this is not the scenario. So we need to analyse the situation keeping all such things in mind then pass any judgment on new rules.

  • on October 31, 2013, 13:15 GMT

    It is mighty ironic that the top 2 ODI teams in the rankings have the two of the most expensive bowling attacks amongst all the teams in the rankings! We can at least have a heavier outfield if not a competitive pitch to make scoring a little difficult for the batsmen.

  • on October 31, 2013, 13:11 GMT

    If the bowlers have to bowl with only 4 fielders outside the circle then there should be also rules regarding the size and weight of bats. Batsman are able to clear the boundaries using their heavy bats even with a mishit. If ICC doesn't want to make bowlers an endangered species in cricket then they have to bring back the new rules or balance the contest between bat and ball

  • on October 31, 2013, 13:10 GMT

    Basically the ODI cricket needed to evolve. If the rules never get changed and nine fielders are posted on the boundary before the penultimate ball in a 2013 match, it will take the spice of the game away. Back in 2005, the ICC started to use the 12 players a side method which gave a better balance to the team. It was soon met with severe criticism and dissolved. With the introduction of two white balls from the both sides and four fielders outside the 30 yard circle, it will be upto the bowlers to learn and adapt quickly. Cricket is a great game for it undergoes evolution with the revolutionary players and strategies. This new rule would change at some point of time to accommodate a more challenging aspect, perhaps to the batsmen. With a change in the rules regarding the decrement bat's size and weight and if the white balls are allowed to be heavier, the game will shift to the bowler's side. Cricket is a great game. The contest between the bat and the ball is simply relentless.....

  • on October 31, 2013, 13:04 GMT

    If someone has problem with the new rules then making pitches like these should also be ban in cricket.

  • whereis.mykake on October 31, 2013, 12:46 GMT

    With the same *New Rules* PAK-SA match on the same day went on wire for 190 odd runs. It is about Pitch and quality of bowlers. I bet on the same Nagpur Pitch, Pak bowlers will not let India cross 300 runs. Pak Batsmen will not make anything more than 200 (even with Ishant) but that is different story...

  • pull_shot on October 31, 2013, 12:42 GMT

    Give the liberty to captain after 25 overs to continue with 2 balls or with one ball which can reverse in d end but with new spinners r joke i think these rules were introduce to suppress asian teams 2 bouncers,2 new ball, 4 fielders see spinners bowling with deep square leg or mid off up these batsman with heavy bats just slog for a six and remaining dots this takes away d art of playing spin immediately d rule should be change 5 fielders out side circle and ban reverse bat shots

  • keptalittlelow on October 31, 2013, 12:38 GMT

    I think Dhoni has a point here, his batting side is the best in the world at the moment which has proved to gun down any target and yet he is worried about the long term damage to the game, I commend him.

  • suresh66 on October 31, 2013, 12:28 GMT

    i do belive with Dhoni about his feeling for any bowlers bowling in those flat beds in India. Hope there will be a time when the other cricketing nations will not send there main strike bowlers to india any more, because this will create a phisiological shok therapy and low on confidence for them to bowl agin. If we have to create quality fast bowlers and spinners, we have to change the nature of our piches, else as our national captains suggest, only required some bowling machines and batsman to play one day and 20-20 format of cricket in India. This is totaly unfair what BCCI doing now to fill the seats in our stadiums. There should be fair chance for the bowlers to bowl else cricket will loose its cham for ever.

  • TommytuckerSaffa on October 31, 2013, 12:26 GMT

    Rules are not the problem. Its Groundsmen preparing absolute Roads - under orders - for these ODIs. They are also told to bring the ropes in for more boundries.

    I do think that the 1 ball rule should come back in to promote the skill of reverse swing. Posters are complaining that bowlers are not bowling enought yorkers. The issue is that now bats are so heavy, a slightly misguided yorker goes for 4 runs.

  • Srini_Indian on October 31, 2013, 12:21 GMT

    @landl47: When was the last time you saw in India with such high scores like the current one? ODI pitches in India is always a batting pitch just like everywhere else in the world. The only assistance for the bowlers would be little bit of swing in earlier overs and little bit of spin later on. With the current stupid rule of 2 new balls, spinners can't spin the ball. That's why you see these high scores. If the ball is old enough to spin, this series would have 4-0 to India as opposed to 2-2.

  • Zahidsaltin on October 31, 2013, 12:13 GMT

    Why talk about the impact of new rules only. Why not look at the highway styled wickets which India is producing. Why are there not being scored so many runs at other venues?

  • heathrf1974 on October 31, 2013, 12:11 GMT

    That's what I was thinking Dhoni.

  • landl47 on October 31, 2013, 12:01 GMT

    It's not the rules so much as the pitches and short boundaries. Provide pitches with pace, bounce and turn and put the boundaries back to where they should be and the games will be much more interesting.

    @200ondebut: no, 'fans' want to see a proper contest between bat and ball. It's people who know nothing about the game who want to see a parade of 4s and 6s. That's why they like T20- you don't have to understand anything about cricket to watch a batsman slog the ball over and over again.

    True fans are already bored with these runfests. It will take casual viewers a bit longer, but they'll get there.

  • on October 31, 2013, 11:57 GMT

    I agree to any extend to Dhoni. It is a bit harsh on bowlers and the game should provide equal opportunities for both bowlers and batsmen. Having said that supporting bowlers like Ishanth Sharma will not do any good for Indian Cricket. India would have won the series already if he would have bowled at least 2 or 3 good balls in that 30 runs over. Every ball in that over is a short pitched ball and he was bowling to the batsman's strength. Never there was a moment where i felt he is an international bowler. He should be playing only test matches but again we have much better bowlers than him...

  • omprakash885 on October 31, 2013, 11:53 GMT

    I think a bowling powerplay of 5 overs should be re-introduced, but with a different strategy. Ay present during non powerplay overs, 4 players are allowed outside the circle and, during batting powerplay only 3 players are allowed. Now a bowling powerplay should be there to equate the batting powerplay. This cab done by giving 1 extra player outside the cirle, i.e. during bowling powerplay 5 players should be allowed outside the circle. In my opinion, this will almost equate the batting powerplay, and will be benefited for fielding side

  • bobbo2 on October 31, 2013, 11:45 GMT

    Watching batsman smash bowlers on roads is boring

  • Dynamodev on October 31, 2013, 11:43 GMT

    I think the rule is brilliant. It forces teams to be more attacking and aggressive in field placings. Before, between 15-35 overs, the game would be so dull with batsmen only looking for singles. Now, singles are harder to come by which result in either wickets or boundaries. Dhoni is hiding the fact that the current Indian bowling line-up is actually very poor. Low scores are still defendable - you just need to be tactically astute and have bowlers that bowl to their fields.

  • ravi0509 on October 31, 2013, 11:39 GMT

    I think those who are not aware about Indian Conditions here some info which may help you understanding.

    1. This is the beginning of the cricket Season in India..Thats why wickets will be fresh and high scoring games. 2. India vs Pak..2012-13 ODI series Highest score was 250 In 3 ODI series. 3. India Vs England..2013 ODi series teams scored 300+ only in the 1st match

    As more and matches goes on wickets will become slow..But these 2 new rules need to go..India and Pakistan bowlers do reverse swing with old ball..Zak,Wasim,Waqar are experts in it..Now they taking away that because of ball change..Spinners will be more effective when ball is old and when they create pressure..Now its difficult with only 4 fielders.

    All those are saying Pak vs SA is a great advertisment...In that case India Vs Pak 3rd ODI India defended 165 runs on Indian pitch..Which is a classic in that case..

    Pakistan spineless batting made both the matches classic...Only way out is ICC need to go back to old rules

  • on October 31, 2013, 11:37 GMT

    Its always easy to grumble against a new rule. However our current Indian pitches (for ODIs) which are neither spin or seam bowler make the rule one-sided. Add to that the boundaries which are on the shorter side. Yesterday, South Africa successfully defended a tiny total with the same set of rules! The current crop of bowlers(both Indian and Australian are not bad) but have been made to chase the leather continously. Sachin's final Ranji match had a great pitch which he acknowledged. Such pitches will even out the playing field. Its time we stopped crying foul and make do with the available resources and bring back some dignity to our bowlers who are on the verge of a burnout!

  • on October 31, 2013, 11:34 GMT

    Indian flat pitches slaughterhouse for Bowlers. the new rules of only four men in the outfield during power-plays is a bane for bowlers and especially Spin bowlers, it makes them hesitant to toss the bowl up and bowl defensive lines. No surprises as to why Amit mishra went for so many runs.

  • willsrustynuts on October 31, 2013, 11:32 GMT

    What a joke. ODI's are too formulaic so you change the formula and it gets worse. So you change things again and again until the game is so contrived that you are better off using a)DL or b) deciding the game on the toss.

    As far as I can see it is the Asian countries that love ODI's so much but yet the grounds are not full and the captain of the team benefiting most is the first to complain!!! Good luck and good riddance.

