England v Pakistan, third Test, Headingley, 1982 April 4, 2010

Imran stands up to England

When the warrior marshalled his troops to fight like they had never before
43

It's the summer of 1982. Pakistan are playing England at Headingley, in the series decider. They could have won at Edgbaston but the final day is my first taste of Pakistan's difficulties in chasing a fourth-innings total - two wickets lost before a run is scored. Unpredictable Pakistan? You bet.

This is followed by an uplifting historic first win at Lord's, where Mohsin "The Eagle" soars and Mudassar "Mud" Nazar turns in his most memorable performance for Pakistan - as a medium-pacer. This is the awakening, Pakistan cricket battling on equal terms with their former imperial master.

Headingley, all overhead cloud and seam movement, is a ground that doesn't inspire confidence in our team. England are favourites, especially as Pakistan's injury list means "Halwai" Ehteshamuddin has been drafted in from the Bolton League as third seamer. There is a subplot - the battle to be recognised as the world's No. 1 allrounder: Imran v Botham on show, with Kapil Dev and Richard Hadlee in the wings.

It's the school holidays, and I'm young enough and local enough to attend all five days, and I do. I'm mesmerised from the first minute, even though the highest total in the match is only 275. It is a classic Headingley wicket and every run is a minor triumph. Pakistan take a first-innings lead, with captain Imran Khan top-scoring and then taking five wickets. Imran's expert marshalling of the tail to rescue Pakistan's innings is as enjoyable as his sprinting, leaping fast bowling. I see Botham, Gower, Willis, Gatting, Miandad, Zaheer, Majid, and Qadir, some of the greatest cricketers in history, and it feels special.

The second innings is a real struggle for Pakistan, Mohsin and Mudassar fall to Willis without a run on the board. At a moment of crisis Javed flashes a breathtaking, almost reckless fifty, before Imran is again left with the tail to set England a worthy target. He battles every inch, judiciously switching between defence and attack, ordering his tailenders how to approach each ball. Nor does Imran shirk any challenge. He wants to face every ball and does his utmost to protect his partner.

It is Imran against the English, a warrior standing alone to defend his nation. And Imran is winning, the target creeping above 200, until umpire David Constant intervenes. Sikander Bakht, Pakistan's matchstick fast bowler, has valiantly supported his captain with 7 off 47, but Constant gives him out caught off his pad to Vic Marks. It is a decision that any member of the crowd can instantly judge is incorrect. Sikander is stunned, Imran fuming under his helmet, Pakistan's rally undone by treachery, their supporters incandescent in the stadium.

The Halwai is helped on to the pitch; his 14 overs in the first innings and third-ball duck have earned him a pulled muscle. Imran knows he has run out of time and quickly falls to Botham. He marches off, head held high, with no acknowledgment to Ehtesham, who has to be carried off the pitch. A moment of comedy to break the tension.

Pakistan lose by three wickets, but they have fought like we've never seen them before. It is a moment of pride. Imran has shown Pakistan cricket a new way, the way of the warrior. The series, to my mind, is the turning point in Pakistan's cricket history. There is no looking back from here.

Those feelings are still with me now. The tension of the five days, the injustice and anger of Sikander's dismissal, the thrill of Miandad's innings, the expectation of each one of Qadir's deliveries, and above all the pride of watching Imran's fearless leadership. I know I've witnessed something special in these five days but how could I know what would follow in the next three decades?

Kamran Abbasi is the editor of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • gallant_cricketer on April 7, 2010, 21:08 GMT

    The English performance was also commendable which only made the series more closely fought and exciting. One highlight was that Botham as a great player changed his batting style from relying on aggression to exercising patience and defense, showing that he could bat that way too.

    The Lords test included one of the fastest overs Imran ever bowled. It was his first over in the morning on the third day in which he removed Jackman, which led to England following on and ultimately Pakistan's win.

    Another comedy scene I recall is frowning face of Qadir with vehement appealing and waving of arms after hisLBW appeal against Botham was turned down. It seemed pretty close though and it made Qadir emotionally devastated.

    I do agree with the Kamran that this series was a turning point for Pakistan in that they learnt how to fight and win.

