January 13, 2009

Doubts derailed local hero

After surviving a series of career-threatening slumps, Hayden had the energy and the ability, but not the desire
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Matthew Hayden's last moments as a Test player came with his struggles in Sydney © PA Photos
 

Until the past year nothing could pause Matthew Hayden's immense self-belief and it was impossible to think it could shatter. Not with the false starts over the first six seasons of his Test career, when he decided to frame his baggy green behind glass. Not Rod Marsh telling him he only wanted future first-class players at the Academy. Not a bunch of critics picking over his rigid front-foot technique in the early days. Not an awful series during the Ashes defeat in 2005.

Only when he became unsure about where he was heading after picking up a long-term heel injury in 2008 did the doubts creep in. By then he was 36, could develop a solid argument to being Australia's greatest opener, and had the selectors' backing to push on to the Ashes. He went to the West Indies but left without playing a game, and his winter was spent in rehabilitation instead of relaxation. There was uncertainty over his return and when he did come back in India he was slower. His eyes had lost their sharpness, the dominator was mortal.

For a man who never wanted to lean backwards - reversing was not in his nature - the new state tormented his mind and stole his game. Expecting his form to return with any straight drive, Hayden waited through series against India, New Zealand and South Africa for the shot that regained his status. It never came. After 103 Tests and 30 hundreds, the third most by an Australian, he was finally finished. At the SCG Test, when he was appearing in a match he should not have been picked for, he was the dead opener limping.

Only a hundred could get him to South Africa, but he played on twice, first after spending almost three hours struggling over 31, and in the second innings he attempted a swish over midwicket on 39. Again the ball found his bat on the way to the stumps. Hayden had refused to outline his exit plan, but there were key signs his Test days would finish in Sydney.

His wife Kellie watched from the stands with rare intensity and stood to clap when the bails fell. As Hayden started to walk off he wiped his eyes, looked around the ground and briefly raised his bat. Ricky Ponting waited by the boundary until Hayden had jogged off. And then he was gone, returning briefly to drop a catch towards the conclusion of the tight victory. At the end of the match Andrew Hilditch, the chairman of selectors, sat next to Hayden and told him his limited-overs career was finished after 161 ODIs, two World Cup victories and nine Twenty20s. Six days later he bowed out in a corporate room at the Gabba, a ground which had become as familiar as his backyard.

In Australia Hayden will be missed for his powerful starts, imposing stature and the way he smothered opponents and set up the team's success. Generally when he struggled, Australia lost: England in 2005 and India and South Africa in 2008. He won't be mourned in the rest of the world. Opposition players, if they spoke like Australians, would call him an "ordinary bloke". Too mouthy, too arrogant, too contradictory and lacking humility. They were the characteristics that allowed him to develop into a modern on-field hero, first for Queenslanders, and then for Australians. Off the ground he was gentle, domesticated and adventurous.

 
 
In Australia Hayden will be missed for his powerful starts, imposing stature and the way he smothered opponents and set up the team's success. Generally when he struggled, Australia lost
 

With Hayden's departure only Ponting remains of the greats that ruled the world over more than a decade. Hayden holds an important place and will always remain a role model for those who don't succeed immediately. Around the time he came back into the side in 2000, Steve Waugh, the captain, said Hayden was a player who could average 50 in Tests. At the time it was the sort of statement that was shocking in the same way that end-of-the-world predictions cause laughs and then uncomfortable thoughts. Could he be right?

Hayden departs with an average of 50.73 runs and a mean reputation. No specialist Australian opener has scored as many runs as his 8625. Unlike Waugh, Hayden could not stay on past 37. A piece of him left in 2007 when Justin Langer retired and without his great friend life looked harder and less fun. He was a pensioned widower re-entering the game too soon.

It doesn't take much for an elite sportsman to become a very good one, translating to the difference between coping with new-ball spells and over-balancing against them. In India it was Zaheer Khan's wobbling deliveries that arrived too quickly, then to his horror Chris Martin knocked him over first ball in Brisbane. South Africa's group of complementary pacemen were too much, telling him another trip to England should be traded for time at the beach and behind the hotplate, instead of in the fire.

After surviving a series of career-threatening slumps, he had the energy and the ability, but not the desire. Hayden could no longer hold his stare. The blink told him it was over. He just had to convince himself he was sure.