  • on October 31, 2013, 11:23 GMT

    about the rule changes. sack the icc, good for nothing

  • maddy20 on October 31, 2013, 11:23 GMT

    I agree with him. Hayden spoke of another point that I found to be pretty sensible as well. He said that the run scoring in the middle overs was hard due to the ball going soft after say 25 overs and it becomes harder to time the ball. Now with the new rule, both balls would be hard and it makes hitting a lot easier. Add to that spinners problems with the two new balls and lack of reverse swing , the batsmen are having it way too easy. ICC needs to revoke these two rules as soon as possible. Even in the recently concluded ODI series in England Aus scored 300+ in two of the three games. It sets a dangerous precedent. No one would want to be a bowler anymore.

  • CricketFanIndUS on October 31, 2013, 11:22 GMT

    7 hours of 4s and 6s is not good in the long run, once or twice a year it is good to see a match like that, but not more than that. Why did they change the rules of the game is such a huge way to begin with? The field restriction rule change is just bad. Does it not take away the consistency of the statistics and change the game too much? For the subcontinent pitches (especially early in the cricket season), the pitches are flat and will need a reversing ball but that is harder with two new balls. It affects our relatively weaker bowling further and ordinary batting lineups will look great against us. Like Dhoni says they might as well go with bowling machines and spare our bowlers. Injuries will also skyrocket, with the amount of cricket being played these days, if you add huge scores to get and defend, it is only logical. Add club cricket fielders and spare the team from injuries fielding.

  • Rajgarg on October 31, 2013, 11:18 GMT

    Some body should ask MSD why poor Jaydev Unadkat was dropped from the team. he bowled reasonably well on 3rd ODI and the balance of 6th ODI team was not there. He has chosen four spinners and Yiuvraj Singh never bowled and third seemer could have been very useful. The bowling balance was very much not there. Yuvraj Singh & Ashwin should be dropped from the last ODI and Ambati and Jaydev Unadkat should be given a chance.

  • Markdal on October 31, 2013, 11:17 GMT

    Interestingly, Geoff Lawson said exactly the same thing probably nearly 10 years ago, before T20 even. His beef then was with the wickets that were prepared for ODIs, but that is still a big part of what's going on now. I can recall some of the best one-day games were when a team was chasing only 100 or so on a less-than-perfect pitch. PLEASE, can we have some more of them?

  • CricketFever11 on October 31, 2013, 11:14 GMT

    What a joke LOL. Of course Bowling machine is better than this pedestrian Indian bowling attack. India are the world champions in 60m ground with flat tracks. Cricket in India is actually not cricket. It combination of Baseball and Golf.

  • AltafPatel on October 31, 2013, 11:13 GMT

    finally captain of world champion team realized the reason instead of blaming new rules. because same rules applied to SA-Pak low scoring match yesterday that was much deserving to watch rather than this high scoring with four and sixes.

  • NP_NY on October 31, 2013, 11:10 GMT

    @Green_and_Gold: Pak vs SA scores being less than 200 had nothing to do with the pitch, bowling quality, etc.. Both teams are full of batsmen who choke easily. Doesn't matter what pitch it is, losing 6 wickets for 17 runs is just pathetic batting. My club team would have scored more runs than SA or Pak on that pitch.

  • on October 31, 2013, 11:08 GMT

    These rules which have bee implemented by the ICC work for pitches in countries such as South Africa and England where the two new balls make it difficult for batsmen at the top of the innings and filed restrictions aid the bowlers throughout the innings. However on flatter conditions, like the ones found in India, the new rules only augment the number of runs scored rather than curtail them. if this is what the ICC wants so be it but I am sure that we as cricket watchers would prefer a nail-biting 270 chase where the bat and ball are equals rather than multiple 350+ chases where the ball is inferior to the bat throughout the innings.

  • 200ondebut on October 31, 2013, 11:08 GMT

    Memo to MSD - the fans - you know the ones that pay to come into the ground or pay to watch on TV - prefer to see plenty of action.

    However the key thing is that it is exciting - this means no one sided affairs played on poor wickets.

    the recent matches have been a great advert for the game - perhaps MSD is worried that 50 over cricket may overtake T20 and India's unhealthy financial stranglehold of the game may unravel as a result.

  • Herath-UK on October 31, 2013, 11:06 GMT

    Dhoni is quite right to cast his doubts & the ODI games will just be a mockery. Sri Lanka & Pak too will face this problem severely mostly depending on their spinners to deliver the goods.Will the ICC put a stop to this asap? Ranil Herath - Kent

  • on October 31, 2013, 10:53 GMT

    Sure if by changing these rules in 2012, they wanted to create a run fest for ODI's, they accomplished that. but what they will also accomplish is an increased interest in Test cricket as people who want to watch 'proper' cricket will make the switch. Sure its awesome to watch a few balls get whacked out of the park, but every game -_- gets boring pretty quickly. I still vaguely remember the days when 300 was a big accomplishment. Change the rules before cricket looses its character.

  • on October 31, 2013, 10:52 GMT

    Indian wickets are extremely batting friendly. This is not the case in Sri Lanka. In the long run Indian batsmen can have a better average.

  • on October 31, 2013, 10:51 GMT

    Effectively we are now having ALL POWER PLAY (extra fielder inside the 30 yds even in non power play). This plus two balls (one at each end) seriously harms spinners.

    So Amit Mishra's first 4 overs were really an inspired spell. He should be good to go in the test series.

    OK

  • on October 31, 2013, 10:51 GMT

    I agree in part with Dhoni. What he forgot to mention is that the groundskeepers are preparing batting paradises, quite intentionally so. Cricket is not just a batter's game - it should be a contest between bat and ball. If the Indian administrators want it to be all about batting, then they will lose a huge part of real cricket followers who appreciate the finer nuances of the game. While this may be more financially attractive, cricket will be the loser in the long run. I'm pleased that Dhoni has come out and said this, hopefully someone will listen.

  • wazza85 on October 31, 2013, 10:51 GMT

    this is so true you rather have a bowling machine than a bowler bowling. basically teams have to look for that accurate bowler who bowls all 6 balls wicket to wicket. this new rule should be scrapped.

  • GlobalCricketLover on October 31, 2013, 10:46 GMT

    I think the rules are also the issue besides the pitches. Those who argue for the yday match at Sharjah, if the hopeless lineup of SA and Pak can get to 180 on that pitch, imagine what a decent batting side would have achieved! I am an SA fan but you should look at their last 10 matches to see where their ODI line up stands in terms of batting. Pitches should be sportive - no debate about that, but having only 4 fielders in the 40-50 overs is a day light murder if you have good power hitters in the side who have the license to throw kitchen sink at every thing.

  • on October 31, 2013, 10:44 GMT

    Rather than thinking about new rules tell the pitch makers in India to create even pitches. Changing the rules consistently for a developing sport will ruin it's reputation. A cricket game should be competitive than enjoyable. A team should have the chance to bounce back in a game at any time and the bowling and batting conditions for both the side should remain same. India is the only place where you could get 7 batting easy pitches in a tournament which is not good the team and sport.

  • spinkingKK on October 31, 2013, 10:34 GMT

    The rules are brought in to get high scores in the ODI's and it has achieved it. Now, it is up to the bowlers to find new ways to curtail runs. If 500 becomes the new 350 of tomorrow, so be it. Only thing is, the old records can not be compared to the later ones. Centuries may be very easy to record in the future ODI's, because of the rules.

  • 512fm on October 31, 2013, 10:33 GMT

    Really glad that Dhoni has touched on this, and also that many Indian fans are fed up with these bat fests. As a bowler, its a complete joke watching these matches, they really may as well be played on concrete. What happened to cricket being an even contest between bat and ball?

  • asiacricket1234 on October 31, 2013, 10:30 GMT

    Other teams are not suffering that mush from this rule. Yesterday SA defend their 183 against Pakistan and thats just one example. The quality of Indian bowlers is pathetic. If you saw that match yesterday than you know how ordinary there bowling was. With bowling like that they will end up giving Associates more than 300 run in a match. The pitch was like an high road. India is known for making such pitches probably to ensure that their batsmen can score 100,s and make new records. What India need to consider is how they are going to improve the quality of their bowler and for god sake start making some sporting wickets.

  • Pak_Guru on October 31, 2013, 10:28 GMT

    Send Pakistani batsman to bat on Indian wickets. Probably the only team in the world which will struggle to reach 250, and if Misbah some how gets out early then even 220 will be a task.

  • Varun_R123 on October 31, 2013, 10:24 GMT

    The same rules existed in Champions Trophy, SA vs PAK series. We didnt see more 300+ scores in these tournaments. When you prepare flat, highways as pitches blame the groundstaff and the Board and not the rules.

    Poor explanation by Dhoni.

  • Yevghenny on October 31, 2013, 10:19 GMT

    bowlers should be allowed to bowl as many overs as they want. No more of these part timers trying to sneak in a couple of overs here and there

  • PanGlupek on October 31, 2013, 10:15 GMT

    Totally agree with MSD - Apart from doing things like taking spinners out of the game, it also belittles the records of some of the great performances of the last 20 years or so (as the featured comment rightly says).

    Pitches with nothing in it for bowlers don't help much either - an ODI with a side chasing 175 or 200 when a pitch is spinning, seaming, and watching batsmen work extra hard for their runs is equally enjoyable to watch, if not much more so, than a match where 350 per side is about par.

    If it keeps going like this, teams will start picking 9 or 10 batsmen every match & look to bat second every time.

