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Allott's 101-minute duck and other tail-end torments

The stubborn tailender is high up on cricket's most-frustrating list and this week the List looks at their more notable performances

Travis Basevi and George Binoy

January 10, 2006

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Some statistics, like Bradman's average and the number of centuries Tendulkar has made are known to pretty much every cricket buff. But The List will bring you facts and figures that aren't so obvious, adding fuel to those fiery debates about the most valuable middle-order bat, and the most useless tailender. If there's a particular List that you would like to see, e-mail us with your comments and suggestions.



Steve Harmison on his was to top-scoring for England in the second innings at Cape Town in 2005 © Getty Images
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The stubborn tailender is high up on cricket's most-frustrating list and there have been several who've taken pleasure in making fielding captains tear their hair out. This week the List looks at their more notable performances. To filter out the Wasim Akrams and Shaun Pollocks, a far cry from your conventional mug, we've kept the analysis to performances at No. 10 and 11.

The longest duck
Geoff Allott battled 101 minutes in a 32-run partnership, to which he contributed zilch, with Chris Harris for the last wicket. South Africa had amassed 621 in a rain-affected match and though New Zealand followed on, this partnership had eaten away invaluable time and the match was drawn. Manjural Islam and Peter Such both made 72-minute ducks against Sri Lanka and New Zealand respectively.

Top-scoring from No.11

Bert Vogler's 62, way back in 1906, against England is the highest score when the No.11 has top-scored in an innings. South Africa won that match and it is the only time a team has won when No.11 contributed the most runs. There have been just seven instances of the last man top-scoring but the last two occurences came within two months of each other when Steve Harmison scored 42 against South Africa and Talha Jubair made 31 against India in 2004-05.

An 88-year-old record falls
Mushtaq Ahmed partnered Inzamam-ul-Haq in a nail-biting last-wicket partnership of 57 to snatch victory against Australia in 1994. Pakistan were comfortably placed at 148 for 2, chasing 314, before Shane Warne triggered a middle-order collapse leaving Pakistan 57 to get, with one wicket in hand. Mushtaq occupied the crease for 42 minutes and faced 30 balls for 20 runs. Inzamam, having batted valiantly for 58, almost threw it away when just four runs were needed. Ian Healy missed a stumping after Inzamam stepped out to Warne and the ball went for four byes to give Pakistan victory. The previous highest final-wicket partnership to win a match was 48 between Dave Nourse and Percy Sherwell against England in 1906.

Zaheer's world-record
Zaheer Khan broke Richard Collinge's record for the highest score by a No.11, when he smashed 75 against a hapless Bangladesh at Dhaka. He added 133 runs with Sachin Tendulkar for the last-wicket as India scored 526 and won by an innings and 140 runs.

When the last men standing stood for a while

Australia had skittled England for 61 in just 15.4 overs after making 112 in their first innings. Reggie Duff , a frontline batsman making his debut, was held back to No.10 on a bad wicket and he added 120 runs with Warwick Armstrong, another debutant, for the final wicket. At the time it was the highest partnership for the last wicket and Australia went on to win the Test by 229 runs.

Highest partnerships between No.10 and 11
Batsmen Runs Opposition Scorecard
Ken Higgs & John Snow 128 West Indies Scorecard
Steven Boock & John Bracewell 124 Aus Scorecard
Reggie Duff & Warwick Armstrong 120 England Scorecard
Percy Sherwell & Bert Vogler 94 England Scorecard
Albert Trott & Sydney Callaway 81 England Scorecard

Wilfred Rhodes possesses the highest average for a batsman at No.10 or 11 but he has another record which is far more interesting. He's the only player to be involved in a 100-run partnership, batting at No.11, and a 100-run partnership for the first wicket.

