India v Australia, 2nd Test, Hyderabad, 4th day March 5, 2013

Hayden helps struggling batsmen

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Few Australian batsmen are more qualified to give advice on scoring runs in India than Matthew Hayden and Michael Clarke, and the two men were locked in intense discussions out on the field after the end of the Hyderabad Test. Following the Chennai defeat, Clarke enlisted the help of Shane Warne to speak to the spin-bowling group and a similar scenario played out with Hayden in Hyderabad, as the Australians practised at a time when the second session should have been under way.

A makeshift net was set up around the Test-match pitch and the batsmen rotated through a centre-wicket batting session against the spinners and the two left-arm fast bowlers, Mitchell Johnson and Mitchell Starc. While the coach Mickey Arthur and his assistant Steve Rixon watched from behind the batsman, Hayden, the batting coach Michael di Venuto and a padded-up Clarke stood to the side. They spoke between themselves and to whichever batsmen weren't in at the time, Hayden demonstrating stances and footwork during his hour-long stay.

Hayden is the only Australian who has scored more Test runs in India than Clarke's 954; his 1027 runs came at an average of 51.35 across three tours from 2001 to 2008. He entered the first tour desperately in need of some big scores to secure his place as a Test opener and he responded with 119, 28 not out, 97, 67, 203 and 35. Much of his success against spin came because he employed the sweep shot to great effect.

England's batsmen also swept well during their series victory in India late last year, but when David Warner and Phillip Hughes tried the shot against R Ashwin coming over the wicket on the third day in Hyderabad, both were bowled around their legs. Hayden, who is in India commentating on the series, said on Star Sports before the fourth day's play that Warner had fallen into the trap of sweeping a ball that was too full, meaning his stumps were vulnerable.

"The line was good to sweep. The length, though, was questionable," Hayden said. "We saw with Davey Warner that was a very full length and even though I loved to sweep the very first instinct I had in my mind was actually about whether the ball was full or not. In fact I'm sure bat-pad thought I was crazy, because as soon as I saw any width I'd yell out the word 'full' and that would get my feet moving into that position.

"The ball that we saw Hughes get out on was actually the perfect length to sweep. But what is the perfect length? Because if you're short or tall, your perfect lengths vary. That's a very personal thing. And for me the whole bat-pad routine, you're not really worried about a bat-pad if you're looking to play aggressively. They only come into play when you're feeling a little tentative or your footwork is slow and the ball is turning. You need the aggressive options.

"That's exactly why you want to either get the ball on the full to cover the spin, and also sweep on line and when the offspinner is coming around the wicket, you can't be out lbw. It's always got to be outside the line of leg stump."

The Australians batted for more than an hour and a half on the Hyderabad pitch after their innings defeat, trying out different strategies and shots. Hughes advanced to a few deliveries, which he had been reluctant to against Ashwin during the two Tests, but there remained plenty of work for all of the batsmen ahead of the third Test, which starts in Mohali on Thursday next week.

Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY bobmartin on | March 6, 2013, 12:16 GMT

    How long have Australia known they were touring India ? How much notice did they take of England's recent success ? Here they are after two defeats suddenly talking about playing spin.. I thought everyone knew, you take decent spinners and decent players of spin to India.. They call it preparation.. Australia have without a shadow of a doubt proved the truth of the old saying: Fail to prepare - prepare to fail

  • POSTED BY ramli on | March 6, 2013, 12:05 GMT

    Fleming_Mitch ... it is to the same team that you lost in your own den that India lost in its ... may be England is the superior team ... current aus team is the worst to tour India ...

  • POSTED BY Thefakebook on | March 6, 2013, 11:18 GMT

    Now hopefully something good can come out of this, Hayden and Clarke will improve this batting hope for 2-2 now.OzOzOZOIOiOi

  • POSTED BY Harmony111 on | March 6, 2013, 8:52 GMT

    @chin-music: Oh Really? To me it clearly means that Clarke has no idea what to do. On the other hand MSD's statements clearly showed he knew WHAT was wrong WHERE. It would be a foolish man who would not say it was the wicket that had rendered his fast bowlers toothless. It would be a foolish man who would not say that it was the pressure of scoring runs vs the spinners that was causing his batsmen to fail. Some ppl think think that enumerating the various causes of the loss equate to offering excuses. No where did MSD ever say anything that can be seen as an excuse. An excuse is when a batsman says that he was unlucky to get out when in fact he had clearly nicked the ball. An excuse would be if MSD says that the conditions were not good for swing when in fact it was cloudy the whole day. Clarke at the moment has ZERO idea how to move forward, may be he doesn't even know what is wrong with the team else he'd not have dropped Lyon.

