Features FeaturesRSS FeedFeeds

World Cup memories: 1997

A litany of woe

Anjum Chopra looks back at the sixth women's World Cup

Nishi Narayanan

March 11, 2009

Text size: A | A


They're out there somewhere: Chopra and Co. had to sit in the stands for the 1997 final, though they were special guests © Getty Images
Enlarge
 

Cricinfo asked former and current women players for their lasting memories from each of the eight World Cups so far. Anjum Chopra, the former India captain, who is playing in her fourth World Cup at present, looks back at the sixth tournament.

1997, India
Anjum Chopra

We played the semi-final against Australia at Delhi's Harbax Singh Stadium. There was no one to move the sightscreen, so with a right-hander and left-hander batting, the Indian fielders had to run from mid-on or elsewhere to move it for them.

To make things worse, we were fined for slow over-rate and docked two overs from our chase. After our loss, we were invited by the association to watch the final between England and Australia at the Eden Gardens. But when we got to the game, there were no pavilion seats kept for us, so we had to sit in the stands. We were told to come down to the presentation ceremony after the game but when we tried to make our way to the ground, we were stopped by security men who refused to let us through even when we told them we were members of the Indian team.

The tournament was also scheduled poorly - with warm-ups in the warmer south and the World Cup matches in the cold, foggy north. We spent a lot of our time waiting at airports or at grounds, and even missed a day of practice because it took so long to get to where we were staying. I can laugh at it now but back then it felt miserable to be in such a situation.

As told to Nishi Narayanan

RSS Feeds: Nishi Narayanan

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

FeedbackTop
Email Feedback Print
Share
E-mail
Feedback
Print
Nishi NarayananClose
Staff writer Nishi studied journalism because she didn't want to study at all. As she spent most of the time at j-school stationed in front of the TV watching cricket her placement officer had no choice but to send out a desperate plea to the editor of ESPNcricinfo to hire her. Though some of the senior staff was suspicious at that a diploma in journalism was the worst thing that could happen to ESPNcricinfo and she did nothing to allay them, she continues to log in everyday and do her two bits for cricket.
Related Links

'Ponting was an instinctive, aggressive player'

Modern Masters: Rahul Dravid and Sanjay Manjrekar discuss Ricky Ponting's technique

    MacLeod spells hope for Scotland

Allrounder Calum MacLeod's return from a faulty action is key to Scotland's World Cup hopes. By Tim Wigmore

The Australian who dares to attack spin

From lead spinner and No. 8, Steven Smith has become a central figure in the batting line-up. By Brydon Coverdale

    'Gibbs used to toss the ball like a basketball'

My XI: Erapalli Prasanna on the West Indian offspinner who had a killer instinct

Cricket's humanity resists specialisation

Jon Hotten: Major sports are driving their competitors towards homogenous physical ideals, but cricket seems to celebrate diversity

News | Features Last 7 days

Manic one-day chases, and daddy partnerships

Also, most brothers in a Test XI, and the fastest to 20 ODI centuries

Has international cricket begun to break up?

The gap between the haves and the have-nots is growing wider, and the disenchantment is forcing a devaluation of Test cricket among weaker teams

Well worth the wait

Zulfiqar Babar missed five seasons between his first two first-class matches, and was 34 when he finally made his Test debut, but he is quickly making up for all the lost time with his artful left-arm spin

Younis Khan and the art of scoring hundreds

Out of 70 batsmen who've scored 15 or more Test hundreds only five are from Pakistan, but Younis Khan's appetite for hundreds matches that of some of the top contemporary batsmen

Australia outdone in every way

Surviving into the final session of the last day cannot disguise the fact that Australia's continued inability to play spin contributed to an all-round thrashing

News | Features Last 7 days

    Has international cricket begun to break up? (83)

    The gap between the haves and the have-nots is growing wider, and the disenchantment is forcing a devaluation of Test cricket among weaker teams

    Lyon low after high of 2013 (51)

    The offspinner was Australia's highest wicket-taker in 2013, but his form has dipped sharply this year

    Australia outdone in every way (51)

    Surviving into the final session of the last day cannot disguise the fact that Australia's continued inability to play spin contributed to an all-round thrashing

    Well worth the wait (36)

    Zulfiqar Babar missed five seasons between his first two first-class matches, and was 34 when he finally made his Test debut, but he is quickly making up for all the lost time with his artful left-arm spin

    No Ajmal, no problem for Pakistan (33)

    When a team loses its best bowler, it is expected that the team's performance will suffer. As usual, Pakistan defied the expectations