  • Ralphy145 on October 31, 2013, 10:15 GMT

    Two average bowling attacks, a flat deck and some great batsmen... Dhoni is only complaining because his bowling attack is poor and he'd rather have a bowling machine do the job. At least then he'd have some line and length rather than full toss / lon hop.

  • jeyjk on October 31, 2013, 10:12 GMT

    One thing we are forgetting is due to this rule batsman are very easily getting their ton and surpasing the earlier records made by some good players in the world who scored those runs against some hard bouncing bowlers.

  • shan4065 on October 31, 2013, 10:10 GMT

    Even PAK VS SA match is being played with the same Rules then how come both teams struggled to reach 200.So its just not the Rules alone should be held reason for high scoring matches. Other factors like the Pitch, outfield and the quality of Bowlers and Batsmanship also plays significant Role.

  • Kedars_DT on October 31, 2013, 10:04 GMT

    How about creating seamer friendly pitches like the one in Lahli where Mumbai defeated Haryana ? Is MS open to this idea instead of blaming the change in rules ? He has always supported low and slow spinner friendly pitches and then when the bowlers get whacked by the opposition he blames the change in rules. Look at SA, Pakistan match yesterday. They played with the same set of rules, isn't it.

  • aneesst on October 31, 2013, 10:04 GMT

    Friends dont blindly shout against the new rules, these high scoring is happening only in matches india is playing it is bcoz we are having the worst bowlers so oppostion is scoring 300+ and we are having the best batsmen so that we are chasing it down. if we giv the same playing conditions to any other 2 teams this wont happen. see matches in bangladesh, SL etc where normal scoring happening.

    this is the clash between 1 and 2 rank team high scoring matches will normally happen with strong batting line up + poor indian bowling

  • on October 31, 2013, 10:01 GMT

    one day games should be balanced.for that, my ideas are,

    1. no more power plays.instead,5 fielders should be in side the circle all the time of the game, or if power play wants to apply,3 fielders should be out side the circle for 1st 25 overs or later 25 overs and 3 fielders in side of the circle on non power plays.

    2.if icc wants to keep the same fielding rule,let substitutes to bat and bowl when their captains need.like in foot ball.

  • A__J on October 31, 2013, 9:59 GMT

    I think the new rules are not the problem, a challenge should be welcomed. The indian pitches are flat and easy for batsmen to set up such run fests. The boundaries need to be pushed back, and the pitches should provide something for the bowlers.

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:53 GMT

    ODI's now are pretty much unwatchable. The contest between bat and ball, the primary element of cricket brought down to its simplest terms, has gone and it's going to take an awful lot to resurrect it. I doubt if the collective will is there. The saddest part of it all was seeing the Nagpur stadium packed to the rafters for this non-event. If that continues then the powers-that-be will see no reason to change things. The damage will be irreparable for a short-term fix of making a fast buck - who on earth will want to be a bowler from the younger generation when all you are is cannon-fodder? Ian Chappell was absolutely right in his recent article on here that it all gets monotonous to watch. I'm pleased to be in England where ODI's are treated in the main with complete indifference - I personally wouldn't be bothered to walk across the road with a free ticket to watch one, much like many others here....complete dross and garbage non-spectacles...

  • India2014 on October 31, 2013, 9:52 GMT

    Dhoni is right, this new rule reducing the interest in cricket. Bowlers quality with this new rule doesn't matter at all. Board please roll back this rule, for the sake of growing healthy cricket.

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:47 GMT

    The new 2 ball rules must stay. What we need to change in India is pitches which makes cricket interesting. I am not sure did any one watch Pak -SA match at Sharjah and it was great cricket match where in any one could have won. BCCI pitches committee must ensure better pitches which can keep both batsman and bowlers interested. Once in a while you may like to watch 300+ scores but if it becomes too repetitive, then ODI charm will wear-off. Hope BCCI wakes up to this fact and recognize their fault and rectify. We want uniform fight between bat and ball!!! Please WAKE UP BCCI!!!!

  • Green_and_Gold on October 31, 2013, 9:44 GMT

    How did the pitch play? SA v PAK ended without 200 being reached - both sides bowled out inside 50 overs. I suspenct that its flat pitches that will play a bigger imact on big scores. Sure the rules are in fav of the batsman however if the ball isnt moving off the pitch or the ball is coming onto the bat nicely then what do you expect.

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:39 GMT

    one of the worst ODI series for real cricket fan u will ever see..!! where 350 score is no enough, one of strongest bowling line up is not enough to win but with blunt paceless bowling and 3 spinners u can win with strong batting line up..!! is there any cricket can u see in modern era? now ODI = test match of 20 20..!! i think one day india will have 11 batsmen and they will chase down 1800 in 50 overs. who d hell makes new ODI rules?

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:33 GMT

    ERR,batsmen are complaining that the ODI format has become too easy....WAKE UP ADMINISTRATORS! Which neutral fan can claim that this India/Aussie match was better than the S.A/Pak match which produced around half the number of run? The best ODI pitches woud be those where 250 is a good score.People want to see CLOSER CONTESTS and NOT BATFESTS....Im all for innovation and the game moving forward with the 20 over format bringing new dimensions to batsmanship but im totally against the game becoming sterile as is now happening.

  • jb633 on October 31, 2013, 9:28 GMT

    I personally think captains should be allowed to choose whether or not they want to use the 2 new balls. In the SC it is more of a hinderance than a help because the balls are no longer reversing or gripping as much for the spinners. We could have a situation where in ENG/ SA/ AUS/ NZ sides will go in with 2 new balls but in Asia they choose just one.

  • Cyril_Knight on October 31, 2013, 9:27 GMT

    A most attractive quality of all cricket is its unpredictability, this ODI series has been so predictable; massive scores, big hit after big hit, awful bowling from demoralised quicks, knowing even a huge score will be chased down with ease. Therefore, even I turned over yesterday mid-chase to watch Neighbours, confident I would miss nothing but a few boundaries.

    I would note that it only this series, so far, since the rule changes that is like this. The Champions Trophy was incredibly entertaining because the bowlers were given pitches with some live; early swing and then lots of turn. It is the pitches in India that are gifting runs and wearing out bowlers, they are just not fair.

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:26 GMT

    Limited over cricket is now even more boring. The game is about batting AND bowling. As usual those that run cricket, have got it wrong. Cricket is not just about runs, marginalising bowlers emancipates the game.

  • 9ST9 on October 31, 2013, 9:19 GMT

    Yeah right but any mention about the ridiculously one-sided batting feather-beds offered in India? 3 Years ago a SL vs India game had both teams scoring 400+, even as far as 2002 I remember the WI vs India series[in India of course] where scores like 290-300 were chased down effortlessly. The rules MAY have a say in it but do we see such huge batting fests in other parts of the world ?

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:16 GMT

    Even with the new rule, Yuvraj 0 off 3 balls, not even used as a bowler, when even Raina and Kohli got to bowl. Time to get Pujara and Dinesh Karthik in the team, they also play fast bowling very well. Pujara is so special, it is unbelievable that he has not played more ODIs at a set spot) opener instead of Rohit or at no 4) to set himself into the format. Rohit shows why he will be good in test cricket--he can withstand the new ball swing, and also a lot of short pitched stuff, mostly he only gets out when he tries to accelerate, which is not a problem in test cricket.

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:14 GMT

    hmmm its another huge chase of 350.. wats happening. in da past india named as the poorest chaser in da world , once, againest srilanka, and pakistan india use to loose matches very badly. even targets are low and moderate like 245, 270. in chasing. after that india improved by playing 7 batsmen RAHUL as keeper . india used to win more matches chasing, after that in RAHULS captaincy, india won 16 consicutive chases DHONI as keeper. everything is fine. NOW wats happening is THE NEW RULES in odis killing the batting first teams and bowlers. the worst thing is seperating batting powerplay allowing it tohave before 40th over. a blender mistake . apart from that reasons for yesterdays win..are 1) players attitude changed 2)heavy ipl t20 effect 3} low bowling quality from aussie 4) only four fielders allowed 5)pitches areDEAD.home conditions....kholi is a very good player no doubt about that earlier kohli use to got out on boundaries but now all are 4s

  • o-bomb on October 31, 2013, 9:11 GMT

    Push the boundaries back out. There is now so much playing area not used because the ropes have been brought in too far to make 6s easier to hit. 6s should be difficult to hit and yet we see mishits going for 6. That can't be right. Push the boundaries back out, use the whole playing area and you'll see a better game.

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:06 GMT

    A double century should be consider as a century in such dead Indian pitches.

  • on October 31, 2013, 9:03 GMT

    dear ICC members we all know that cricket became commercial sports. please maintain its tradition of fighting each other in all aspects of the game. 1. get back to thenold concept of using one ball per one innings which allow the fast bowlers to use thier reverse swinging art which they learned. 2. keep that old concept of keeping minimum 4 fileders inside the 40 yards circle. 3. DRS system make it mandatory for all the ODI and test. 4. total 20 overs of power play. 10 up front mandatory and 5 for the bat team and 5 for the fielding team. if you make all these changes being a cricket lover we will surely see nail baiting games where cricketers used their brain and arts which they learned from childhood. rather slog. try to understand the difference between ODI & T20. don't mix up with each other. the changes what ICC making I can see in coming years test also end up with power play and 2 new ball both ends. and free hit etc. or else add some bowlers in the ICC committee.