  • straight6 on April 7, 2010, 4:16 GMT

    That 1982 Series was just superb and I will always have fond memories of it. I was just a little kid, but I saw Imran Khan at his best. Taking Bothams middlestump at Edgebaston for A GOLDEN DUCK was just brill! Patrick Eager brought out a book later that summer and the pictures certainly tell the story. In the Lords Test Mohsin and Mudassar got the honours, but Imran had bowled probably his best and in one particular spell which I saw with my very own eyes, Imran yorked Bob Taylor, the England keeper, full on his toes, and he got injured and play was halted. In the Headingley Test again Imran was bowling with great pace and one particular incident was the Allan Lamb incident where Imran bowled Allan Lamb a very ferocious bouncer and Lamby very nearly knocked his helmet onto his stumps by taking evasive action. Abdul Qadir was also great to watch weaving his magic spell on the Englishmen. Another fond memory I have is when Pakistan had England at 9 for 3 at Lords, Great Cricket

  • straight6 on April 7, 2010, 4:16 GMT

    That 1982 Series was just superb and I will always have fond memories of it. I was just a little kid, but I saw Imran Khan at his best. Taking Bothams middlestump at Edgebaston for A GOLDEN DUCK was just brill! Patrick Eager brought out a book later that summer and the pictures certainly tell the story. In the Lords Test Mohsin and Mudassar got the honours, but Imran had bowled probably his best and in one particular spell which I saw with my very own eyes, Imran yorked Bob Taylor, the England keeper, full on his toes, and he got injured and play was halted. In the Headingley Test again Imran was bowling with great pace and one particular incident was the Allan Lamb incident where Imran bowled Allan Lamb a very ferocious bouncer and Lamby very nearly knocked his helmet onto his stumps by taking evasive action. Abdul Qadir was also great to watch weaving his magic spell on the Englishmen. Another fond memory I have is when Pakistan had England at 9 for 3 at Lords, Great Cricket

  • Engle on April 7, 2010, 3:35 GMT

    After Bradman and Sobers, I would venture to say that the 3rd greatest cricketer is Imran Khan. Whereas other cricketers could be emulated no matter how good they were, these 3 would be well nigh impossible to duplicate. Bradman was so far ahead of the pack of batsman, Sobers so versatile and entertaining and Imran the most overworked cricketer yet one who thrived on challenges. Fast-bowler, batsman, captain, selector, mentor, media-relations, law changer...there will never be another.

  • straight6 on April 7, 2010, 3:22 GMT

    That 1982 series was just brilliant. I was a little boy then, but i was lucky to see everything in that series. I witnessed Mohsin's 200 at Lords and Mudassar's 'Man with the Golden Arm spell'. Zaheer was threatening all series, but only had the one knock of 75, which was very delightful to watch, Tom Graveney commented that it was a typical Zaheer innings, with pure timing and great footwork. Miandad was a let down though, in a very crowded batting line of Zaheer Abbas, Majid Khan, Haroon Rashid, Wasim Raja, Salim Malik and Mansoor Akhtar. Miandad was only and only taking himself on and had a poor showing throughout, and infact had he contributed with his bat more then i'm sure Pakistan would have won the series. In the One-dayers the highlite for me was the Golden Duck Ian Botham got from an Imran Khan 'Indipper', the ball cartwheeled Botham's middlestump and Botham, who had just come out in his floppy sunhat went off saying the 'F' and 'B' word. Imran had one on Botham for sure

  • on April 6, 2010, 19:27 GMT

    Imran Khan is easily the best cricketer ever produced by Pakistan. To compare him with the likes of Ian Botham, Viv Richards, Dennis Lilee, Kapil Dev etc is unfair. They were all great cricketers and that period of play can be considered golden for cricket. Twas the period when the better was better, slogger was slogger and the best was best. Not like today where a bowler like steyn after swingiing the bowl comprehensively gets hit for a unintended four. And where a batsman like pollard hits mistimed sixes. And also where a player of Dravid's calibre is sent way down the batting order (after Uthappa). I wish that i was born in that era.

  • NK67 on April 6, 2010, 17:40 GMT

    in his autobiography david constant talks about the sikander decision saying that he mistook the noise of bat on pad for bat on ball. sounds like an honest enough mistake to me. compare that with the incredibly poor decisions down the years given by the likes of shakoor rana, khizar hayyat, & shakeel khan that have infuriated EVERY test playing country that has toured pakistan. that is not honest umpiring. that is blatant dishonesty & that played a part in neutral umpires being introduced in test cricket. why has kamran abbasi not mentioned that instead choosing to blame david constant?