    High time some ppl became less Over-Neutral.

  • POSTED BY Behind_the_bowlers_arm on | March 6, 2013, 8:43 GMT

    This current situation of coaches and advisors and dvd analysis seems to have bred a bunch of cricketers who need to be told what to do and how to perform. Firstly this advice from a left hander who had success in India should have been organised a month ago and secondly players like Hughes, Warner etc should have been seeking it themselves. Khawaja should have been in the team for the last year and a proper promising (right hand) batsmen like Doolan should have been brought on this tour instead of one of the bits and pieces cricketers like Smith.

  • POSTED BY on | March 6, 2013, 8:37 GMT

    Now steven smith being considered for a test match. Aussies are just gunning for fitness and attitude and not skills. Got selection all wrong.

  • POSTED BY chin-music on | March 6, 2013, 7:25 GMT

    @in-dipper : As an Indian, I've got to agree with you. While Aussie results on this tour are a mirror image of India's during their 4-0 horror show - the Indian team can learn something from the attitude that the Aus team is showing even in its darkest moment. I have not heard Clarke bleating about pitch/umpire/injury/bad luck etc , just simply accepting that he was outplayed - & most importantly , then getting straight into the nets or trying whatever is needed to claw back ( unlike India with their "if we holiday & close our eyes, this horror seies will magically turnaround by the time we open them" attitude.

  • POSTED BY KhanMitch on | March 6, 2013, 2:58 GMT

    These losses for us wouldn't be so incredibly soul destroying if we were losing to a great team. But we are being crushed by a good Indian team that lost to England, and that just makes our meek capitulation so sad. I fear that the Ashes series, both home and away, are shaping up to be a massacre. We might jag a test or two in the home series, but does anyone seriously think the current team is even close to the standard that the soap-dodgers thumped here a few seasons back? Some important changes must include bringing in Khawaja at 3, move Watson back to opening, get either of Holland or Haurtiz back as spinners and get Cummins fit again. Pattinson, Cummins, and Starc are our future bowling attakc. Reading many perceptive and unfortunately accurately predictive blog comments over recent years, while simultaneously watching CA's ham-fisted, money-grabbing approach to scheduling, reminds me of a certan fiddle-playing Roman emperor.

  • POSTED BY Barnesy4444 on | March 6, 2013, 1:59 GMT

    Why is a man who never even played test cricket Australia's batting coach? What does he know about facing test bowling at all let alone in India? Is that a problem I wonder?

  • POSTED BY in-dipper on | March 6, 2013, 0:06 GMT

    Although Australia are not in the same league playing India in India, I am impressed with their work rate. At no stage during either tests have they push the fielders delaying the declaration and training straight after the game is another sign of their strive to win. You can't fault their attitude, its just that they don't have the quality of players for the conditions to put on the park. I remember another team after they were badly beaten in Australia going on holidays the day after the test.

  • POSTED BY bobmartin on | March 6, 2013, 12:16 GMT

    How long have Australia known they were touring India ? How much notice did they take of England's recent success ? Here they are after two defeats suddenly talking about playing spin.. I thought everyone knew, you take decent spinners and decent players of spin to India.. They call it preparation.. Australia have without a shadow of a doubt proved the truth of the old saying: Fail to prepare - prepare to fail

  • POSTED BY ramli on | March 6, 2013, 12:05 GMT

    Fleming_Mitch ... it is to the same team that you lost in your own den that India lost in its ... may be England is the superior team ... current aus team is the worst to tour India ...