  • scarab666 on October 31, 2013, 9:01 GMT

    How about we stop playing so many games in India where all the pitches are virtually identical flat track crap.

  • on October 31, 2013, 8:59 GMT

    ODI cricket has changed now. At one time, ODI cricket means chasing down 270-280 which was a feat and a team with disciplined bowlers, things turned interesting. With the new rules, ODI has lost its charm. 325 being an average score in any team batting first, is puzzling. The more puzzling is the ease with which the opponent chase it down. Lets be straight. If a team needs 180 to win from last 20 overs, this is modern cricket, with sixes and boundaries. Why do we need T20 format then? Change the rules, bring the spirit of cricket alive. ODI is always the best format of the game. Now things have changed. We need to bring it back.

  • SL_BiggestJoke on October 31, 2013, 8:55 GMT

    As a bowler it doesn't make sense to me. If I bowl in a way which a batsman can lift me then it's a bad bowl - doesn't matter how many fielders are in the circle or out of the circle. A bowler's job is to make the life of a batsman difficult and not allow any room, whatever the conditions.. flat pitch/ green pitch/ brown pitch/ white ball/ red ball . Period!

  • on October 31, 2013, 8:12 GMT

    Sir Dhoni, we are happy that our team is gunning down big time targets and matches are getting more interesting. You should be happy that young guns have started to fire, so do not worry even you will get your chances to score some runs. After all one nobody want so see any more one man show like before. Now we have heavy weights like Rohit, dhawan, virat and Raina so lets the heavy weights get a shot as well.

  • on October 31, 2013, 8:03 GMT

    The ICC has punished Sri Lanka for producing bad pitches, they should also punish BCCI for producing bad pitches. The pitches that were played on may as well have been concrete. I agree with Dhoni though, the rules do need to be changed as there is almost no incentive to pick specialist bowlers as they'll go for as many runs as the part-timers.

  • Biso on October 31, 2013, 8:02 GMT

    Dhoni is talking sense. These rules will not work in the entire sub continent. Don't forget that India won the Champions Trophy in England recently where the same bowlers fared well. The new rules are in favour of Pace bowlers who cannot reverse swing the ball. Even if faster and bouncier pitches are made the batsmen will soon learn to play baseball shots and in the near future you will see more and more batsmen exposing all three stumps to somehow hoick the ball over the infield into the general direction of a big open space. Batting will look ugly then. Batsmen will prefer gym's rather than honing their skills in the nets. Imagine what a batsmen like Chris Gayle can do ? More the bounce more happily he will swing his bat horizontally for sixes and fours.

  • pest13 on October 31, 2013, 8:00 GMT

    i must say on dis kind of track & with the new rules even i can score some runs.i mean these odis have actually become absolutely ridiculous.scoring centuries seem to be child's play.with no offence to baileys & kohlis & dhawans and other batsmen, there hundreds never seem to be as much hard-earned as they used to be with earlier batsmen.i think icc must immediately get back to the old rules like 15 0vers powerplay, 5 fielders outside the circle etc.with that pitches must be atleast a little bit supportive to the bowlers.these seem to be cemented ones nowadays.350 seem to be something like 270-280.have to say get some parity back between bowling & batting or else odis are going nowhere from here on.

  • ramli on October 31, 2013, 7:58 GMT

    MSD is right to ask for reviewing the new rules ... it is one thing to get used to new rules and that can be done over time by bowlers and teams ... in fact, it will equally benefit fast bowlers from either sides in friendly pitch conditions ... it has not aided the true fast bowlers from Aussie either ... but importantly whether we need the new rules at all after seeing a few games ... it has become merely two 20 overs game in one innings ... the right mixture of laboring for runs and smart cricket is lost ...

  • Sachin_The_Greatest on October 31, 2013, 7:53 GMT

    @ All

    Pitches has been same in India for years, neither they have improved nor they have worsened. So you can't balme only pitches for that.

    & to all those who are giving example of PAK SA match. please check the batting line up of both the teams, we all know how fregile Pakistan's batting line up & with all due respect SA has only two proven Quality batsmen in yesterday's match i.e. Smith & AB.

    Despite these docile pitches India had never chased anything near to 350. so it has to be rules & some very very ordinary indian bowling. though Australia has decent attack & still they could not defend 350 twice.

  • on October 31, 2013, 7:51 GMT

    Two ball rule is handy for bowlers provided they get to play ODIs in green seamers or overcast conditions conducive to swing bowling. But this rule absolutely destroys bowlers in flat tracks and generally in the sub-continent.

    Similarly, in such conditions or even in a track that turns and assist spin bowlers, the one extra fielder to be stationed inside the circle, as per the revised playing conditions, come in handy for bowlers as it will be risky for the batsmen to go for big shots and maneuvering for singles will be more difficult due to the presence of one additional fielder in the ring.

    What is above stated is theory as it is not common to find green seamers or rank turners for ODIs. Swinging conditions can still be found across the cricketing world.

    Anyway, it is very clear that this rule is against the basic concept behind 'Rules & Regulations'. The purpose of rules should be to create a balance and this rule is doing exactly the opposite.

  • AltafPatel on October 31, 2013, 7:49 GMT

    From where comes new fielding rules when batsmen hit sixes ...! with 2 balls from 2 ends, fasters or seamers should get help, but thats not as well. at-lease be logical. why dont ask curator to prepare sporting pitches.

  • on October 31, 2013, 7:38 GMT

    Can ICC think about applying adaptable rules according to the Geographical Areas around the world? Only to make the Game to have more interest to learn how to play in different conditions for both players and fans.[chunks of rules for different location which suits more their conditions Like some kind of multiplexing techniques applied for communication?]

  • AltafPatel on October 31, 2013, 7:34 GMT

    Mr Dhoni, why you back unsporting pitch with new rules ? Doesnt it apply to SA-Pak lower scoring match ?

  • gandabhai on October 31, 2013, 7:32 GMT

    With these new rules we don't have to watch the whole match because all the teams will be able to put up a big total and all the teams will be able to get close to that .Just switch on for the last 5 overs as that will be the only part of the match that will be exiting . Everything before the last 5 overs will eventually become a big bore and not worth watching .

  • on October 31, 2013, 7:27 GMT

    For the first time after reading his comments in post matches after a while [I don't] know, where it goes - it is from Dhoni. It seems the learning is getting exponential adding more fear/curious factor to the Course of learning for Dhoni. Let's see how it goes how Virat/Raina observes it

  • ReverseSweepIndia on October 31, 2013, 7:09 GMT

    well, Dhoni makes lot of sense. What is the point if after an ODI match say figures of say Steyn, Anderson, Johnson, Junaid and Ishant Sharma are almost similar?

  • gatman11 on October 31, 2013, 7:07 GMT

    Talking about change of ODI rules! Are people aware of the matches being played in the rest of the world. SA beat Pakistan the same day in Sharjah after managing only 184 as the target for Pakistan to chase. A batting side, no matter how easy the conditions are, still has to make those runs and doing it in so robot like manner is something extraordinary which shows the class of Indian Batting line up in general and Kohli in particular. You can't have different rules for different grounds or regions or teams for that matter.

  • on October 31, 2013, 7:03 GMT

    I have an idea; produce a pitch instead of a road.

  • cnksnk on October 31, 2013, 6:58 GMT

    The sad thing about these new rules, was that it was framed by a technical committee comprising of ex international cricketers of great repute and experience. As far as I remember Kumble, Clive Lloyd were part of the committee. Not sure on what was their thought process in arrivving at these rulez. Surely Kumble atleast would have been aware of its impact on spinners. Fairly ill thought out strategy .

  • king_julien on October 31, 2013, 6:41 GMT

    The rules are getting more and more ridiculous......and the most worrying part is that most of these were not even required in the first place. When you try to fix something which is not broken you sometimes end up breaking it.

    First they had introduced the new ball after 35 over rule, considering that reverse swing used to start happening at 33-34, it killed off that aspect. Then this two new ball rule, at 30 overs both balls are 15 over old which spinners find hard to grip and then dew sets in. At the end the balls are 25 over old so no reverse swing. Then these free hits and 4 bowlers inside the circle........kill reverse swing, kill spinners and finally do away with bowlers themselves.....Way to go ICC

    And by killing the bowlers, you are killing the batsman too. Only skill which will be tested now is how far a batsman can hit the ball, not how to tackle reverse swing or play quality spin. Pretty soon cricket will be baseball, with all muscle bound hulks.

  • heathrf1974 on October 31, 2013, 6:37 GMT

    @FAB_ALI I think you've got it about right.

  • tsidd on October 31, 2013, 6:33 GMT

    i think ICC has got to think of the games future as at one point they are tryiong to revive the longer format and on the other hand killing the one day format what have they got in thier minds

  • HDG1978 on October 31, 2013, 6:23 GMT

    I completely agree with srini_chennai. After the Ashes later this year, we will know the real class of Bailey, Maxwell and Watson in challenging Test match conditions against the superior English bowling attack. Their first class records amply shows that they are pretty ordinary and made to look great by some shoddy Indian bowling, batsmen-friendly ODI rules and flat Indian pitches. I had made the very point about the sinister intention to negate spin bowling, the strength of subcontinental teams and reverse swing through the new ODI rules implemented by the ICC.