  • NK67 on April 6, 2010, 17:03 GMT

    i would've been 15 when this series took place & can remember it clearly. day 4 at lords was my first ever visit to a cricket ground. fascinating series esp when you look at the make up of the two teams. england's outstanding bowler was their captain, willis. he missed the 2nd test & that was the one england lost. botham had a quiet series by his high standards. as for the batting, well i recall randall being pressed into opening. how bizarre does that look now? also has to be said that mike gatting at that stage had not scored a test 100 so to call him a "great" is a bit ridiculous. basically the england batting depended on a bit of solid batting from tavare & the elegance of gower. this would've been lamb's 2nd series & he didn't have a good series. pakistan had the more accomplished batsmen but take away mohsin's 200 & there wasn;t much left. imran had to perform heroics with the bat & ball in every test & he was on his own. hardly fair to mention umpire constant imho.

  • Engle on April 6, 2010, 15:09 GMT

    When Imran was made captain, it was with a great sense of trepidation amongst fans. Could a fast bowler, who also bats fairly well succeed with added pressure by being made captain ? And for a team like Pakistan ? Impossible, I thought. Surprise, surprise. Not only did he succeed beyond one's wildest dreams, his performances actually got better with leadership. Which is why he is so unique. No other fast-bowling all-rounders of his time (or any) could succeed as captain. Botham, Kapil, Hadlee, Kallis, Flintoff, S.Pollock never could...it's too much to ask for.

  • ianChappellFan on April 6, 2010, 14:55 GMT

    i agree with stargazer and itchy, it was not like it was not happening in pakistan as well, but it irks more when an english umpire does it since the englishmen have this religious than thou sort of air around them, the players, commentators, press and umpires. So a pak ump doing it is normal but an englishman seems strange.

    btw, no one has mentioned that the concept of neutral umpires was first introduced by imran, in a series with WI, he wanted to beat the best team in the world fair and square. he was surely ahead of his time, at that time everyone in pak complained that you are not utilizing the "home umpire advantage", against the best side in the world.

  • gallant_cricketer on April 7, 2010, 21:08 GMT

    The English performance was also commendable which only made the series more closely fought and exciting. One highlight was that Botham as a great player changed his batting style from relying on aggression to exercising patience and defense, showing that he could bat that way too.

    The Lords test included one of the fastest overs Imran ever bowled. It was his first over in the morning on the third day in which he removed Jackman, which led to England following on and ultimately Pakistan's win.

    Another comedy scene I recall is frowning face of Qadir with vehement appealing and waving of arms after hisLBW appeal against Botham was turned down. It seemed pretty close though and it made Qadir emotionally devastated.

    I do agree with the Kamran that this series was a turning point for Pakistan in that they learnt how to fight and win.

  • straight6 on April 7, 2010, 4:16 GMT

    That 1982 Series was just superb and I will always have fond memories of it. I was just a little kid, but I saw Imran Khan at his best. Taking Bothams middlestump at Edgebaston for A GOLDEN DUCK was just brill! Patrick Eager brought out a book later that summer and the pictures certainly tell the story. In the Lords Test Mohsin and Mudassar got the honours, but Imran had bowled probably his best and in one particular spell which I saw with my very own eyes, Imran yorked Bob Taylor, the England keeper, full on his toes, and he got injured and play was halted. In the Headingley Test again Imran was bowling with great pace and one particular incident was the Allan Lamb incident where Imran bowled Allan Lamb a very ferocious bouncer and Lamby very nearly knocked his helmet onto his stumps by taking evasive action. Abdul Qadir was also great to watch weaving his magic spell on the Englishmen. Another fond memory I have is when Pakistan had England at 9 for 3 at Lords, Great Cricket

  • straight6 on April 7, 2010, 4:16 GMT

    That 1982 Series was just superb and I will always have fond memories of it. I was just a little kid, but I saw Imran Khan at his best. Taking Bothams middlestump at Edgebaston for A GOLDEN DUCK was just brill! Patrick Eager brought out a book later that summer and the pictures certainly tell the story. In the Lords Test Mohsin and Mudassar got the honours, but Imran had bowled probably his best and in one particular spell which I saw with my very own eyes, Imran yorked Bob Taylor, the England keeper, full on his toes, and he got injured and play was halted. In the Headingley Test again Imran was bowling with great pace and one particular incident was the Allan Lamb incident where Imran bowled Allan Lamb a very ferocious bouncer and Lamby very nearly knocked his helmet onto his stumps by taking evasive action. Abdul Qadir was also great to watch weaving his magic spell on the Englishmen. Another fond memory I have is when Pakistan had England at 9 for 3 at Lords, Great Cricket

  • Engle on April 7, 2010, 3:35 GMT

    After Bradman and Sobers, I would venture to say that the 3rd greatest cricketer is Imran Khan. Whereas other cricketers could be emulated no matter how good they were, these 3 would be well nigh impossible to duplicate. Bradman was so far ahead of the pack of batsman, Sobers so versatile and entertaining and Imran the most overworked cricketer yet one who thrived on challenges. Fast-bowler, batsman, captain, selector, mentor, media-relations, law changer...there will never be another.

