IPL 2013 stats review May 27, 2013

Super Kings dominate the numbers

A look at the season-wise comparisons, team-wise stats, and the best batsmen and bowlers in the Powerplay, middle, and slog overs

Click here to view the overall stats and records from IPL 2013.

IPL 2013 started slowly in terms of run-scoring, but by the end it picked up sufficiently so that the overall numbers are pretty similar to what was achieved in the last few years. The run-rate picked up and ended at 7.67, only about two percent lower than last season's rate, while the number of 50-plus scores was only one short of last season's aggregate. The sixes count went down from 731 to 674 - a fall of 57 - but there were 140 more fours this time than last year. There were only four 200-plus scores this time, though, the least in an IPL season in India. This was also a season of minimal weather interruptions: only one match was played with a reduced number of overs, while none was washed out, unlike what had happened in the last two seasons.

It was noticeable that teams didn't bank so heavily on the Powerplay overs this time, choosing instead to wait for the last few overs to make their move. That's reflected in the run rates as well: for the first time in six IPL seasons, the average Powerplay run rate dropped to less than seven runs per over - it was 6.93, compared to 7.22 last year. The scoring rate in the middle overs wasn't too high either, but in the last five the rate increased to 9.57, which is the rate achieved in 2010, when the overall tournament run rate was 8.12. For teams batting first, the scoring rate in the last five was 10.16, well clear of last year's 9.68 and 2011's 9.36.

The bowling was a mixed bag in 2013, and while there were some stand-out fast-bowling performances by Dale Steyn, Mitchell Johnson, James Faulkner and Lasith Malinga, among several others, overall spinners did better: they were more economical while averaging around the same. However, they bowled fewer overs than they had in the previous two seasons: compared to 1039.2 overs in 2011 and 1019.4 overs in 2012, spinners bowled only 856 overs in 2013.

The main difference in the contribution from spinners was in the Powerplay overs. In the 2011 IPL, following on the success of spin with the new ball in the World Cup, they 1199 deliveries during the Powerplays, and next year it went up to 1266; this time, though, it came down to 902 balls.

Overall stats in each IPL season
Season Matches Runs per wkt Runs per over 100s/ 50s 4s/ 6s 200+ scores
2008 58 26.03 8.30 6/ 83 1702/ 622 11
2009 57 23.41 7.48 2/ 68 1316/ 506 1
2010 60 26.20 8.12 4/ 88 1709/ 585 9
2011 73 26.01 7.72 6/ 89 1913/ 639 5
2012 75 26.19 7.82 6/ 96 1911/ 731 5
2013 76 24.79 7.67 4/ 97 2051/ 674 4
Spread of runs and wickets in each IPL season
  Powerplay overs 6.1 to 15 Last 5 overs
Season Average Run rate Average Run rate Average Run rate
2008 30.44 7.70 30.55 7.98 18.09 9.94
2009 26.37 7.22 26.94 6.85 17.67 9.13
2010 32.28 7.89 28.27 7.56 19.71 9.58
2011 29.82 7.20 30.86 7.44 18.28 9.10
2012 32.71 7.22 30.39 7.39 18.44 9.52
2013 29.40 6.93 28.82 7.23 18.15 9.57
Pace and spin stats in each IPL season
  Pace Spin
Season Wickets Average Econ rate Wickets Average Econ rate
2008 467 28.42 8.05 134 30.38 8.18
2009 388 26.25 7.65 226 24.77 6.77
2010 405 29.64 8.32 210 28.80 7.34
2011 470 28.12 7.80 268 27.60 7.11
2012 531 27.19 7.81 241 31.35 7.41
2013 604 26.78 7.78 225 26.17 6.88

Team-wise stats

When a tournament has such a long league stage with each team playing 16 games, it isn't necessary that the title winners are actually the side with the most wins over the entire tournament. However, this year Mumbai Indians, the champions, had a better win-loss ratio over the entire tournament than any other side. Coming into the final, they had a poorer win-loss ratio - 12 wins, 6 defeats - than their opponents in the final, Chennai Super Kings, who had a 12-5 record. However, the result in the final meant Mumbai Indians finished with a 13-6 record, while Super kings dropped to 12-6. Super Kings, though, had the better numbers than Mumbai Indians in each of the four key stats - batting average, run rate, bowling average and economy rate.

Rajasthan Royals, who finished third, also had the third-best win-loss ratio, while Sunrisers Hyderabad, the fourth team to make the play-offs, were the only side among the top six with a poorer run-rate than economy rate.