  • FAB_ALI on October 31, 2013, 6:03 GMT

    First 15 overs of straight powerplay with maximum 3 fielders outside and then upto 5 in the remaining 35. Start with one ball and mandatory change it after 25 overs..simple as that!!

  • Rahul_78 on October 31, 2013, 5:56 GMT

    Flat pitches, short boundaries, fast outfields, heavy bats, scoops, switch hits, 2 new balls to kill the reverse swing and spinners, 20 overs of power play and icing on the cake to allow only 4 fielders outside the 30 yard circle what else does ICC wants to come up with? May be put restrictions on the run ups of the bowlers, Put speed limit on fast bowlers and signal it as a no ball if it goes over the specified speed limit. The governors of the game is reducing the contest between bat and ball to a farce. Who enjoys a light weight boxer contesting against a heavy weight. This is exactly what the game of cricket has become. MSD is absolutely justified in questioning the new rules. What is the rationale behind allowing only 4 fielders outside thecircles? Either ICC should stop playing with the rules of the game or make some sensible decisions to get some parity between the contest of bat and ball. How about allowing 2 bouncers in powerplay and 6 fielders outside circles in last 7 overs?

  • cnksnk on October 31, 2013, 5:44 GMT

    It is becomming fairly predictable and boring to watch these 350+ scores. Bowlers are cannon fodder. ICC can look at the following options to make the game. 1) No field restrictions. Captain can have the option to set his fields. BATSMEN must run singles better incase the fielders are on the boundry.2) Corrolary to point 1, no need for power plays. 3) no restriction in number of short balls, although balls above shoulder height will be no ball 3) minimum boundry size will be 70 yards. Biundry ropes should not be pulled in by more than 5 m (for safety reasons). In smaller grounds letthe pickets be the boundry. 4) we can have 2 new balls, but at he end of the 35 th over, the fielding captain should choose one of the balls which will be used for the remaining 15 overs. This is just to ensure that the white ball doe not become too dirty. Thus the one ball will be used for 17 - 18 overs and the other for 32 overs.

    If some of these are introduced then there will be some parity.

  • Srini_Indian on October 31, 2013, 5:42 GMT

    ICC just want to kill the spinners and hence all the sub-continental countries. Its quite painful to see Maxwell, Hughes, Bailey and Watson who'd otherwise be clueless against spin with old rules are made to look like genius of spin bowlers. Common, I want to see the Australia of 4 test series when they were thrashed and humiliated by spin.

  • Riderstorm on October 31, 2013, 5:35 GMT

    The cricket authorities have screwed up the game of cricket so much in the last year with these rule changes that they haven't done in atleast a decade. I just realized the folly of the two new balls. The authorities could've atleast tested their theories at the domestic level before implementing them at the international level. If this is the path they've chosen, it's better to replace the bowlers with machines as they are hardly being given a chance to compete with the constant rule changes partial toward the batsmen.

  • rashivkd on October 31, 2013, 4:58 GMT

    Everyone is now against Dhoni stating weakest bowlers and flat pitches are the problems. My points are, 1. Then what about the Aus bowlers. Are they also weak, 2. Every pitch in every country has a culture, there is no point to ask to prepare Perth pitch a batter friendly to counter if it produced 150- scores regularly. 3. Before this rules came in to the mix, Indian pitches were flat as same, but after 20-25 overs it gives a lot of help to spinners and fast bowlers (reverse swing) and so teams are tent to start attacking in the early part and lost wickets regularly. But now, teams are not taking any risk till 30 overs and they are backing to score 200 in last twenty easily. Before this rules came, this had been the part bowlers got help from the pitch. 4. Now the difference between power play and non-power play are only one fielder. That itself says all!!

  • on October 31, 2013, 4:58 GMT

    Thanks to the T20, the ODI game has evolved, like the ODI's evolved the Test Matches. 400+ scores would be the norm in the future, and I feel for the bowlers, as everything is pitted against them starting from pitches, rules, power plays and the shorter boundaries. May be 2 new balls might work in favor of the bowlers in Seamer friendly conditions, but definitely not in the subcontinent where the Reverse swing effect is drastically reduced and the also the spinners don't get the soft old ball. Again in most India grounds, the boundaries are shortened and the new power play not allowing more than 4 players outside the 30 yard circle with fast bowlers bowling without Third-man and Fine leg is cruel on the bowlers.

    I am wondering at what pace would a player like Viv Richards would have scored in this type of situation, we certainly need to refine the rules in such a way at least the ratio should be 70:30... and the wickets needs to be a sporty with assistance to all types of bowlers...

  • SamRoy on October 31, 2013, 4:40 GMT

    Not just the rules, I think the boundary sizes at most venues need to come under scanner. Mis-hits going for sixes is just ridiculous! I know most spectators don't care about the sanctity of the game and only be entertained with 4s and 6s. 6-hitting should be difficult and not easy. Also I have said in several forums the white ball is not good enough for balance between bat and ball as it stops doing anything after 6-7 overs. Now two new balls are taking spinners and reverse at the end of an innings out of the question. That's why play with the red ball on weekends during the day. No need of playing day night games on Weekends in October.

  • NP_NY on October 31, 2013, 4:36 GMT

    @Ali H: You said "Dhoni is forgetting that 350+ targets mostly happen in India". Have you checked your stats? When did it happen in India? Only in the current series after the new rule has been implemented. The new rule encourages batsmen to play shots that they wouldn't otherwise play and hence contributes to 30-40 runs more.

  • on October 31, 2013, 4:35 GMT

    The problem is that Indian pitches generally assist spinners more than the fast bowlers - and due to the new rules, the spinners hardly get any wickets as the ball hardly gets old and the batsmen just have to try clearing the inner circle (with very few fielders outside it).

  • DaisonGarvasis on October 31, 2013, 4:16 GMT

    I find it hard to understand why Dhoni is blaming new rules for poor bowling and/or flat pitches! At the same time this run fest was going on between IND-AUS, there was another match plated between PAK-SA and SA defended 183 (yes, in an ODI). I suppose the rules were same for both the game. What was different was the quality of bowling and probably the pitch conditions. Pakistan tie down the SA's good batting line up to 183 and then SA's good bowling line up defended it. I guess Dhoni should ask the curators more questions than the "new rules". In fact, blaming the new rules for this run scoring is belittling Kohli's fantastic innings. The delivery that got Yuvi was unplayable. Faulkner really troubled Dhoni. In the same game, Kohli took guard in 5th gear and blasted away. The 350 that AUS scored is due to Poor Indian Bowling and the 351 that india scored is down to FANTASTIC BATTING.

  • goldeneye075 on October 31, 2013, 4:15 GMT

    This only happens in dead pitchers in INDIA. It's about time they make bowler friendly surfaces. What about the match PAK vs SA, both teams had quality bowlers, when they do have quality bowlers it's hard to score runs, and to milk singles in the middle overs. But then again surfaces should give some advantage to the bowlers for a change.

  • on October 31, 2013, 4:12 GMT

    People talking about SA vs PAK match should understand that Pak just failed to do a simple job. Even SA might have been surprised with the PAK surrender. #1 and #2 teams are playing here... Dhoni has a point. If you want to empower the bowlers, then there are better ways than these new ODI rules. The wicket was slow, but the spinners have to bowl with 2 new balls... These pitches are suited for spinners, but they are nullified.

  • late_reverse_swing on October 31, 2013, 4:00 GMT

    I am not quite sure what kind of scrutiny the proposals go through before becoming a rule. But, over the last decade the bowler has been marginalized to being a almost irrelevant entity. First a free hit for a new ball, this I believe curtails bowlers from trying that extra bit during crunch times. Then this 4 fielders rule, in this T20 era where batsmen have become efficient at *improvising* and also with the real dense bats, he hardly needs extra open spaces. There used to be a time when going over extra-cover and midwicket was a skill that needed to be exercised in the middle overs, now it need not be as skillful. I guess we need more bowlers to sit in on those panels ...

  • cricfreakharsh on October 31, 2013, 3:54 GMT

    I m die hard fan of cricket...I m completely agree with MSD..new ODI rules should be changed immediately for the sake of good health of the game...in subcontinent any team can score such kind of score..if we play with these dumb rules at huge grounds like MCG or SCG, it will be irritating for any fielding side...next WC is in AUS & NZ..AUS have some huge grounds in world cricket & NZ have very small grounds..hence change we need for some quality cricket...

  • on October 31, 2013, 3:53 GMT

    One good thing about MSD's comments, it's after winning both matches chasing 350+ comfortably. Had he lost and said this, he would've been termed a sore loser. I think it is very important for the game that it is restored back to 5 fielders outside. ODI is already evolving due to T20 and we can see that from the scores of late. People blame Indian pitches, but it remains the same for both teams. I agree there is a need for sporting pitches, but our pitches are still better than dead pitches in SL & Pak. I believe ICC should implement giving one or two bowlers a maximum of 12 overs instead of 10 as ideally in every game, not every bowler has a bad day. This will bring out some better battles and closer games. Please do not destroy bowlers, what more can they do? ICC, are you listening?