  • straight6 on April 7, 2010, 3:22 GMT

    That 1982 series was just brilliant. I was a little boy then, but i was lucky to see everything in that series. I witnessed Mohsin's 200 at Lords and Mudassar's 'Man with the Golden Arm spell'. Zaheer was threatening all series, but only had the one knock of 75, which was very delightful to watch, Tom Graveney commented that it was a typical Zaheer innings, with pure timing and great footwork. Miandad was a let down though, in a very crowded batting line of Zaheer Abbas, Majid Khan, Haroon Rashid, Wasim Raja, Salim Malik and Mansoor Akhtar. Miandad was only and only taking himself on and had a poor showing throughout, and infact had he contributed with his bat more then i'm sure Pakistan would have won the series. In the One-dayers the highlite for me was the Golden Duck Ian Botham got from an Imran Khan 'Indipper', the ball cartwheeled Botham's middlestump and Botham, who had just come out in his floppy sunhat went off saying the 'F' and 'B' word. Imran had one on Botham for sure

  • on April 6, 2010, 19:27 GMT

    Imran Khan is easily the best cricketer ever produced by Pakistan. To compare him with the likes of Ian Botham, Viv Richards, Dennis Lilee, Kapil Dev etc is unfair. They were all great cricketers and that period of play can be considered golden for cricket. Twas the period when the better was better, slogger was slogger and the best was best. Not like today where a bowler like steyn after swingiing the bowl comprehensively gets hit for a unintended four. And where a batsman like pollard hits mistimed sixes. And also where a player of Dravid's calibre is sent way down the batting order (after Uthappa). I wish that i was born in that era.

  • NK67 on April 6, 2010, 17:40 GMT

    in his autobiography david constant talks about the sikander decision saying that he mistook the noise of bat on pad for bat on ball. sounds like an honest enough mistake to me. compare that with the incredibly poor decisions down the years given by the likes of shakoor rana, khizar hayyat, & shakeel khan that have infuriated EVERY test playing country that has toured pakistan. that is not honest umpiring. that is blatant dishonesty & that played a part in neutral umpires being introduced in test cricket. why has kamran abbasi not mentioned that instead choosing to blame david constant?

  • NK67 on April 6, 2010, 17:03 GMT

    i would've been 15 when this series took place & can remember it clearly. day 4 at lords was my first ever visit to a cricket ground. fascinating series esp when you look at the make up of the two teams. england's outstanding bowler was their captain, willis. he missed the 2nd test & that was the one england lost. botham had a quiet series by his high standards. as for the batting, well i recall randall being pressed into opening. how bizarre does that look now? also has to be said that mike gatting at that stage had not scored a test 100 so to call him a "great" is a bit ridiculous. basically the england batting depended on a bit of solid batting from tavare & the elegance of gower. this would've been lamb's 2nd series & he didn't have a good series. pakistan had the more accomplished batsmen but take away mohsin's 200 & there wasn;t much left. imran had to perform heroics with the bat & ball in every test & he was on his own. hardly fair to mention umpire constant imho.

  • Engle on April 6, 2010, 15:09 GMT

    When Imran was made captain, it was with a great sense of trepidation amongst fans. Could a fast bowler, who also bats fairly well succeed with added pressure by being made captain ? And for a team like Pakistan ? Impossible, I thought. Surprise, surprise. Not only did he succeed beyond one's wildest dreams, his performances actually got better with leadership. Which is why he is so unique. No other fast-bowling all-rounders of his time (or any) could succeed as captain. Botham, Kapil, Hadlee, Kallis, Flintoff, S.Pollock never could...it's too much to ask for.

  • ianChappellFan on April 6, 2010, 14:55 GMT

    i agree with stargazer and itchy, it was not like it was not happening in pakistan as well, but it irks more when an english umpire does it since the englishmen have this religious than thou sort of air around them, the players, commentators, press and umpires. So a pak ump doing it is normal but an englishman seems strange.

    btw, no one has mentioned that the concept of neutral umpires was first introduced by imran, in a series with WI, he wanted to beat the best team in the world fair and square. he was surely ahead of his time, at that time everyone in pak complained that you are not utilizing the "home umpire advantage", against the best side in the world.