Peter English is the Australasia editor of Cricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • motherocker on January 14, 2009, 22:05 GMT

    All of us will miss Haydos and his amazing contribution to not just Australian cricket, but cricket worldwide. I personally enjoyed his batting, all full of class tinged with agressiveness, and a player that looked very elegant when driving, especially through the offside. It was a sad exit for him, but everything can't go on forever. His great personality made him and even better player. It is true that he had success against the game's weakest teams, but we must not forget the entertainment he has provided in the last 5 years. Have a good life, HAYDOS, and see you in the IPL---HOPEFULLY!!!

  • Kunal-Talgeri on January 14, 2009, 12:24 GMT

    Am gonna miss Matt Hayden's imposing presence in the slips, and his buccaneering batsmanship.

  • sholari on January 14, 2009, 12:04 GMT

    It constantly surprises me that people want to downplay Hayden's score of 380 because it was only made against Zimbabwe, yet they are more than willing to overlook the number of wickets Murali took against Zimbabwe and Bangladesh when supporting his claim as the best bowler ever! The fact is that none of Langer, Ponting, Martyn, Steve Waugh or Lehman were able to make a century in that game. Clearly it's not just as simple as walking out there and knocking a couple of balls around! Hayden also scored his runs in just over one and a half days and Australia went on to win the match. Lara batted for two and a half days to beat Hayden's record, in a match that was ultimately drawn because he batted for so long. On a final note, if batsmen are to be judged by the quality of the opposing bowlers, then why aren't there a dozen openers running around the world with averages over 50? Smith, Sehwag... Hayden. These are talents that are rare and should not be dismissed so readily.

  • Manush on January 14, 2009, 9:18 GMT

    His average is impressive and his style will not allow good bowlers to settle. But his timing of exit was poor. As usual the Australian orchestra is in action. His lack of technical skill do not make him a great player.Australia like any other cricket playing country is faced with empty cupboard or filled with average stuff. Suddenly they desperate to find talents for replacement. Good opportunity for South Africa,England and India to bring them down to earth.

  • kkhin on January 13, 2009, 23:42 GMT

    I guess we have to agree that he was Australia's greatest opening batsman. Having said that, it doesn't say much for Australian opening batsmen. I don't think he would make the top five of even his "mum's" list of all-time great opening batsman.

  • Firefox87 on January 13, 2009, 20:05 GMT

    I just want to say that "Every good thing comes to an end". Have a good life Haydos

  • tomjs100 on January 13, 2009, 16:07 GMT

    Luckily for Hayden, the statistical significance of the runs he made will be remembered long after the quality of the bowling attacks have been forgotten.

    Still, good luck to him in retirement, and despite my earlier comment, it still takes a heck of a player to avoid making a mistake when compiling a score of 380, even against a very mediocre attack. Overall: A fine player, but certainly not the best opener ever.

  • Krooks on January 13, 2009, 16:03 GMT

    Albion1 - I agree with your comments about Yuvraj but not about Sehwag, You have not seen Sehwag play I guess, and are only aware of his recent exploits. In his first test agaist SA, when SA still had the fiery Donald and a fast Pollock, he made a century on a very difficult Bloemfontein wicket. Then when he was made an opener, he sliced the English attack in English conditions( read green seaming wicket and overcast day). Then when the whole Indian team collectively failed in NZ 2003- green wickets, under-prepared pitches, he scored 2 centuries. Fast Forward to Melbourne 2004-05 and Sehwag hit 194 against an attack which had McGrath, Warne and Gillespie in his prime. I am not even taking into account last year's exploits as you will say that he did it on flat tracks and lesser attacks. Is this enough to be a supporter? Hayden was a good player but not a great player, as he shuffled a lot in the crease, he inspired a lot of front-foot players but his method can't work for everyone.

  • viku13a13a on January 13, 2009, 15:48 GMT

    Thank you HAYDO for your work in cricket, you and Gilly have provided some of the best shots and entertainment. It will be hard for CA to find someone like you. The only thing i feel bad for is there should be a better way to let someone like you go. Not being selected in the team and there for the only option is to retire. I do not think it is a good idea. Yes i do agree that you have not made runs this year like you have been but look at INDIA they still got Dravid. Sorry CA do not see it my way but Thank you for your contrubution to cricket and see you in IPL.