  • POSTED BY Thefakebook on | March 6, 2013, 11:18 GMT

    Now hopefully something good can come out of this, Hayden and Clarke will improve this batting hope for 2-2 now.OzOzOZOIOiOi

  • POSTED BY Harmony111 on | March 6, 2013, 8:52 GMT

    @chin-music: Oh Really? To me it clearly means that Clarke has no idea what to do. On the other hand MSD's statements clearly showed he knew WHAT was wrong WHERE. It would be a foolish man who would not say it was the wicket that had rendered his fast bowlers toothless. It would be a foolish man who would not say that it was the pressure of scoring runs vs the spinners that was causing his batsmen to fail. Some ppl think think that enumerating the various causes of the loss equate to offering excuses. No where did MSD ever say anything that can be seen as an excuse. An excuse is when a batsman says that he was unlucky to get out when in fact he had clearly nicked the ball. An excuse would be if MSD says that the conditions were not good for swing when in fact it was cloudy the whole day. Clarke at the moment has ZERO idea how to move forward, may be he doesn't even know what is wrong with the team else he'd not have dropped Lyon.

    High time some ppl became less Over-Neutral.

  • POSTED BY Behind_the_bowlers_arm on | March 6, 2013, 8:43 GMT

    This current situation of coaches and advisors and dvd analysis seems to have bred a bunch of cricketers who need to be told what to do and how to perform. Firstly this advice from a left hander who had success in India should have been organised a month ago and secondly players like Hughes, Warner etc should have been seeking it themselves. Khawaja should have been in the team for the last year and a proper promising (right hand) batsmen like Doolan should have been brought on this tour instead of one of the bits and pieces cricketers like Smith.

  • POSTED BY on | March 6, 2013, 8:37 GMT

    Now steven smith being considered for a test match. Aussies are just gunning for fitness and attitude and not skills. Got selection all wrong.

  • POSTED BY chin-music on | March 6, 2013, 7:25 GMT

    @in-dipper : As an Indian, I've got to agree with you. While Aussie results on this tour are a mirror image of India's during their 4-0 horror show - the Indian team can learn something from the attitude that the Aus team is showing even in its darkest moment. I have not heard Clarke bleating about pitch/umpire/injury/bad luck etc , just simply accepting that he was outplayed - & most importantly , then getting straight into the nets or trying whatever is needed to claw back ( unlike India with their "if we holiday & close our eyes, this horror seies will magically turnaround by the time we open them" attitude.

  • POSTED BY KhanMitch on | March 6, 2013, 2:58 GMT

    These losses for us wouldn't be so incredibly soul destroying if we were losing to a great team. But we are being crushed by a good Indian team that lost to England, and that just makes our meek capitulation so sad. I fear that the Ashes series, both home and away, are shaping up to be a massacre. We might jag a test or two in the home series, but does anyone seriously think the current team is even close to the standard that the soap-dodgers thumped here a few seasons back? Some important changes must include bringing in Khawaja at 3, move Watson back to opening, get either of Holland or Haurtiz back as spinners and get Cummins fit again. Pattinson, Cummins, and Starc are our future bowling attakc. Reading many perceptive and unfortunately accurately predictive blog comments over recent years, while simultaneously watching CA's ham-fisted, money-grabbing approach to scheduling, reminds me of a certan fiddle-playing Roman emperor.

  • POSTED BY Barnesy4444 on | March 6, 2013, 1:59 GMT

    Why is a man who never even played test cricket Australia's batting coach? What does he know about facing test bowling at all let alone in India? Is that a problem I wonder?

  • POSTED BY in-dipper on | March 6, 2013, 0:06 GMT

    Although Australia are not in the same league playing India in India, I am impressed with their work rate. At no stage during either tests have they push the fielders delaying the declaration and training straight after the game is another sign of their strive to win. You can't fault their attitude, its just that they don't have the quality of players for the conditions to put on the park. I remember another team after they were badly beaten in Australia going on holidays the day after the test.

  • POSTED BY SalMonMariner on | March 5, 2013, 23:21 GMT

    The Aussies missing Michael Hussey more than anyone else - the future is one thing but it is always best that your best current players are those who should be the playing XI - veterans like Chris Rogers, David Hussey and especially Brad Hodge should be seriously considered - Phil Hughes out of his depth against spinners - on the Indian side - if Jaffer is the best available at this moment he should be the one to replace Sehwag, and for God's sake play Ojha over Bhajji.

  • POSTED BY Beertjie on | March 5, 2013, 23:02 GMT

    The mantra has to be Use Your Feet if you can. If not, Learn to Sweep!