  • rajpan on October 31, 2013, 3:52 GMT

    Will the new rules be changed ? Depends on who inspired the changes in the first place and for what reason. I suspect the rules were changed to enhance the chances of teams with better bowling resources than those thriving on better quality of batters. Better bowling would not have allowed the asian teams to score as much as non-asian team batters would against the weak asian bowling. But it doesn't seem to be working at least in asian conditions. The real difference will be seen in non-asian conditions.

  • Anil_Koshy on October 31, 2013, 3:47 GMT

    Instead of talking about new rules, he should think about the composition of the side, players like Raina are not good even when there are not fielders outside the circle. He should stop players from CSK, should think about national side, and preparing for next world cup, which is to be held in Aus/Nzl, there will be more bounce. Raina cannot play fast bowlers on Indian soil, how do we expect him to play in fast bouncy wickets.

  • on October 31, 2013, 3:43 GMT

    What nonsense! Dhoni is trying to safeguard his weak bowlers. Compare the match played yesterday of Pakistan vs South Africa. What a match it was? Were they having different rules? ICC cricket committee should stand on it's decision. They should not bow down to BCCI again as I am sure BCCI will come out with it to safeguard their players who are hammered all over.

  • on October 31, 2013, 3:28 GMT

    Kohli is excellent........Give chance to Samson n Rayudu in place of yuvraj n Raina to test them before 2015 wc.......Technically better than raina n Yuvraj is not in previous form........

  • kevivnajar on October 31, 2013, 3:23 GMT

    Well said, Dhoni. Your complaints about the rules are valid. But looking at the SA Vs Pak match that happened the same day with same new rules, no body is going to listen to you. Prepare pitches that support bowlers and even 250 can be defended.

  • himanshu.team on October 31, 2013, 3:09 GMT

    I cannot agree with Dhoni more. Everyone is critisising Indian bowlers. What about the aussies. India was critisised for failing to defend 300. Australia have failed to defend scores of 350 plus twice! On both occasions India did it with relative ease. There was never any pressure on the Indian batsmen. These are flat tracks, talented hard hitting batsmen and good international bowlers. These are the no.1 and no.2 ranked teams in the world. I wonder what would happen if India were to play NewZealand, Bangladesh, Sri lanka etc. on these wickets. Even in the challenger trophy in supposedly bowler friendly conditions, a number of high scoring matches took place. I no longer find in interesting to watch. I only watch the game when India is batting and not when they are bowling. This is something ICC should look at right away and rectify. Cricket is about a fair competition between bat and ball. This is exactly the opposite of it.

  • itsganu on October 31, 2013, 3:07 GMT

    New ODI rules is just part of the problem. Look at Pak vs SA match. The score was just 180 odd and still SA won. In my view first BCCI should look at quality of piches,try to produce quality bowlers and then review the new ODI rules.

  • on October 31, 2013, 3:07 GMT

    Kudos to Dhoni for supporting bowlers. Respect. Respect and only respect.

  • crick_sucks on October 31, 2013, 2:57 GMT

    Adds value to the statement made after being on the winning side. It is not a sore losers excuse but a genuine cause of concern. ICC should look into this new set of rules. There are a quite a few venues around the world esp. in ODIs where 300 has become a norm. With these set of rules even 350 is a not so safe score. But well done to Virat. He is just amazing at the moment. To me he has the best qualities of Sachin and Bevan.

  • on October 31, 2013, 2:48 GMT

    These comments are some of the most sensible I have read for a long time from a captain. The ICC has skewed the game of cricket too much in favour of batsmen, particularly in the shorter forms of the game. These ICC overlords seem to think that a cricket contest necessarily becomes boring if bowlers are able to constantly take wickets. The somehow seem to think that huge scores are the only things that make a contest poignant. They only need to recall the drama that Curtly Ambrose created when he took 7 wickets for one run against Australia, or when Wasim and Waqar would wreck batsmen hopes of greatness, or when Shane Warne and company silenced home crowds. Don't even begin to mention Allan Donald and Muttiah Murilitharan doing their magic for their countries. The lesson here: bowlers need to have an incentive to make the game of cricket worth it. The ICC is chasing the money, and like any good capitalist system, it is bound to be self-destructive.

  • luks on October 31, 2013, 2:45 GMT

    Why not time to think about pitches? We need more pitches like the one for the last Ranji Trophy game between Mumbai and Haryana. Even Tendulkar said he enjoyed batting there and showed how he is a class apart on tough pitches.

  • on October 31, 2013, 2:42 GMT

    three cheers for indian victory hip hip hurrah,hip hip hurrah.God bless India.and the indian cricket team.

  • CrICkeeet on October 31, 2013, 2:28 GMT

    I think at least maximum 4 outside the ring should change... otherwise, very soon it's turning in2 baseball

  • TRAM on October 31, 2013, 1:23 GMT

    There is no logic in the new rules. If T20 allows 5 fielders outside the circle, why 50 overs game allows only 4 (during majority of the overs)?? Why not put all the fielders inside the circle? It will result in much more boundaries. Scores would be like 700 out of 50 overs! There has to be some sense in the rules. If there is no even contest between bat & ball the interest is gone.

  • DRS_Flawed_NeedsImprovement on October 31, 2013, 1:03 GMT

    first, icc trying to destroy test cricket by introducing drs and now odi, by introducing new rules. Or is this conspiracy by icc to make (less popular, bored, onesided, less viewed) test matches popular by destroying (exciting, most popular, highly viewed) odi?

  • bobagorof on October 31, 2013, 0:50 GMT

    I must say I'm getting bored with all these over-300 (and over-350) scores. It used to be something special when a team reached 300, and you knew it would be a great game if the opposition came close or managed to chase it down. In this series it has happened so often that I've just lost interest - and considering it was a rather irrelevant series to begin with, the game can't afford to disenfranchise the people who do actually take the time to watch. The lack of wickets from the bowlers (10 wickets or less for 700+ runs in 2 of the 4 completed matches, five 150+ partnerships and 3 other 100+ partnerships) is very disappointing. Dhoni has a point - who wants to see 7 hours of fours and sixes? When a team scores 350 and you know it will be chased down the game gets very uninteresting and centuries become meaningless. Think about that - centuries become meaningless. Cricket should be a contest between bat and ball, not bat and bat.

  • on October 31, 2013, 0:46 GMT

    I hate to watch ODI matches these days. It is more like a baseball game, the powerful strikers reap rich dividends. Kohli has become the fastest to score 17 centuries with an amazing strike rate. Would you still compare Kohli with Viv? As Boycott would have put it even my mom would have scored a few centuries with the new rules.

  • RamShankarS on October 31, 2013, 0:42 GMT

    Dhoni is spot-on. I think the new rules make the game batsmen-friendly, and it has become a bat vs bat sport than a bat vs ball sport. Part-timers cannot survive in this format with these rules, and they did add extra glamour with the old rules. As MSD puts it, in the long-run, the format may not exist. If every match has such a result, then the team batting first wouldn't know what is a sure-shot target to set for the chasing team. With two new balls, we might probably not see another Waqar, Wasim or Zaheer.

  • D-Ascendant on October 31, 2013, 0:34 GMT

    There were two one-day games played last night. Despite the exceptional batting of Kohli, and some splendid bowling by the underrated Bhuvi, I know which game I preferred - the low-scoring thriller between SA and Pakistan.

    While I admit I'm a nostalgist - my favourite World Cup to date remains 1992, when even 220 was defendable - but I think a lot of people concerned about the good of the game realise that the administrators have taken it too far. If bowlers are treated like garbage, and sixes and fours are all there is to watch, what's the point of having bowlers at all? We can just have batters squaring up against bowling machines, competing with each other to smash the ball the furthest.l

  • dj_dhananjay on October 31, 2013, 0:25 GMT

    Not sure what Dhoni is on about !!! Take a look at the SA vs Pak game - A team was restricted to 183 & still managed to defend it..!!! By Dhoni's definition 183 now = 130 before rules changes ??? What the SA vs Pak game suggests is that you stop complaining about the rules & work on improving the bowling & feilding unit ..!!!

  • johnathonjosephs on October 31, 2013, 0:20 GMT

    Barring the 1st game (in which everyone undestimated the Australian team), all the rest of the games have been won by the team batting 2nd. These rules are ridiculous and gives the team batting 2nd an easy opportunity to chase. With no help for the bowlers, I see the 7th game in Bangalore being a toss up - whoever ends up batting 2nd will win. With Bailey/Voges/Watson in good form and Dhawan/Kholi is good form, any team batting 2nd will chase down a 300+ score.

  • on October 30, 2013, 23:48 GMT

    Time to go back to the original rule of 1st 15 overs only two outside the circle and afterwards you can do spread the field to a certain extent.

    All these crazy ODI adjustments the ICC has tried in the last 8 years has made no sense & just complicate things.

  • on October 30, 2013, 23:38 GMT

    Well Dhoni is right, the batsmen are getting stronger and stronger day by day and the bowlers are left helpless. It would be better off that the free-hit should be finished from ODI's and bowlers should be allowed to bowl a maximum of 12 overs Other than this the umpires should be a bit more linient on the leg side wides and in DRS the decisions which are 'Umpire's Call' should be OUT

  • cricket_ahan on October 30, 2013, 23:35 GMT

    Kohli is going from strength to strength.... in ALL forms of the game. What an amazing find he is. Not sure if he is captain material just yet, but he surely looks on the path to becoming one of the best batsmen India has ever produced. Loving the current India top 6 batting order.