  • CricketLoversRuleTheWorld on January 13, 2009, 15:38 GMT

    Miss u Haydos.. well hope to see in IPL.. u really r the modern g8.. as good as Lara , Sachin and Ponting.. byeeeeeeeeeeeee....

  • motherocker on January 14, 2009, 22:05 GMT

    All of us will miss Haydos and his amazing contribution to not just Australian cricket, but cricket worldwide. I personally enjoyed his batting, all full of class tinged with agressiveness, and a player that looked very elegant when driving, especially through the offside. It was a sad exit for him, but everything can't go on forever. His great personality made him and even better player. It is true that he had success against the game's weakest teams, but we must not forget the entertainment he has provided in the last 5 years. Have a good life, HAYDOS, and see you in the IPL---HOPEFULLY!!!

  • Kunal-Talgeri on January 14, 2009, 12:24 GMT

    Am gonna miss Matt Hayden's imposing presence in the slips, and his buccaneering batsmanship.

  • sholari on January 14, 2009, 12:04 GMT

    It constantly surprises me that people want to downplay Hayden's score of 380 because it was only made against Zimbabwe, yet they are more than willing to overlook the number of wickets Murali took against Zimbabwe and Bangladesh when supporting his claim as the best bowler ever! The fact is that none of Langer, Ponting, Martyn, Steve Waugh or Lehman were able to make a century in that game. Clearly it's not just as simple as walking out there and knocking a couple of balls around! Hayden also scored his runs in just over one and a half days and Australia went on to win the match. Lara batted for two and a half days to beat Hayden's record, in a match that was ultimately drawn because he batted for so long. On a final note, if batsmen are to be judged by the quality of the opposing bowlers, then why aren't there a dozen openers running around the world with averages over 50? Smith, Sehwag... Hayden. These are talents that are rare and should not be dismissed so readily.

  • Manush on January 14, 2009, 9:18 GMT

    His average is impressive and his style will not allow good bowlers to settle. But his timing of exit was poor. As usual the Australian orchestra is in action. His lack of technical skill do not make him a great player.Australia like any other cricket playing country is faced with empty cupboard or filled with average stuff. Suddenly they desperate to find talents for replacement. Good opportunity for South Africa,England and India to bring them down to earth.

  • kkhin on January 13, 2009, 23:42 GMT

    I guess we have to agree that he was Australia's greatest opening batsman. Having said that, it doesn't say much for Australian opening batsmen. I don't think he would make the top five of even his "mum's" list of all-time great opening batsman.

  • Firefox87 on January 13, 2009, 20:05 GMT

    I just want to say that "Every good thing comes to an end". Have a good life Haydos

  • tomjs100 on January 13, 2009, 16:07 GMT

    Luckily for Hayden, the statistical significance of the runs he made will be remembered long after the quality of the bowling attacks have been forgotten.

    Still, good luck to him in retirement, and despite my earlier comment, it still takes a heck of a player to avoid making a mistake when compiling a score of 380, even against a very mediocre attack. Overall: A fine player, but certainly not the best opener ever.

  • Krooks on January 13, 2009, 16:03 GMT

    Albion1 - I agree with your comments about Yuvraj but not about Sehwag, You have not seen Sehwag play I guess, and are only aware of his recent exploits. In his first test agaist SA, when SA still had the fiery Donald and a fast Pollock, he made a century on a very difficult Bloemfontein wicket. Then when he was made an opener, he sliced the English attack in English conditions( read green seaming wicket and overcast day). Then when the whole Indian team collectively failed in NZ 2003- green wickets, under-prepared pitches, he scored 2 centuries. Fast Forward to Melbourne 2004-05 and Sehwag hit 194 against an attack which had McGrath, Warne and Gillespie in his prime. I am not even taking into account last year's exploits as you will say that he did it on flat tracks and lesser attacks. Is this enough to be a supporter? Hayden was a good player but not a great player, as he shuffled a lot in the crease, he inspired a lot of front-foot players but his method can't work for everyone.

  • viku13a13a on January 13, 2009, 15:48 GMT

    Thank you HAYDO for your work in cricket, you and Gilly have provided some of the best shots and entertainment. It will be hard for CA to find someone like you. The only thing i feel bad for is there should be a better way to let someone like you go. Not being selected in the team and there for the only option is to retire. I do not think it is a good idea. Yes i do agree that you have not made runs this year like you have been but look at INDIA they still got Dravid. Sorry CA do not see it my way but Thank you for your contrubution to cricket and see you in IPL.