Best batting average for a number 10 or 11 (qualification: 20 innings)
Player Span Inns NO Runs Ave HS 100 50
W Rhodes (Eng) 1899-1930 23 13 252 25.19 40* 0 0
PH Edmonds (Eng) 1978-1987 20 9 260 23.63 50 0 1
PM Pollock (SAf) 1964-1970 20 7 292 22.46 41 0 0
Tauseef Ahmed (Pak) 1980-1993 23 15 171 21.37 23* 0 0
FS Trueman (Eng) 1952-1965 32 11 425 20.23 39* 0 0
A Kumble (India) 1990-2005 25 10 293 19.53 29* 0 0
SK Warne (Aust) 1992-1998 21 5 303 18.93 37 0 0
DK Lillee (Aust) 1971-1984 42 19 423 18.39 73* 0 1
PS de Villiers (SAf) 1993-1998 20 6 257 18.35 66* 0 1
Wasim Bari (Pak) 1967-1984 29 14 271 18.06 60* 0 1
SB Doull (NZ) 1993-2000 35 11 426 17.75 46 0 0
Sarfraz Nawaz (Pak) 1972-1984 23 3 352 17.60 90 0 2
Harbhajan Singh (India) 1998-2005 30 11 331 17.42 47 0 0
PJ Wiseman (NZ) 1998-2005 20 6 241 17.21 36 0 0
NS Yadav (India) 1979-1987 32 11 360 17.14 43 0 0
CEL Ambrose (WI) 1988-2000 30 11 315 16.57 30 0 0
WW Hall (WI) 1958-1969 44 12 512 16.00 50* 0 2
VA Holder (WI) 1969-1979 26 6 319 15.94 42 0 0
GAR Lock (Eng) 1952-1968 22 5 271 15.94 56 0 2
TBA May (Aust) 1987-1994 21 10 172 15.63 42* 0 0

Best partnership average for a number 10 or 11 (qualification: 20 partnerships)
Player Span Num NO Runs Ave High 100 50
NS Yadav (India) 1979-1987 40 5 914 26.11 105 1 3
W Rhodes (Eng) 1899-1930 32 4 718 25.64 130 1 3
A Kumble (India) 1990-2005 36 3 816 24.72 80 0 4
SK Warne (Aust) 1992-1998 28 1 654 24.22 74 0 2
JG Bracewell (NZ) 1980-1990 21 0 503 23.95 124 1 3
Tauseef Ahmed (Pak) 1980-1993 30 4 622 23.92 81 0 3
MC Snedden (NZ) 1981-1990 22 1 502 23.90 136 1 1
DA Allen (Eng) 1960-1966 21 1 474 23.69 64 0 2
SP Jones (Eng) 2002-2005 21 1 471 23.55 62 0 2
Sarfraz Nawaz (Pak) 1972-1984 31 1 694 23.13 161 1 4
SJ Pegler (SAf) 1910-1924 22 0 498 22.63 69 0 4
PJ Wiseman (NZ) 1998-2005 26 1 553 22.12 87 0 3
G Duckworth (Eng) 1928-1936 24 2 472 21.45 69 0 1
VA Holder (WI) 1969-1979 38 3 727 20.77 88 0 4
RW Price (Zimb) 2001-2004 29 1 579 20.67 74 0 4
TBA May (Aust) 1987-1994 28 1 556 20.59 62 0 2
AA Mailey (Aust) 1920-1926 29 0 594 20.48 127 1 3
DK Lillee (Aust) 1971-1983 55 4 1033 20.25 69 0 7
JN Gillespie (Aust) 1996-2005 47 2 908 20.17 133 1 4
BL Cairns (NZ) 1974-1985 23 0 463 20.13 118 1 0

If there's a particular List that you would like to see, e-mail us with your comments and suggestions.

George Binoy is editorial assistant of Cricinfo

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George Binoy Assistant Editor After a major in Economics and nine months in a financial research firm, George realised that equity, capital and the like were not for him. He decided that he wanted to be one of those lucky few who did what they love at work. Alas, his prodigious talent was never spotted and he had to reconcile himself to the fact that he would never earn his money playing cricket for his country, state or even district. He jumped at the opportunity to work for ESPNcricinfo and is now confident of mastering the art of office cricket

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