  • HatersAreOrdinary on October 30, 2013, 23:10 GMT

    sad but true it only happens in india. your spectator friendly pitches are killing the game. look at the SA vs PAk game. what happened there.

  • jmcilhinney on October 30, 2013, 22:38 GMT

    Congratulations to India but, with regards to the scores and the rules, the same rules were in force during the CT in England recently, yet we didn't see scores like this there. As most people are already aware, the pitches in India are a big factor in these high-scoring affairs. Obviously limited-overs pitches are more docile the world over but, from the scores, these ones seem to be in a coma.

  • musquito on October 30, 2013, 22:14 GMT

    Enough is enough. I've never seen a sport intentionally become so one sided in favour of one discipline over another. As if heavier bats weren't enough administrators are killing the contest even further with short boundaries, fielding restrictions and the two new balls. Baseball has gone the other way, bringing in rules to ensure that the contest between pitchers and batters remains even. Baseball understands that the fans want to see more than just home runs.

  • on October 30, 2013, 21:58 GMT

    I wont blame on fielding rules are making 350 runs. There are lot to contribute to it Flat Track, Fast Outfield, Small Boundaries and Poor Bowling are main reason. Same rule is there since Oct 2012 but if you see the score of Champion's Trophy it was never 300. Just one other match concluded where Pak failed to pass 183 mark in Abu Dhabi. I would say entire system need to be rethinked. Two new balls have made it tough for spinner and fast bowler (reverse swing). Its not 4 fielders but its over all movement towards Batting domination is creating this..

  • bofatrf1 on October 30, 2013, 21:39 GMT

    Dhoni - the rules have not changed nor has the playing conditions - what has changed is Tendulkar is no longer playing. We have the same dead Indian pitches, poor bowling attach and a furiously loyal fan base. See how much 1 persons retirement can change how team. Earlier we looked at Tendulkars centuries and not our victory and today is has been proved beyond reasonable doubt that batting in Indian pitches is one of the easiest tasks.

  • on October 30, 2013, 21:34 GMT

    The new ODI rules don't work in Indian conditions -- whoever put that rule in had no idea how ODI cricket is played in the subcontinent. Reverse swing and spin with the old ball are the only two real weapons available to bowlers on these tracks, and the stupid administrators have taken them away with the 2-new balls rule. The rule may work in places like England and Australia where there's a bit more swing and bounce, but in the subcontinent the old ball is the fielding side's friend, not enemy.

  • coldcoffee123 on October 30, 2013, 21:31 GMT

    At the rate at which ICC is churning out degrading bowling conditions, I will not be surprised if one day there is a rule that allows only the bowler and the wicketkeeper to be on the field. This way batsmen can score 1500+ runs in 50 overs. Never ever will there be a contest between bat and ball of the kind we saw in Akram, Waqar, Lee, Warne, Mcgrath, Kumble, Murali, Ambrose, Walsh, Flintoff's times. So long, fast bowlers. RIP.

  • on October 30, 2013, 21:29 GMT

    Flat Tracks and new fielding rules..!!! Tendulkar's records should be broken in 10 years if not less.

  • on October 30, 2013, 21:05 GMT

    Dhoni is right, ICC should review the rule changes. Cricket was interesting even when 240 - 260 was the avg score and above 270 was tough ask. We loved cricket the way it was at the time. Even 20 over power plays should be changed. Its not fair in the long run to have consistent rule changes.

  • KingOwl on October 30, 2013, 21:04 GMT

    It is more than the rules. Look at the Pak Vs SA match. Same rules, but what an amazing match. It is the flat Indian tracks that are resulting in these boring run-fests. Bowlers need a hand to play. Even rank turners are way better than flat tracks. At least the spinners will thrive. And good batsmen against spin will still make runs.

  • BigINDFan on October 30, 2013, 21:03 GMT

    MSD has a good point - why not play more T20s with these rules than ODIs? I question the value of ODIs. Why not just play Tests and T20s. If ODIs need meaning then make it more bowler friendly so that it feels like a Test match with guaranteed result.

    For entertainment T20s is good enough.

  • reason-galore on October 30, 2013, 21:03 GMT

    i think it is more about the pathetic flat indian wickets than anything else... due to t20, everyone knows how to score quick without losing too many wickets...

  • amitdashore on October 30, 2013, 20:57 GMT

    had these new rules not been there, India's chases could have been more difficult! Indian batsmen hit boundaries, while Aus batsmen hit more sixes, which means its been poor bowling more than rules that r killing the game!

  • Neela80 on October 30, 2013, 20:57 GMT

    I agree with Dhoni, it is high time, we reconsider the new ODI rules.

    Batsmen are loosing the art of running ones and twoes even threes. They could just stand there and play four dots and bang two sixes in a row to score 12 a over easily, espcially with the kind of bats they get these days. You have to give some thing to bowlers to look-up to, removing 10-Over per innings cap to start-with. It is really hurting cricket's future... watching these 350+ scores, how many kids would want to bowl and aspire to be a big, angry, fast bowler ??. I bet every kid would want a pick-up a bat and start smashing for fours and sixes.

    1. Two ball theory is good, but it should be like the 2nd new ball from the start of 35th over, allowing 1st ball to reverse, if it gets dirty in the process so be it. 2. Removing 10-Over Cap will allow, teams to choose 4-genuine Fast/Spin Bolwlers and bowl extended spells and six/seven proper Batsmen 3. No field restrictons in non-power play overs.

  • asiacricket1234 on October 30, 2013, 20:54 GMT

    No dhoni time to think about your bowlers quality and the pathetic pitches India have. No other team is spilling so much run. Its not happening in other countries either so there has to be something wrong with the quality of your bowler and pitch you play on. Just because you are struggling doesn't mean its bad rule

  • mrmonty on October 30, 2013, 20:53 GMT

    At this rate, there will be soon laws banning fielders altogether. Just keeper and bowler.

  • Wayne_Larkins_Barnet on October 30, 2013, 20:40 GMT

    Agree, the rules are not making for great viewing though credit to India for chasing down a couple of big scores,

  • KumarSubramanyan on October 30, 2013, 20:37 GMT

    The ICC have been tweaking the rules to make the game more batting friendly. In a couple of years, I won't be surprised to see the following rules:

    1) All 11 fielders to be within the 30 yard circle. 2) No bowler can bowl at speeds more than 120km/ph 3) No bowler can spin the ball more than once every over 4) No player can take a catch when diving 5) LBWs are being done away with - now no batsman can be out LBW

    Good Luck to all youngsters who are trying to become bowlers.. Kumar Subramanyan

  • on October 30, 2013, 19:49 GMT

    i think it is only in india where we have seen such big targets being chased so often. 2 factors: a mighty batting line up and batting friendly wickets & less effective bowlers.

    I dont think there is anything with rules. How many times we have seen 300+ score since new rule all over the world? and how many times 300+ being chased down since october last year?

  • on October 30, 2013, 19:47 GMT

    I suspect he means that cricket is becoming more batsman-centric . It might eliminate the thrill of enjoying the contest between bat and ball and could lead to utter boredom after some time. If he means to say so , he is right and a stronger stand on the subject by like MSD will be highly appreciated by cricket lovers world over.

  • on October 30, 2013, 19:46 GMT

    Baba Aparajith & Rishi Dhawan are good replacement for Mishra and Isanth. please give them chance in one day and test. In one day if they given 60 or 70 run also; they can manage with bat. They are good promising all rounders. For what we need Mishra and Ishant (They are not bowling well and also they cannot bat)

  • Unmesh_cric on October 30, 2013, 19:43 GMT

    These new rules were made with good intentions. The idea of having 2 new balls was to provide swing to the fast bowlers for longer period of time. Generally in the middle overs, the fielding captain adopts a defensive strategy and the batsmen are happy to milk the bowling. The idea of bringing one more fielder inside was to make the fielding captains looks for wickets instead of being defensive. They also allowed 2 bouncers in an over instead of one. So this was all done to make it better for the bowlers. But these flat pitches make a complete mockery of this idea. The 2 new balls become a disadvantage on flat pitches, as the balls disappear faster to the boundary. One more fielder inside means there are less fielders to protect the boundary. So I would blame these pitches rather than the rules which were well-intended. Just provide the bowlers a pitch with little bit more assistance and all these rules make sense.

  • Harmony111 on October 30, 2013, 19:33 GMT

    This article shows how deep MSD thinks. Before the CT13, he had said that this was the first time they were playing away under the new rules and had no idea how his team will fare. Turns out they did very well, defeating nearly all teams in the contest except NZ.

    When ICC mandated that there can be only 4 and not 5 fielders in the deep, what were they thinking? Quite clearly, they too wanted scoring rates to go up. This is why the concept of Powerplays came into being as the original 15 over rule was broken up and one laughable bowling powerplay was also added up.

    The bowling powerplay was one of the most stupid rules ever made. It was a liability for the bowling team and they wanted to get rid of it at the best time, it gave no real adv to them.

    Two new balls in conjunction with the floating powerplay + 4 fielder rule is causing all this spike on scoring rates. Well set batsmen can score a lot in 30 balls esp if they are new.