  • CricketLoversRuleTheWorld on January 13, 2009, 15:38 GMT

    Miss u Haydos.. well hope to see in IPL.. u really r the modern g8.. as good as Lara , Sachin and Ponting.. byeeeeeeeeeeeee....

  • Rizshu on January 13, 2009, 13:47 GMT

    A Greatest to watch! He was so arrogant, too cheeky, but a wrestler bodied opener was a real strength in Australian dominance. But being older in troop he was ineffective in recent shows. He even had lost the utter dominance on opponents; making his wicket as a lollipop! But a great career! Easy to forget! Hats of You Wrestler!

  • Stollie on January 13, 2009, 12:38 GMT

    Thank you Matty .. much will be said on this site and in others, but in the end, each of us will miss your contribution no matter what else is said.

  • romero1 on January 13, 2009, 12:25 GMT

    Stars have a way of aligning favourably for some people. Hayden may have scored piles of runs but a large number have come against some pretty ordinary opposition and majority in home conditions. The two or three times Hayden came up against quality bowling he failed. 380 against Zimbabwe or 204 against India with only one bowler (Harbhajan - the rest were making up numbers), 197 at Brisbane against an England attack which had just lost their best bowler Simon Jones to an injury. When the going got tough against Alan Donald or Walsh and Ambrose or Jones, Flintoff and Harmison (2005) or Zaheer (2008) his game suffered. Is it a coincidence the 100 at the oval came with Simon Jones out with injury? Matt was a good opener, but he was not in the David Boon or Mark Taylor class.

  • rohanbala on January 13, 2009, 12:09 GMT

    Thanks Hayden for the entertainment you provided to cricket lovers the World over.. Many of us will surely miss the imposing figure of the Queensland giant. However many bowlers who bore the brunt of your attack must now be heaving a sigh of relief at not having to bowl at you henceforth.

  • boooonnie on January 13, 2009, 11:57 GMT

    Best opening batsmen of the modern era. Only Sehwag and Smith comes close.

  • albion1 on January 13, 2009, 11:06 GMT

    No player benefited more from the decline in bowling standards, the growing proportion of flat decks, heavy bats, short boundaries etc etc. At the beginning of his career he failed against quality bowlers; when he came back they were gone. In 2005 he again failed against pace and movement and India and South Africa have both confimed the pattern with their high quality attacks. Few players justify the tag 'flat track bully' more than Hayden - if he made an innings on a tricky wicket, against a world class attack that meant the difference between victory and defeat I am yet to hear about it. His wonderful eye and power meant he was supreme when the odds were stacked in his favour. Sehwag and Yuvraj are likely to suffer the same epitaphs - as good as Tendulkar, Gavaskar, Dravid? Thought not.

    Allan Border, Steve Waugh, Ricky Ponting were/are greats; Hayden is not in the same class.

  • fnm500 on January 13, 2009, 10:58 GMT

    The greatest series ever played in my opinion was the 2001 Border Gavaskar series in India- the VVS Laxman & Harbhajan series. Hayden peformed incredibly well in that series and ever since I've been in awe of the man. He is definitely one of the greats. For an opposition fan, no other wicket save for Ponting's gave me greater pleasure and relief. He will be missed for this reason, for the challenge and satisfaction one got for beating a team that contained such greatness. Thank You Hayden for taking test cricket to the next level. Guys like you have improved the standard of the game.

  • debas on January 13, 2009, 10:35 GMT

    It will be sad not to see Mathew Hayden in action again.His presence ,competitiveness and apparent arrogance on field added a zing to the action and was good for modern day cricket. You were One character,Matty! You will be missed. Best wishes for whatever you do next.....

  • QUDSI on January 13, 2009, 8:16 GMT

    it is kinda useless to say something here, because this website approve only the comments which they think is right.i have already said a lot about Hayden in the articles like "who should replace Hayden"? but none of my comments appeared. but here i will only say that Ashes is gone and Australian media and selectors will regret this moment.

