The recent history of ball tampering August 21, 2006

Scrambling the seam

Cricinfo staff
Tampering with a cricket ball isn't a new phenomenon but it was only in late 2000 that the ICC decided to impose a five-run penalty if any side was found guilty of affecting the condition of the ball. Here we track the recent instances

Tampering with a cricket ball isn't a new phenomenon but it was only in late 2000 that the ICC decided to impose a five-run penalty if any side was found guilty of altering the condition of the ball. Here we track the recent instances



Back in 2001, Sachin Tendulkar was found guilty of 'acting on the match ball' © Getty Images

Waqar Younis Pakistan v South Africa, Singer Cup, 2000
Received a one ODI ban and was fined 50% of his match fee. Azhar Mahmood was fined 30% of his match fee for "abetting'' Waqar in the same match. Moin Khan, the Pakistan captain, was also severely reprimanded.

Two months later the ICC decreed that any bowler found tampering with the ball will be suspended from bowling in that innings and an additional five runs would be awarded to the batting side.

Sachin Tendulkar South Africa v India, Port Elizabeth, 2001
Mike Denness, the match referee for the India-South Africa series, found Tendulkar guilty of "acting on the match ball" while bowling on the third day of the second Test at Port Elizabeth. Tendulkar was banned for one Test match and also fined 75% of his match fee.

Six Pakistan players fined for ball tampering Ramadan Cup, 2002
Naved Latif, Qaiser Abbas, Yasir Arafat, Sajid Shah, Zahid Saeed and Rao Iftikhar Anjum were found guilty of ball tampering during the Ramadan Cup domestic one-day cricket tournament in Pakistan. A fine of Rs 3,000 (US$50 approx) was slapped on each.

Shoaib Akhtar New Zealand v Pakistan, Dambulla, 2003
Fined 75% of his match fee and banned for two one-day internationals for ball-tampering after television footage showed him scratching the surface of the ball during Pakistan's 22-run victory, over New Zealand, in the Bank Alfalah Cup.

Ball-tampering accusation taints Barbados' win Barbados v Guyana, Carib Beer Cup, 2004
Barbados's Carib Beer Cup win against Guyana in the opening round of the 2004 Carib Beer Cup was marred by the first five-run penalty for ball-tampering in West Indian first-class domestic cricket.

Rahul Dravid India v Zimbabwe, Brisbane, 2004
Rahul Dravid was fined 50% of his match fee, after being caught by the TV cameras rubbing a cough lozenge on the shiny side of the white ball. Match referee Clive Lloyd dismissed suggestions that Dravid "accidentally" tampered with the ball during India's VB Series match against Zimbabwe.



Shoaib Akhtar: handed a two-ODI ban in 2003 © Getty Images

Surrey penalised Surrey v Nottinghamshire, County Championship, 2005
Surrey were given a five-run penalty for ball-tampering, after an incident that came to light after the first day's play at The Oval. They were also docked eight county championship points.

Steve Kirby Glamorgan v Gloucestershire, County Championship, 2005
Steve Kirby, the Gloucestershire fast bowler, was accused of ball tampering after allegedly scraping the match ball on the surface of a concrete car-park during their game against Glamorgan at Cardiff. He was given a suspended three-day ban from all ECB cricket.

Mick Lewis Queensland v Victoria, Pura Cup, 2005
Michael Lewis, the fast bowler from Victoria, was investigated for alleged ball-tampering during the Pura Cup game against Queensland at the Gabba. In what was the first such video review in the history of Australian domestic cricket, Lewis was found to have applied his thumbnail to the ball but the umpires, stating that he hadn't done anything illegal, let him off with a warning.