  • Reg_Dyer on April 6, 2010, 14:38 GMT

    Interesting article so I looked up the scorecard for the match. How generous of Mr Abassi and several of the other commenteers NOT to mention Botham's 9 wickets (1 more than Imran) and a first innings fifty! No doubt it was all down to the umpires.

  • JackJak on April 6, 2010, 13:52 GMT

    ..Graeme Hick and Robin Smith were two other lovely batsmen to watch more from the 90s....I remember Marshall Fractured Gatting's nose two times ..Nasser Hussain broke his hand a few times in the 90s..If some of the current Indian batsmen were to face that kind of bowling they would die in shock. Australia had lillee and thompson, terry alderman, carl rackemann, Craig mcdermott, and some good swing bowlers...Richard Hadlee and Ewen Chatfield..and much later Danny Morrison ..all were pretty decent...England had Bob Willis, Graham Dilley, Neil Foster, Ian Botham, Richard Eliison a good swing bowler

  • JackJak on April 6, 2010, 13:50 GMT

    The 80s had great quality bowling..good opening batting in the form of gavaskar, chris tavare, boycott, greenidge, haynes, boon marsh and others, good middle order classy batsmanship in the form of vivian Richards, mohinder amaranth, zaheer abbas, david gower, azharuddin, vengsarkar, salim malik, martin crowe, tendulkar, manjrekar, lara and few others...But what was so good was the bowling..Imran, Sarfraz Nawaz and Wasim and much later Waqar..West Indies with Marshall, Holding, garner, roberts..winston davis, Eldine baptiste, Winston Benjamin, Gray, Patrick patterson, Courtney Walsh, Ambrose, Bishop...and the ones before the 80s i cant name because it will go on and on:)

  • gallant_cricketer on April 6, 2010, 0:01 GMT

    In those good old college days, cricket was one of my passion and that of my buddies around. We watched or listened to (and debated) the commentary for every ball of the three test matches. Most of us believed that Imran had transformed from a wayward quickie (very much like typical Shoaib) to number one fast bowler in the world, which was also confirmed by Mike Brearly before the start of the series. Imran cleaned bowled Botham at Edgbaston in what was their long awaited first encounter. Imran bowled his heart out in all three test matches and batted with conviction throughout the series, including one of his most impressive bowling spell was at Lords but with least reward. Botham, the ashes winner in the previous season, remained defensive in the remainder of the series while Imran went on to win 2 man of the man awards as well as man of the series award. Imran himself admist that it was a tense series because he had to perform well as a new captain and also to outperform Botham.

  • shanghaibatsman on April 5, 2010, 23:52 GMT

    This is why I love cricket from the '80s

    evey side was competitive.Tests lasted more than 3 days.

  • JackJak on April 5, 2010, 13:47 GMT

    Imran was way above the others...In fact he should be Sir Imran Khan :) and not Ian Botham but then in the subcontinent we dont have these kind of things. He was the best leader/bowler/batsman cricketer the world has ever seen..I dont know about Gary Sobers because it was before time..but from all the cricketers i have seen he was the best...Maybe Wasim Akram was a bit more gifted with the ball but Imran was a complete package..handsome man, he didnt have to show off because he had the natural magnestism and personality..could bowl magical balls..had good technique as a batsman and could the best out of even mediocre players..That Makes him the Best!!!! But he played during the days when the hype was less..now cricket doesnt have any such cricketer with such class..

  • poderdubdubdub on April 5, 2010, 13:18 GMT

    Those who watched the 1982 Headingley Test will not easily forget certain umpiring decisions,those decisions were not taken under ambiguous circumstances, they were very clear. those decisions did indeed have the desired effect on the outcome of the match. I fully agree that Pakistani umpires used to dish out awful decisions but TWO wrongs dont make ONE right.

  • Itchy on April 5, 2010, 10:12 GMT

    Complain, complain - the umpire did us in and cost us the series! Please, do none of you remember any of the Pak umpires from the 80s & 90s who made any tour to Pakistan an absolute farce - one of the reasons that we now have independent umpires.

    Kamran, as has been stated by Cricketing Stargazer, it was a pity you did not focus more on Imran himself but chose to drag in an umpiring issue into the mix.

  • on April 5, 2010, 0:14 GMT

    I was not a even a teenager at the time, but I still remember, the fury of Imran, on the fourth day he had all but wiped out England, he was bowling with great fire and englishmen were falling like pins, until the umpire intervened and bailed england out by holding the play due to bad light. Imran took his sweater from the umpire with the help of his feet. The Great Khan was very angry, he knew had he been given a few more overs, England would bite dust. A new fighting era was born which eventually put Pakistan on the map of the cricket World as a major force and eventually the "cornered tigers" climbing the ultimate summit. The thing with Imran was his "fearlessness"!!!