  • IndianCricLover on January 13, 2009, 7:19 GMT

    Calling Hayden a great opener will be putting a question mark on likes of Bob Simpson, Bill Lawry, Geoff Boycott, Sunil Gavaskar, Gordon Greenidge, Graham Gooch, Desmond Haynes who had held forte agaist some of he best bowling legends of their time. Hayden was found lacking in technique and skils when confronted with likes of Ambrose, Walsh (during debut) and Istant, Zaheer, Steyn, Nitini (during his twilight in career). At best, he was excellent against medicore pace attacks of late 90's and early 2000's and flourished especially against Zimbabwe.

    But all credit as he has managed to score where others were found wanting.

  • Ajay42 on January 13, 2009, 7:01 GMT

    Like Mr English rightly says, Hayden's departure will not be mourned by the rest of the cricketing world. A great batsman, he was more of a backyard bully than anything else and he revelled in being unpleasant and wore his lack of graciousness like a badge. Steve Waugh's toughness always drew admiration, Hayden's surly nature did not.However, n cricketing terms, there is no doubt that he will go down as Australia's greatest opener and his lack of form meant that Australia were very vulnerable.

  • Moemz on January 13, 2009, 6:55 GMT

    Hayden was a truly domineering force. He plyed his trade with such valour and gusto. He didnt have much time for the MCC coaching manual and showed that like many other greats its his uniqueness that set him apart from the rest. As a South African, I can be but glad to see the back of him. As a cricket fan, it is a great loss however his legacy will remain. Hats off to you Haydo's... your two step down the track slash through mid wicket will be sorely missed.

  • Steve. on January 13, 2009, 6:45 GMT

    No player has benifited as much from the helmet as Haydon. He cannot be rated as a great as the quicks of days gone bye would have terrified him without a hard hat on his head. Sorry but he was over-rated.

  • Rooboy on January 13, 2009, 6:41 GMT

    Thanks for the memories Haydos, and there were lots of memories to be thankul for. I don't know what else to say other than I just hope Hayden can be shown a bit of respect at this time, and that people like Gilliana, the indian pretending to be an Australian who posted on the previous Hayden article, can withhold their bitterness and just accept what a fine player the man has been, without resorting to childishly insulting his record. Not that anyone should care what such small minded people think anyway. We'll miss ya Haydos, good luck for the future.

  • Bumpster on January 13, 2009, 6:33 GMT

    Haydos's retirement is good for cricket. No more flat track bully. It also means no more self absorbed arrogance and could actually be a benefit to the current australian team, as lets be honest they are going through a rebuilding process.

  • Percy_Fender on January 13, 2009, 6:23 GMT

    Mathew Hayden was certainly a modern day great in world cricket. Though his legend really started only in 2001 in India, he has achieved in these seven years much that he can be proud of. It is very significant that he has been an integral part of Australian cricket over nearly eight years of their twelve year dominance in World cricket.He may not not have been technically flawless but his bouncer-like personality and willingness to go hammer and tongs from the very beginning would often play a big psychological part in demoralising bowlers all over the world. Sadly, he never came across as being objective in his off field utterances. For this he will be remembered more for his belligerance than his achievements as a player. I wish his successors in the Australian team would seek to emulate the Taylors and Gillespies of Australian cricket.

  • coolaeddy on January 13, 2009, 5:31 GMT

    Though I am an Indian, I will surely and definitely miss one of the modern day greats!!!!

    Hats off to Haydos....

  • porshatom on January 13, 2009, 5:10 GMT

    It's sad to see Matthew Hayden go, he did a lot for australian cricket & entertained the fans for many years. It was a privledge to watch him play. The Australian media definetly contributed to his retirement by creating pressure on him to perform. I feel Hayden came back to early from injury to the Australian team & should have played some 1st class cricket to get his footwork & eye in. I hope he joins the IPL as he could be a dominating force. Him & Gilly to team up again perhaps? Matthew Hayden a Living Legend!

  • g-anil on January 13, 2009, 4:38 GMT

    Surely one of the greatest and best test opener in the world.

  • cricketsimpleton on January 13, 2009, 4:38 GMT

    i hope media in and outside of australia will be the happiest people. The speculation created by them has ended the careers of one of the finest legends of cricket. I would strongly say that media was the sole reason for Hayden's retirement. This is not the way he should have retired. He was recovering from an Injury. What happened to tendulkar,lara and all greats had these kind of sloppy patches.But They did come back strongly. During the AUS SAF series, i wonder whether the media people really worried on AUS defeats, but they worried much about his retirement.Yes there are young guys waiting for places. But Hayden was showing glimpses of coming back.He should have been retained Though a die hard fan of aussie, i wish they should feel the loss of this supremo. This is very bad. Media should always encourage a batsman who is out of form or struggling for runs.Not to make him retire.