How each team fared in IPL 2013
Team Matches Won/ lost Bat ave Run rate Bowl ave Econ rate
Mumbai Indians 19 13/ 6 26.32 7.95 23.02 7.68
Chennai Super Kings 18 12/ 6 30.86 8.19 21.15 7.62
Rajasthan Royals 18 11/ 7 28.77 7.73 23.45 7.51
Sunrisers Hyderabad 17 10/ 7 21.47 6.98 21.28 7.07
Royal Challengers Bangalore 16 9/ 7 32.96 8.54 23.79 8.09
Kings XI Punjab 16 8/ 8 23.34 7.98 29.47 7.74
Kolkata Knight Riders 16 6/ 10 22.45 7.36 23.87 7.40
Pune Warriors 16 4/ 12 20.37 7.15 30.34 8.10
Delhi Daredevils 16 3/ 13 20.30 7.17 32.05 7.94

The Powerplay stars

Super Kings had a solid top-order star in Michael Hussey throughout the tournament, and he was a huge factor in the team getting off to fine starts in most of their matches. Hussey's consistency was outstanding: in only four out of 17 innings did he score less than 20, though one of them was unfortunately in the final. Hussey scored six fifties in the tournament, and all of them were in wins. In the 12 matches that Super Kings won, Hussey averaged 71.55 at a strike rate of 137; in the five games he played in which Super Kings lost, he averaged just 17.80, at a strike rate of 93.

Hussey was the leading run-scorer in the Powerplay overs, while his scoring rate was a steady seven per over. Among the others in this list are Chris Gayle, Gautam Gambhir, Rahul Dravid, and both the regular openers from Pune Warriors, Aaron Finch and Robin Uthappa. Dravid had a high average, but he also played out plenty of dots during the Powerplay overs.

Among the bowlers, Mitchell Johnson and Mohit Sharma were the stand-out names in the Powerplay overs. Both took 15 or more wickets at excellent economy rates. James Faulkner, Bhuvneshwar Kumar and Praveen Kumar all had superb economy rates as well.

Top run-scorers in the Powerplay overs
Batsman Innings Runs Average Strike rate 4s/ 6s Dot-ball %
Michael Hussey 17 307 76.75 7.03 44/ 4 48.09
Robin Uthappa 16 279 34.87 6.94 30/ 6 43.98
Chris Gayle 16 273 45.50 8.02 28/ 17 51.96
Gautam Gambhir 15 267 38.14 7.77 39/ 3 43.20
Aaron Finch 14 238 34.00 7.80 36/ 6 50.82
Rahul Dravid 15 232 77.33 6.24 44/ 1 61.43
Leading wicket-takers in the Powerplay overs
Bowler Balls bowled Wickets Average Econ rate Dot-ball %
Mitchell Johnson 234 16 14.75 6.05 58.97
Mohit Sharma 216 15 15.26 6.36 57.87
Ishant Sharma 228 9 30.44 7.21 53.51
Bhuvneshwar Kumar 204 8 23.00 5.41 65.20
James Faulkner 150 7 20.42 5.72 58.00
Praveen Kumar 222 7 28.71 5.43 59.01

Best in the middle overs

Hussey was a prominent name in the middle overs too, scoring the second-highest number of runs, and he was often joined during this period by Suresh Raina, who has excellent stats too. These two have the lowest dot-ball percentage among the eight batsmen in the list below, and more often than not ensured that Super Kings had a fine launching pad for the final overs. Virat Kohli and Chris Gayle did a similar job for Royal Challengers, scoring plenty of runs and scoring them quickly. Mumbai Indians have a couple of names in the list too, but Dinesh Karthik got out plenty of times in the middle overs, and Rohit Sharma's scoring rate during this period was relatively low. David Miller had outstanding stats too for Kings XI Punjab.

Harbhajan Singh was by far the leading wicket-taker during this period, with 19 at an economy rate of 6.01, while Amit Mishra had a fantastic economy rate of 5.53. The top two wicket-takers in the middle overs were both spinners from Mumbai Indians - Harbhajan and Pragyan Ojha - and their combination was one of the huge strengths of the team throughout the tournament.

Not surprisingly, this period of the game was dominated by spin, with Siddharth Trivedi the only medium-pacer in the list.