  • POSTED BY blink182alex on | March 5, 2013, 22:46 GMT

    Rogers has 3 tons at 55 in the Shield this season. Add to that the thousands of runs he has amassed in English conditions he should be in there. He knows his game and has a tight technique, he may not destroy England but i'm sure he would do a job at number 3, he would only be a short term option but i bet if you ask Anderson and Finn who they would rather bowl at Rogers, Cowan or Hughes the last name they would say would be Rogers.

  • POSTED BY Peterincanada on | March 5, 2013, 21:56 GMT

    I well remember Hayden's first tour when he finally, after debuting in 1993, cemented his place. I am not sure if the present crop can emulate his methods as he was somewhat unorthodox. Clarke's method might be the safer option but it requires confident footwork. In any event one of those options should be tried as the Indian spinners have totally dominated.

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 20:39 GMT

    Just to remind, in both the tests Aussies get to bat in the first day and they still capitulated to spin. Mohali would be their best bet to bounce back and batting first would be the key again. If the bat second, I am not sure how bad can they do.

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 19:47 GMT

    The Aussies have played like 20 sweep shots in this series so far and probably half of them have resulted in dismissals. Should we be encouraging them to play more? This masterclass needed to come a long time ago and these guys needed to perfect it through other means than trying it out at test level. Better to do this work on A tours of the subcontinent and training camps etc. Funny they had their spin camp to prepare for the T20 WC but not for a four match test series in India. It´s frustrating that there is no longer time and opportunity in the cricket calender to adequately prepare for such big series.

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 19:38 GMT

    @Blink182Alex. Hussey and Voges have been terrible in shield cricket this season. Rogers, by all mean, pick him, but the other guys, no way. Bailey has done nothing at shield level either. Yes, we need another experienced man at the top and in the middle too, but they should be in form when picked, not just on record alone.

  • POSTED BY getgopi on | March 5, 2013, 19:25 GMT

    Yes, but Tendulkar and Gavaskar are much lighter batsmen and moving around the crease quickly comes easily to them. The bigger Aussie batsmen struggle when they seem to stand around lead-footed in the crease. However, some of their batting -- Watson in first innings, Cowan in second innings -- seemed more positive and brought more runs when they moved their feet quickly to spin and didn't attempt to sweep. And that's what they need to do: keep eye on ball, stay light on their feet and pick out singles while putting the sweep shot off until they are settled in. I am just surprised that they are not applying this.

  • POSTED BY blink182alex on | March 5, 2013, 18:42 GMT

    The only hope i have is that the selectors wake up and dump some of the batsmen here that are not good enough and select guys back in Australia who have piled on the runs in first class cricket for years, hopefully that will be enough for us to put on scores like 350 against England, which in conditions that will suit our quicks will make us competitive.

    Rogers, Voges, Dave Husse, Khawaja and maybe even Bailey if he does well for Hampshire could be in contention for the numbers 3,5 and 6. Watson and Warner to open, Clarke at 4, Wade at 7.

  • POSTED BY Great_Nate on | March 5, 2013, 18:40 GMT

    Long reach is needed to succeed in India huh? I guess that helped Tendulkar and Gavaskar score so many runs in India!

  • POSTED BY ChuckyDoll on | March 5, 2013, 18:34 GMT

    Just put Haydos in one game (honorary batsman) and see.

  • POSTED BY phunny_game on | March 5, 2013, 17:49 GMT

    Well, if Aussie batsman can make big scores in the next match, haydos might become the next batting coach...

    But i think batting is instinctive, no one can suddenly jump out of the crease to spinners as we saw in philip hughes, or even ed cowan... Hayden used to step out to fast bowlers also... I am sure he can't teach that to every batsman :D

  • POSTED BY Mycroft on | March 5, 2013, 17:40 GMT

    I hope Hayden makes more sense to the batters in person than he does in print or when he has a microphone in front of him. Fantastic batsman with a lot of expertise to pass on but needs to work on those vocals.

  • POSTED BY CricketMaan on | March 5, 2013, 17:16 GMT

    If Mohali pitch spices up then we could have a game on hand. Who knows India will win toss and have to face Mitch, Pattinson in the first session and that could ring bells!!!!

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 16:13 GMT

    aussies desparately need simon katich,shaun marsh,camerron white here,becoz all of them were familiar with indian conditions and competent against spin too

  • POSTED BY ImpartialExpert on | March 5, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    I think Hayden was successful in India because of his long reach. Tall batsmen even if they dont dance down the track can be successful against spin if they use long strides during defence. That's what Cook did and many other tall batsmen did against Indian spin. Basically it upsets the length of the spinners the same way batsmen dancing down the track does with a lesser risk.