  • on April 4, 2010, 23:20 GMT

    Imran was a true champion Leader. His aggressive approach in his batting, bowling, as well as leadership took him one step ahead of other greats like Kapil, Hadlee and Botham.

  • imran786c on April 4, 2010, 19:31 GMT

    This brings back fond memories and i was there for the triumph at Lords - the last day when "Mud" was thrown at the english. It also confirmed the longest held belief in cricket - out side England - that english umpires were just as biased and "cheating" as anywhere in the world. Another another triumph for Imran was pushing for neutral umpires which were belatedly introduced.

    One of the most understated recognition of King Khan was that during the 80s - Pakistan never lost a series against arguably the greatest team ever assembled on a cricket pitch - the Windies with Lloyd, Greenidge, Haynes, Richards, Murrey / Dujon, Roberts, Croft, Holding, Garner, Marshall etc.

    If only we can get one more Khan...................

  • CricketingStargazer on April 4, 2010, 19:09 GMT

    It's a pity that this article is distracted from its priase of a true great player - Imran Khan, it his best, was a phenomenon - by raking up, once again, a single decision as being evidence of some undocumented conspiracy against teams from the sub-continent. As if there have never been wrong decisions that have gone their way some time.

    Celebrate the man. Celebrate his greatness and a series that the England players recognised as a very tough one that could have gone either way. And celebrate the way that even playing for an ameteur university side in England he was able to lift that side to the best results that it has ever had.

  • Umair86 on April 4, 2010, 18:50 GMT

    For me.. All 4... Kapil, Hadlee, Botham and Imran were absolute treat to watch.. imran nd Kapil having more sweet action... Imran tough my fav among the 4... Aggressive and the immense eye for talent and vision that he had.. amazing for the game of Cricket...

  • fwb67 on April 4, 2010, 18:34 GMT

    2nd Test at Lord's was the test match that changed Pakistan Cricket. Imran Khan led from the front in this series taking 21 wkts. We could have won the 3rd test at Headingley but for Constant, that biggest hurdle between victory & defeat. Revenge was taken 5 years later under Imran Khan (Tiger) at the same venue Headingley Pakistan Winning the test Imran taking 7-40 & match figures of 10-77. England lost the first series ever to Pakistan in England in 1987. I watched the Lord's & leeds 1982 & the Leeds 1987 Test. That was the team that delivered at every situation whether it was Saleem Yousuf or Abdul Qadir. Qadir took Ten Wkts at the Oval 1987. Imran Khan was the best captain ever Pakistan produced after Abdul Hafeez Kardar & Mushtaq Muhammad.

  • on April 4, 2010, 18:15 GMT

    I hope Pakistan comes back as one of the most dynamic cricket playing countries. In win or loss, one always enjoys Pakistan Cricket. This is not because I am Pakistani-American, I have been told this by numerous friends from India, UK, Australia and the Caribbean. I know Imran has chosen a higher path to serve the country and I wish he succeeds. I pray that Pakistan cricket gets a leader like him, skillful, passionate and fearless. I feel depressed at the state of Pakistan's cricket, however, believe me things are taking a turn for better in Pakistan and it will have a positive impact on cricket as well. Kamran thanks for taking us through such nostalgic memories, please keep doing it.

  • cantexplain on April 4, 2010, 17:32 GMT

    Thanks Mr Abassi - good article! This series was a watershed for both Pakistan cricket and the batting career of Imran Khan. I'v read a lot about this series, but was too young at the time to follow it - would love to watch it ball by ball now on DVD. Both Imran and Botham were at their respective peaks, and this was the first series in which Botham was overshadowed by an opponent not named IVA Richards. Imran dominated every match in the series, including Lords where he took only 4 wickets. His two MOM awards, 21 wickets and 200+ runs in the 3 tests were great individual accomplishments, but the his biggest contribution was his leadership in making the team believe in themselves.

  • BRNUGGET on April 4, 2010, 17:21 GMT

    Memories, memories came rolling back into my mind when i read the article THough i was upset it was short. Today's players are fortunate to have many protections but players like Imran and Viv had little. imran Khan is one of the game's true all time greats, magnificent fast bowler, superb batter and adequate fielder. And what a captain he was. It was he who made PAKISTAN a team what it was during the 1980s and early 1990s. It was because of him Pakistan won so many times then and was a true great team. The turmoil of today Pak cricket makes me think what it would be if Imran was playing and was the skip. Players like Imran come once in a while and i am glad he was of my childhood time. Top of it what a looker he was, a ladies man in every sense of the word. None like him today. Thanks Immy for great entertainment.....memories and fun...