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  • cricketsimpleton on January 13, 2009, 4:38 GMT

    i hope media in and outside of australia will be the happiest people. The speculation created by them has ended the careers of one of the finest legends of cricket. I would strongly say that media was the sole reason for Hayden's retirement. This is not the way he should have retired. He was recovering from an Injury. What happened to tendulkar,lara and all greats had these kind of sloppy patches.But They did come back strongly. During the AUS SAF series, i wonder whether the media people really worried on AUS defeats, but they worried much about his retirement.Yes there are young guys waiting for places. But Hayden was showing glimpses of coming back.He should have been retained Though a die hard fan of aussie, i wish they should feel the loss of this supremo. This is very bad. Media should always encourage a batsman who is out of form or struggling for runs.Not to make him retire.

  • g-anil on January 13, 2009, 4:38 GMT

    Surely one of the greatest and best test opener in the world.

  • porshatom on January 13, 2009, 5:10 GMT

    It's sad to see Matthew Hayden go, he did a lot for australian cricket & entertained the fans for many years. It was a privledge to watch him play. The Australian media definetly contributed to his retirement by creating pressure on him to perform. I feel Hayden came back to early from injury to the Australian team & should have played some 1st class cricket to get his footwork & eye in. I hope he joins the IPL as he could be a dominating force. Him & Gilly to team up again perhaps? Matthew Hayden a Living Legend!

  • coolaeddy on January 13, 2009, 5:31 GMT

    Though I am an Indian, I will surely and definitely miss one of the modern day greats!!!!

    Hats off to Haydos....

  • Percy_Fender on January 13, 2009, 6:23 GMT

    Mathew Hayden was certainly a modern day great in world cricket. Though his legend really started only in 2001 in India, he has achieved in these seven years much that he can be proud of. It is very significant that he has been an integral part of Australian cricket over nearly eight years of their twelve year dominance in World cricket.He may not not have been technically flawless but his bouncer-like personality and willingness to go hammer and tongs from the very beginning would often play a big psychological part in demoralising bowlers all over the world. Sadly, he never came across as being objective in his off field utterances. For this he will be remembered more for his belligerance than his achievements as a player. I wish his successors in the Australian team would seek to emulate the Taylors and Gillespies of Australian cricket.

  • Bumpster on January 13, 2009, 6:33 GMT

    Haydos's retirement is good for cricket. No more flat track bully. It also means no more self absorbed arrogance and could actually be a benefit to the current australian team, as lets be honest they are going through a rebuilding process.

  • Rooboy on January 13, 2009, 6:41 GMT

    Thanks for the memories Haydos, and there were lots of memories to be thankul for. I don't know what else to say other than I just hope Hayden can be shown a bit of respect at this time, and that people like Gilliana, the indian pretending to be an Australian who posted on the previous Hayden article, can withhold their bitterness and just accept what a fine player the man has been, without resorting to childishly insulting his record. Not that anyone should care what such small minded people think anyway. We'll miss ya Haydos, good luck for the future.

  • Steve. on January 13, 2009, 6:45 GMT

    No player has benifited as much from the helmet as Haydon. He cannot be rated as a great as the quicks of days gone bye would have terrified him without a hard hat on his head. Sorry but he was over-rated.

  • Moemz on January 13, 2009, 6:55 GMT

    Hayden was a truly domineering force. He plyed his trade with such valour and gusto. He didnt have much time for the MCC coaching manual and showed that like many other greats its his uniqueness that set him apart from the rest. As a South African, I can be but glad to see the back of him. As a cricket fan, it is a great loss however his legacy will remain. Hats off to you Haydo's... your two step down the track slash through mid wicket will be sorely missed.

  • Ajay42 on January 13, 2009, 7:01 GMT

    Like Mr English rightly says, Hayden's departure will not be mourned by the rest of the cricketing world. A great batsman, he was more of a backyard bully than anything else and he revelled in being unpleasant and wore his lack of graciousness like a badge. Steve Waugh's toughness always drew admiration, Hayden's surly nature did not.However, n cricketing terms, there is no doubt that he will go down as Australia's greatest opener and his lack of form meant that Australia were very vulnerable.