Top run-scorers in the middle overs (6.1 to 15 overs)
Batsman Innings Runs Average Run rate 4s/ 6s Dot-ball %
Virat Kohli 15 331 55.16 7.66 27/ 10 31.66
Michael Hussey 13 328 54.66 7.74 27/ 8 25.98
Chris Gayle 10 311 62.20 9.87 21/ 23 35.45
Dinesh Karthik 17 289 22.23 7.44 31/ 4 32.62
Suresh Raina 12 277 39.57 8.02 19/ 9 24.64
Rohit Sharma 18 275 39.38 6.57 17/ 8 31.08
Shane Watson 13 275 34.37 8.63 24/ 13 33.51
David Miller 10 233 116.50 8.68 15/ 11 27.95
Leading wicket-takers in the middle overs (6.1 to 15 overs)
Bowler Balls Wickets Average Econ rate Dot-ball %
Harbhajan Singh 306 19 16.15 6.01 38.24
Pragyan Ojha 240 14 19.71 6.90 38.75
R Ashwin 276 12 25.91 6.76 33.33
Amit Mishra 282 12 21.66 5.53 40.78
Siddharth Trivedi 324 11 32.45 6.61 38.58
Ravindra Jadeja 192 10 23.10 7.21 34.38
Karan Sharma 174 10 18.10 6.24 43.10

Slog-over specialists

MS Dhoni was undoubtedly the batting king of the final overs, scoring 286 runs at more than 12 per over, but also take a look at Raina's numbers below: in five innings when he batted in the last five overs, he scored 193 runs from 86 balls without being dismissed even once, giving him a scoring rate of 13.46 runs per over. His dot-ball percentage during this period was an incredibly low 7%. Most of the top batsmen had scoring rates of more than ten per over during this period, but the best of the lot was AB de Villiers' rate of 14.30 runs per over: he scored 186 runs from 78 balls.

The highest wicket-taker during the last five was Dwayne Bravo, whose slower balls and clever variations fetched him 24 wickets at a rate of 7.78 per over. In terms of economy rates, though, the two best bowlers were Dale Steyn and Sunil Narine - both conceded less than seven runs per over, and took a fair number of wickets too.

Top run-scorers in the last 5 overs
Batsman Innings Runs Average Run rate 4s/ 6s Dot-ball %
MS Dhoni 11 286 47.66 12.17 19/ 19 22.70
Keiron Pollard 15 250 35.71 10.06 14/ 20 34.23
Rohit Sharma 11 234 39.00 12.31 14/ 20 26.32
Suresh Raina 5 193 - 13.46 20/ 8 6.98
Brad Hodge 13 187 31.16 9.27 17/ 6 23.97
AB de Villiers 9 186 37.20 14.30 16/ 13 19.23
David Miller 10 179 35.80 12.63 12/ 13 18.82
Leading wicket-takers in the last 5 overs
Bowler Balls Wickets Average Econ rate Dot-ball %
Dwayne Bravo 219 24 11.83 7.78 38.81
James Faulkner 151 16 12.75 8.10 34.44
Dale Steyn 137 15 10.46 6.87 44.53
Sunil Narine 150 13 12.61 6.56 42.00
Vinay Kumar 133 12 17.33 9.38 29.32
Umesh Yadav 144 12 20.58 10.29 27.78

S Rajesh is stats editor of ESPNcricinfo. Follow him on Twitter

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Haleos on May 29, 2013, 9:21 GMT

    CSK dominate the news as well....lol... What I am surprised is the faithful loyalty of CSK fans towards Srini. Some of them do not even understand the meaning of conflict of interest. Reminds of a die hard fans of 3 special cricketers who were punished in the UK.

  • Harshmeswanirafanadal on May 28, 2013, 14:53 GMT

    Hats off to the author for brilliant stats! Well done man! Rainas value as a t20 batsman really shows! So does dhonis last overs magic. Great to see some indian fast bowlers doing very well in powerpoay ovrs!

  • Haleos on May 29, 2013, 9:21 GMT

    CSK dominate the news as well....lol... What I am surprised is the faithful loyalty of CSK fans towards Srini. Some of them do not even understand the meaning of conflict of interest. Reminds of a die hard fans of 3 special cricketers who were punished in the UK.

  • Harshmeswanirafanadal on May 28, 2013, 14:53 GMT

    Hats off to the author for brilliant stats! Well done man! Rainas value as a t20 batsman really shows! So does dhonis last overs magic. Great to see some indian fast bowlers doing very well in powerpoay ovrs!

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  • Harshmeswanirafanadal on May 28, 2013, 14:53 GMT

    Hats off to the author for brilliant stats! Well done man! Rainas value as a t20 batsman really shows! So does dhonis last overs magic. Great to see some indian fast bowlers doing very well in powerpoay ovrs!

  • Haleos on May 29, 2013, 9:21 GMT

    CSK dominate the news as well....lol... What I am surprised is the faithful loyalty of CSK fans towards Srini. Some of them do not even understand the meaning of conflict of interest. Reminds of a die hard fans of 3 special cricketers who were punished in the UK.