  • on April 4, 2010, 16:56 GMT

    GreAt LeaDER, Awa$ome teAm .. hope our CuRRenT TeAm cAn tAke A leAp fRM Imran KhAn'$ BooK !!!!!

  • demon_bowler on April 4, 2010, 16:47 GMT

    A good read, but what a shame this splendid recollection is marred by a continuing grudge against umpire David Constant. Time to forgive and forget!

  • Hassan.Farooqi on April 4, 2010, 16:41 GMT

    Imran is also a racist, egotist, and a very self obsessed person. He firmly believed that the reason for Pakistan's being mediocre was it lacked pacemen because only the Pathan race can produce fast bowlers. Unfortunately for his prediction, when Pathans started playing cricket, they produced along line of quality batsmen like Younis Khan, Shahid Afridi, Yasir Hameed, however they produced only a medium pacer Umer Gul. The best pacemen were ethnic Punjabies or ever Mohajirs (e.g. Sami), but never Pathan.

    He also thought the problem was in domestic cricket which was departmental, instead of regional. The department cricket was destroyed making cricketers un-employed and looking for other things to earn money. All in all, he is a racist lacking vision.

  • Hamayoun on April 4, 2010, 16:25 GMT

    Thanks for this, I remember the whole series really well. The whole series was so painful to watch, this must have been the zenith (or should that be nadir?) of Pakistan's inconsistency. Pakistan lost the 1st test, a scrappy affair, then had a great 10 wicket win at Lords, with Mohsin Khan getting a double century. Our hopes of a first series win in England were really high going into the decider, and as a Pakistani living in England at the time, I could feel the tension. We managed a slight first innings lead, and then fell 3-2 in the second innings, and 115-6. From there, it was game over, despite an almost heroic bowling performance from Mudassar Nazar which almost got us the win. I still remember the heartbreaking quote from captain Bob Willis after England had won... "They thought they were the better team, but now we know different".

  • Zahidsaltin on April 4, 2010, 16:00 GMT

    I have watched since 1972 and can tell you that there never have been a better sight of a fast bowler running into the bowling crease. The most I admire in Imran was his leadership and how hi lifted his own game after becoming captain. Lifting his batting averages from 25 to 52 and bettering his bowling averages from 25 a piece to 20 per wicket. He was gracefull, stylish and highly competent cricket player and stands yards above all other 3 great allrounders of his time.

  • asim900 on April 4, 2010, 14:43 GMT

    Imran Khan was really a wizard of Oz for the cricket in Pakistan...He changed the face of cricket here and played with real zeal and passion which many before him never played.His captaincy is still considered the best..I still remember Pakistan cricket team winning world cup in 1992 under his leadership as he was an astute leader..

  • Cool_Jeeves on April 4, 2010, 13:01 GMT

    A pity that this series of articles is written in such a cramped manner. Imran Khan, in my opinion, is the greatest cricketer of all time, blindingly talented, courageous, exemplary leadership qualities, and above all, the Pakistan team was a tremendous team a good 3-4 years after Imran Khan left. In days when scoring a century against West Indies was a very big deal, Imran Khan did that and produced 6 tests of incredible intensity against the West Indies led by Viv Richards, with both teams winning 2 test each. Today's cricket looks pedestrian by comparison. A longer article would have been more enjoyable. The previous one on Gavaskar was also inadequate, especially since it omitted mention of the miraculous innings in Ahmedabad test of 1983, which was played on what Clive Lloyd called the worst pitch he had seen in his career. Nevertheless, in an age where every cricketer is compared to Bradman, no less, am grateful that someone remembered a truly great hero.

  • Saulat on April 4, 2010, 12:35 GMT

    I Love This Article .. Thanks For SharinG .. Keep It Up .

  • allblue on April 4, 2010, 12:19 GMT

    I remember the series well, and as an England fan I still wince at some of David Constance's decisions. He was actually a very good umpire, but he really did seem to have a problem with Pakistan. Still, we have neutral umpires now, so everybody's happy, right? Reading the article did make me feel a bit nostalgic for those 'old-style' Tests, where a batsman with poor defensive technique wasn't a batsman at all, and where every run mattered. Modern attack minded cricket is great of course, but oh for wickets that give the bowler a chance. Test runs should be gold coins, not small change.