  • POSTED BY gsingh7 on | March 5, 2013, 15:39 GMT

    no amount of help wud infuse talent of playing spin . they need to prepare rank turners back home or be prepared to get similar whitewashes on foreign soils. fast bouncy pitches (not green tops) wud only mean u cant play spin on them as bowl dont turn and bounce like in india. warne was a beast in aus but was a minnow in india. he cud tell better.

  • POSTED BY rajpan on | March 5, 2013, 15:35 GMT

    Is anybody allowed to practise on the centre strip anywhere else in the world - even after the match is over? I doubt !!

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 15:31 GMT

    interim 11 would be cowan-watson, Khwaja, clarke,Wade@5, maxwell@6,steve smith@7,jhonson@8, pattinson,starc, lyon@ 11

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 15:11 GMT

    There is no magic formula for success. Can you think of two player more different than Matt Hayden and Graham Thorpe? Yet both had success against high quality spin bowling in alien conditions with their totally different styles of play.

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 15:06 GMT

    get in chris rogers, doolan, fergusson and cosgrove instead of limited overs specilaists like watson, warner,hughes and henriques.aussies sending in 17 member squad is just adding to the problem where they chop one and bring in a new guy and he fails to deliver. select a strong 15. Doolan -Cowan as openers, cosgrove @3, khwaja@4, clarke @5,fergusson@6 , wade @7, keefe@8, pattinson, starc and hazelwood@11.

  • POSTED BY Cricket_Man on | March 5, 2013, 14:59 GMT

    The Australians have been famous for their mental toughness but I believe the current Aussie group lacks it. This is reflected in their lack of footwork, lack of aggression and lack of self-belief. They need someone like Michael Bevan or Darren Lehman as their coach. I think Henriques tackled spin really well in the first test. He should be promoted at number 5. This is my Aussie lineup for the third test 1) Warner 2) Cowan 3) Clarke 4) Hughes 5) Henriques 6) Watson 7) Wade 8) Siddle 9) Pattinson 10) Doherty 11) Lyon. It's just Maxwell sitting out for Lyon but I think the changed batting order can make a difference. No need to bring in Khawaja. Because now, after playing 2 tests, Hughes will have an idea what to do. Khawaja will take atleast 1 test to get used to the conditions and that would be too late.

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 14:46 GMT

    In cricket one is guided by instinct as well as technique. What is appropriate for Heyden may not be good for other batsman. So it is better to play one's natural game to overcome the bad patch.

  • POSTED BY Tumbarumbar on | March 5, 2013, 14:40 GMT

    @rohan34, you're hard to please. 'Clarke is past his golden year of 2012'. A 130 in the 1st test and a 91 in the 2nd test. Out in the second innings of both games to balls that Bradman wouldn't have laid a bat on, you don't often get hit ankle high by a long hop pitched half a meter outside off stump (first test) and as far as the ball that got him in the second innings of the second test goes, well if Jadeja could cut out that patch of pitch and take it everywhere he bowled he would be a happy bowler.

  • POSTED BY ajetti on | March 5, 2013, 14:32 GMT

    Phil Hughes will probably not play another test for Australia. If he does then that will confirm how low cricket Australia has sunk after a golden period. People don't value dour players like Cowan because they put you to sleep. Simon Katich was the same and his lack of flair made him a victim to the vagaries of selection. I felt that was a big mistake-dropping Katich. Players like him and Cowan will grind it out. Although Cowan is yet to make a big score he has shown the gumption to tough it out by hanging in there patiently unlike Hughes who appears desperate. And he IS desperate. Shane Watson has always been blow hot/blow cold. Not really sure about dropping him. Sometimes an extended run might pay off with such a character. Warner stays because he is in Sehwag's mould. He can single handedly win the next test for Australia. Maxwell is like last year's version of Jadeja - needs more time to fit in. Wade - limited talent and hence limited expectations. India 4-0!