    I think it is time to remove the powerplay altogether.

  • on October 30, 2013, 19:28 GMT

    More than the rules, time to think about different pitches. With the same rules, SA and PAK had a low scoring thriller. They both also have stronger bowling attacks compared to AUS and IND.

  • Muyeen on October 30, 2013, 19:25 GMT

    I dont think it is just about Rules change in ODI.same day we see another ODI Pakistan Vs South Africa where 182 is defended. I think it has also got to do pitch,bowling combination and batting.

  • on October 30, 2013, 19:23 GMT

    Dhoni is forgetting that 350+ targets mostly happen in India, as their pitches are so dry and flat. So, instead of asking for more fielders, might as well ask the curators to make better cricketing pitches, which will give both bowlers and batsmen a fair chance!

  • on October 30, 2013, 19:11 GMT

    Does captains of every country have any say on the ICC rules. Is there a comprehensive research done before coming up with ridiculous rules.

    They keep switching back and forth on two new balls why? They keep messing with the field restrictions why?

    ICC should focus on popularity, these high scores are making the games boring.

  • on October 30, 2013, 19:02 GMT

    new ODI rule of 4 fielders inside is not good, need to change it back

  • Jonah58 on October 30, 2013, 18:59 GMT

    There is no need to change the rules (again), just prepare some cricket wickets rather than Motorways.

  • on October 30, 2013, 18:57 GMT

    Dhoni, great for speaking out. Hopefully BCCI can use all their powers to make ICC change the rules. Especially for teams full of spinners, the 2 new balls and fewer men outside circle as well as dew (when playing day-night matches) has made bowling tough. I certainly would get bored see 4s and 6s every time...

  • on October 30, 2013, 18:54 GMT

    I hated the new fielding restriction rule as soon as I heard it was being changed. It's a terrible rule, stupid that teams don't have a sweeper at times or men defending down the ground. Please icc change it back to four players inside the circle.

  • Vijay_P_S on October 30, 2013, 18:50 GMT

    Time to standardize the dimensions of the ground too. These 75 m sixes make me cry. They would be easy catches 10 m inside the boundary on a decent ground.

    Suggestion to Cricinfo: Please publish ground dimensions for each match. That would put the score in perspective.

  • sweetspot on October 30, 2013, 18:41 GMT

    As always, MSD is asking the most pertinent questions. This man's contribution to the game will come in more ways than meets the eye readily. He should be taken very seriously, because even though it suits India and its batting heavy team, MSD is absolutely right in raising doubts about the way the game is going as a spectator sport. It will get incredibly insipid very rapidly if some of these new rules that were put in to make it more exciting don't get rolled back. Hammering off 700 runs shouldn't happen with such frightening regularity and no team coming anywhere near being all out. The closer ODIs get to T20, the worse off we will be. T20s have their own charm, but the ODI game has to distinguish itself and do it in a hurry.

  • MAAFEX on October 30, 2013, 18:40 GMT

    I think icc has to go to those old days like 1st 15 overs 2 fielder outside the circle and from new rules a change of ball after 30 overs and should allow 5 fielder outside the 30 yard.

  • on October 30, 2013, 18:34 GMT

    Till ICC realise that bowlers are supposed to do something more than release a cricket ball so anyone holding a bat with average reflexes can hit it out of the ground, best advice for all captains batting first - the old 275 = new 350. If batting first, particularly in India - your batsmen have to bat as if the opposition has already scored 365 / 370. Quick running, swing hard at the ball so you hit whatever is in your range out of the ground (preferably at least once an over). Keep your eyes on the ball, know that the bowler can do nothing beyond releasing the ball & let your bat do the rest....Keep rotating your bowlers match-after-match. Every match, try to ensure that you have at least 1 different bowler from the previous match 11 so there is something different for the opposition to get used to. If your batsmen can't score 325 in 50 overs, look to change the batting line-up. they never had it this good & still can't score at 6.5 - they got to be useless.

  • Cpt.Meanster on October 30, 2013, 18:32 GMT

    There is an old saying; it only hurts when the blade cuts you rather than seeing someone else bleed. Obviously, MSD knows India cannot afford chasing 300+ runs every time. Which means, India's bowling is really pathetic. Add to that, the ICC rules and stuff. BUT hold on there ! ODIs are played in other parts of the world with the same rules. How come we don't see high scores such as these in those games ? The answer is simple - the pitches are not as batsmen friendly as the ones in India. Shouldn't Dhoni be asking the BCCI for sportive pitches instead ? Having said that, I thought BOTH teams bowled poorly throughout this series. So this entire situation is like a double edged sword. The ICC rules don't help as well as the presence of some really ORDINARY bowlers in both teams don't help either. I guess Dhoni should be asking for the ICC to train bowlers as well along with his appeal for altered rules. However, the primary reason here is flat pitches. No use living in self denial.

  • on October 30, 2013, 18:27 GMT

    Here's a suggestion. Start with 2 men outside the circle in first 10 overs, then have 3 for overs 11-20, 4 for overs 21-30, 5 for 31-40 and 6 for 41-50. The middle overs won't get boring and the batsmen will be slogging anyway in the last 10 overs. It would give bowlers some much needed relief

  • on October 30, 2013, 18:27 GMT

    Here's a suggestion. Start with 2 men outside the circle in first 10 overs, then have 3 for overs 11-20, 4 for overs 21-30, 5 for 31-40 and 6 for 41-50. The middle overs won't get boring and the batsmen will be slogging anyway in the last 10 overs. It would give bowlers some much needed relief

  • Cpt.Meanster on October 30, 2013, 18:32 GMT

    There is an old saying; it only hurts when the blade cuts you rather than seeing someone else bleed. Obviously, MSD knows India cannot afford chasing 300+ runs every time. Which means, India's bowling is really pathetic. Add to that, the ICC rules and stuff. BUT hold on there ! ODIs are played in other parts of the world with the same rules. How come we don't see high scores such as these in those games ? The answer is simple - the pitches are not as batsmen friendly as the ones in India. Shouldn't Dhoni be asking the BCCI for sportive pitches instead ? Having said that, I thought BOTH teams bowled poorly throughout this series. So this entire situation is like a double edged sword. The ICC rules don't help as well as the presence of some really ORDINARY bowlers in both teams don't help either. I guess Dhoni should be asking for the ICC to train bowlers as well along with his appeal for altered rules. However, the primary reason here is flat pitches. No use living in self denial.

  • on October 30, 2013, 18:34 GMT

    Till ICC realise that bowlers are supposed to do something more than release a cricket ball so anyone holding a bat with average reflexes can hit it out of the ground, best advice for all captains batting first - the old 275 = new 350. If batting first, particularly in India - your batsmen have to bat as if the opposition has already scored 365 / 370. Quick running, swing hard at the ball so you hit whatever is in your range out of the ground (preferably at least once an over). Keep your eyes on the ball, know that the bowler can do nothing beyond releasing the ball & let your bat do the rest....Keep rotating your bowlers match-after-match. Every match, try to ensure that you have at least 1 different bowler from the previous match 11 so there is something different for the opposition to get used to. If your batsmen can't score 325 in 50 overs, look to change the batting line-up. they never had it this good & still can't score at 6.5 - they got to be useless.

  • MAAFEX on October 30, 2013, 18:40 GMT

    I think icc has to go to those old days like 1st 15 overs 2 fielder outside the circle and from new rules a change of ball after 30 overs and should allow 5 fielder outside the 30 yard.

  • sweetspot on October 30, 2013, 18:41 GMT

    As always, MSD is asking the most pertinent questions. This man's contribution to the game will come in more ways than meets the eye readily. He should be taken very seriously, because even though it suits India and its batting heavy team, MSD is absolutely right in raising doubts about the way the game is going as a spectator sport. It will get incredibly insipid very rapidly if some of these new rules that were put in to make it more exciting don't get rolled back. Hammering off 700 runs shouldn't happen with such frightening regularity and no team coming anywhere near being all out. The closer ODIs get to T20, the worse off we will be. T20s have their own charm, but the ODI game has to distinguish itself and do it in a hurry.

  • Vijay_P_S on October 30, 2013, 18:50 GMT

    Time to standardize the dimensions of the ground too. These 75 m sixes make me cry. They would be easy catches 10 m inside the boundary on a decent ground.

    Suggestion to Cricinfo: Please publish ground dimensions for each match. That would put the score in perspective.

  • on October 30, 2013, 18:54 GMT

    I hated the new fielding restriction rule as soon as I heard it was being changed. It's a terrible rule, stupid that teams don't have a sweeper at times or men defending down the ground. Please icc change it back to four players inside the circle.

  • on October 30, 2013, 18:57 GMT

    Dhoni, great for speaking out. Hopefully BCCI can use all their powers to make ICC change the rules. Especially for teams full of spinners, the 2 new balls and fewer men outside circle as well as dew (when playing day-night matches) has made bowling tough. I certainly would get bored see 4s and 6s every time...

  • Jonah58 on October 30, 2013, 18:59 GMT

    There is no need to change the rules (again), just prepare some cricket wickets rather than Motorways.

  • on October 30, 2013, 19:02 GMT

    new ODI rule of 4 fielders inside is not good, need to change it back