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 13:58 GMT

    If the Aussies are not comfortable sweeping and keep getting out attempting it,they should try other options.Accepted that it's has brought lots of batters great success in the past.But one can't get carried away with precedence.It's important they don't start imitating Haydos and his styles.Every player is different and has his own points of strengths and weaknesses.It's important that they trust their natural game,and try to adapt to the challenges around it.Cook was the rock around which the recent English success in India was delivered and he hardly scored off the spinners outside his comfort zone-short,too full.KP used all the tricks that he carries along-stepping out,sweeping,reverse sweeping. There's also the small matter of the bowling being good/bad on the day.You have to be patient against Indian spinners on their good days,and absorb the tons of pressure they apply.Will be a huge test of skills,and mental strength.Hope the Aussies can find it all in quick time.

  • POSTED BY Al_Bundy1 on | March 5, 2013, 13:21 GMT

    Australians need to play their best bowlers - Doherty and Lyon as spinners and Mitchell Johnson and Pattinson as pacers. Henriques can be the 5th bowler.

  • POSTED BY bradmannn on | March 5, 2013, 13:16 GMT

    This is great by haydos, but why there is more sentiment for aussie batters from indian writers and pundits while they are down at 2-0 at this stage, whether sunny gavaskar and ravi shastri had helped indian players in nets how to play in england and australia when they are white washed 4-0 in england and australia . that too included a strong team of sachin, gambir,vvs,dravid,dhoni,sehwag, zaheer during that 8-0 whitewash, now everybody talking that india is a great team , till two games left wait and watch. Even it was 3-0 victory , it was a shame for indian team because aussies take that , they defeated a strong indian team back at home 4-0

  • POSTED BY cm.rox on | March 5, 2013, 13:01 GMT

    i hear it allaround .. australians are inexperienced , only 4 have played before all that kind of stuff then why not go for an experienced person in johnson .. i dont understand the theory of the australians .. he bowled quite well in recent past clocking 140+ and he can obviously at better.. even though maxwell is called batsmen i dont see it in him... drop maxwell and it must be johnson instead of him

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 12:56 GMT

    The decision to take the minimum number of players on such an arduous tour is now seen to be folly. Only Khwaja is an option, and that is with Wade batting too high at number six, and he is yet another left hander to leave Indian spinners licking their lips. Walson and Hughes look horribly out of form, Cowan rarely looks in form even though he will battle forever, and Warner can break the hearts of any bowling attack with his aggression but also the hearts of his teammates with yet another injudicious stroke...Haddin, as a second wicket keeper, test batsman and experienced senior pro, would have been the ideal player to have in the squad.

  • POSTED BY AngryAngy on | March 5, 2013, 12:41 GMT

    That's really quality free batting advice. The sweep is a amazing shot when used well; from Hayden's mighty slogs to Tendulkar's deft paddle past fine leg, it has a wide range of manifestations and the applications vary from milking a good spell to moving the bowler's field into prone position for your a-game. However, if you play it badly, it will get you out with amazing consistency.

  • POSTED BY rohan34mca on | March 5, 2013, 12:36 GMT

    Evidently Indian spinners have always struggled against tall top order batsmen. Reason - they smother the turn by extending their reach in front foot play & when it is slightly short they use the depth of crease to great effect. It is as simple as that. Current Australian lot - They don't have one batsman who is in form. Clarke is past his golden year 2012. Openers are struggling, Shane Watson is struggling, Hughes is Mr come & go. Wade is no good in these pitches. They could put some pressure if they had good seamers, Alas apart from Pattison no one looks threatening. Still I feel in Mohali, they can turn the tables around. Reason - That pitch is never a rank turner & weather conditions will favor seamers.

  • POSTED BY Matt. on | March 5, 2013, 12:34 GMT

    How many times are we going to give Hughes a chance? No matter how many runs he scores domestically, it should be obvious his game just does not translate to the international level

  • POSTED BY venkatesh018 on | March 5, 2013, 12:28 GMT

    Looks like Aussie players and backroom staff can't be faulted for their efforts but as Manjrekar pointed out in commentary it is a huge mismatch of skills in the bastsmen of both teams when it comes to batting on turning wickets.

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 12:26 GMT

    They got the right guy to coach them. Rem it was Gooch who was the batting coach for England on their tour and he had swept England to finals in the 1987 WC. it is now upto the team to apply themselves in practice as well as execute what they learn and practice in the real match situation,

  • POSTED BY Mary_786 on | March 5, 2013, 12:23 GMT

    Great when legends of the game take time out to help the team, also noticed that Hayden was pushing for Khawaja to be included in the top 6 which is good to hear. If only Warne could spend more time with our spinners as they could with some advice from the legend.

  • POSTED BY 30-30-150 on | March 5, 2013, 12:07 GMT

    I bet he'd still do a better job with the bat than the current bunch of Australian openers. What a batsman. Miss him.

  • POSTED BY Paul_Rampley on | March 5, 2013, 12:03 GMT

    Mr.Wasimm my understanding is that Watson is going home for the third test so Khawaja should come in and desrevingly so as I think he will be a very important batsman for us in the ashes. As for Hughes i am still a fan and i think he can sort through his issues but no doubt there is pressure on our top order. I am really glad to see Hayden spend time with the left handers in the team, he is a legend of the game.

  • POSTED BY Md.Wasimmmmmmmmm on | March 5, 2013, 11:32 GMT

    Drop Hughes and bring Ushman Khwaja

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  • POSTED BY Md.Wasimmmmmmmmm on | March 5, 2013, 11:32 GMT

    Drop Hughes and bring Ushman Khwaja

  • POSTED BY Paul_Rampley on | March 5, 2013, 12:03 GMT

    Mr.Wasimm my understanding is that Watson is going home for the third test so Khawaja should come in and desrevingly so as I think he will be a very important batsman for us in the ashes. As for Hughes i am still a fan and i think he can sort through his issues but no doubt there is pressure on our top order. I am really glad to see Hayden spend time with the left handers in the team, he is a legend of the game.

  • POSTED BY 30-30-150 on | March 5, 2013, 12:07 GMT

    I bet he'd still do a better job with the bat than the current bunch of Australian openers. What a batsman. Miss him.

  • POSTED BY Mary_786 on | March 5, 2013, 12:23 GMT

    Great when legends of the game take time out to help the team, also noticed that Hayden was pushing for Khawaja to be included in the top 6 which is good to hear. If only Warne could spend more time with our spinners as they could with some advice from the legend.

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 12:26 GMT

    They got the right guy to coach them. Rem it was Gooch who was the batting coach for England on their tour and he had swept England to finals in the 1987 WC. it is now upto the team to apply themselves in practice as well as execute what they learn and practice in the real match situation,

  • POSTED BY venkatesh018 on | March 5, 2013, 12:28 GMT

    Looks like Aussie players and backroom staff can't be faulted for their efforts but as Manjrekar pointed out in commentary it is a huge mismatch of skills in the bastsmen of both teams when it comes to batting on turning wickets.

  • POSTED BY Matt. on | March 5, 2013, 12:34 GMT

    How many times are we going to give Hughes a chance? No matter how many runs he scores domestically, it should be obvious his game just does not translate to the international level

  • POSTED BY rohan34mca on | March 5, 2013, 12:36 GMT

    Evidently Indian spinners have always struggled against tall top order batsmen. Reason - they smother the turn by extending their reach in front foot play & when it is slightly short they use the depth of crease to great effect. It is as simple as that. Current Australian lot - They don't have one batsman who is in form. Clarke is past his golden year 2012. Openers are struggling, Shane Watson is struggling, Hughes is Mr come & go. Wade is no good in these pitches. They could put some pressure if they had good seamers, Alas apart from Pattison no one looks threatening. Still I feel in Mohali, they can turn the tables around. Reason - That pitch is never a rank turner & weather conditions will favor seamers.

  • POSTED BY AngryAngy on | March 5, 2013, 12:41 GMT

    That's really quality free batting advice. The sweep is a amazing shot when used well; from Hayden's mighty slogs to Tendulkar's deft paddle past fine leg, it has a wide range of manifestations and the applications vary from milking a good spell to moving the bowler's field into prone position for your a-game. However, if you play it badly, it will get you out with amazing consistency.

  • POSTED BY on | March 5, 2013, 12:56 GMT

    The decision to take the minimum number of players on such an arduous tour is now seen to be folly. Only Khwaja is an option, and that is with Wade batting too high at number six, and he is yet another left hander to leave Indian spinners licking their lips. Walson and Hughes look horribly out of form, Cowan rarely looks in form even though he will battle forever, and Warner can break the hearts of any bowling attack with his aggression but also the hearts of his teammates with yet another injudicious stroke...Haddin, as a second wicket keeper, test batsman and experienced senior pro, would have been the ideal player to have in the squad.