  • Bigglesworth on April 4, 2010, 10:59 GMT

    Thanks for Kamran Abbasi's article about the 1982 Headingley test. I worked in Pakistan 1990-94, played cricket on two test grounds - Hyderabad and Karachi Defence - went to watch the World Cup in Australia, cheered Pakistan on in the semi-final vs New Zealand, and watched their triumph in the final, meeting Imran Khan a few weeks later at the British High Commission in Islamabad. (I stayed in Melbourne at the same hotel as the Pakistan team and it was good to see the day after the final Fairbrother and Gooch poolside with half the victors.) I long to see political stability in Pakistan and a resurgence in Pakistan cricket. But can we bury references to the imperialist past and to umpiring deficiencies - on both sides - and take joy in our mutual love of the greatest game in the world. Let us not inflame passions the way that journalists do.

  • on April 4, 2010, 8:41 GMT

    Hi,was living in Geneva at that time.Had subscribed to cricket channel to watch our gallant heroes.Imran was/is a disciplinarian a bit cocky at times (like the victory speech after the world cup) but what a captain,kudos to the man.What a wastage as a politician,should have concentrated on cricket and given back to cricket/country from where he attained fame/name.Anyone from the present lot who can become like Imran???We need few educated cricketers,cant we pluck someone studying/living Pakistani or Origin living abroad?Penny for a thought PCB.Mehdi- Singapore

  • asaduzzaman-khan on April 4, 2010, 8:33 GMT

    Very few times, I saw Imran playing (live) because, I was so young when he retired. But I have read much about cricket history, watched archives of cricket online and in DVD. Imran is one of the finest cricketer of all time. Super fast bowler, reliable batsman and above all the greatest leader. As a complete cricketer, Imran is in only comparable to Sobers. I think, only he can save Pak cricket at this moment with his great cricket sense and leadership. Make him board president, then you will see...... everything is OK.

  • on April 4, 2010, 5:53 GMT

    I have the series on Dvd, Mohsin Khans 200 at Lord's. One of the best series in England.

  • on April 4, 2010, 5:52 GMT

    Was reading hoping that Pakistan actually won. How many times does an Indian feel a little sad to hear Pakistan losing a Test match. I felt this time, to reading to the end of this article.

    I can gauge the despair that it must have been for the Pakistani supporter all too well though, having witnessed numerous such moments of Indian cricket (Bangalore 1986, Chennai (Madras) 1999).

  • T31932 on April 4, 2010, 5:17 GMT

    Excellent article...Imran Khan was the backbone of Pakistan cricket from the late 70's to mid 80's until the likes of Wasim arrived on the scene. Even Miandad did not step up as much as Imran (as a side not, I am a bigger fan of Miandad than of Imran). Imran is the only man who can bring some class back to the PCB. Pakistan should use former players in more executive roles. Imran should take over Ijaz Butt's position and Inzamam should be his protege. These two players know how to properly deal with player attitudes or how to mentor youngsters. PCB has taken some good steps by appointing Waqar as head -coach and Afridi as captain. Next it should bring in Imran and Inzi as the leaders of the PCB administration.

  • kaiser1 on April 4, 2010, 4:37 GMT

    I've watched it all live on tv if the gentleman had watched it on the ground. I was a teenager in my high school days. I had a passion which developed watching this Cheetah of Pakistan who was chosen as the leader of the team which had the infighting as we witnessed in the recent days. Someone similar is needed to inspire the team now to scale the heights as it did during Imran days. I'm still hoping for the best for the Pakistan as a country in general and as a cricketing nation in particular. I will keep hoping for the best because everything rests on the silver lining amid darkest clouds. May Allah bless our nation.

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  • kaiser1 on April 4, 2010, 4:37 GMT

    I've watched it all live on tv if the gentleman had watched it on the ground. I was a teenager in my high school days. I had a passion which developed watching this Cheetah of Pakistan who was chosen as the leader of the team which had the infighting as we witnessed in the recent days. Someone similar is needed to inspire the team now to scale the heights as it did during Imran days. I'm still hoping for the best for the Pakistan as a country in general and as a cricketing nation in particular. I will keep hoping for the best because everything rests on the silver lining amid darkest clouds. May Allah bless our nation.

  • T31932 on April 4, 2010, 5:17 GMT

    Excellent article...Imran Khan was the backbone of Pakistan cricket from the late 70's to mid 80's until the likes of Wasim arrived on the scene. Even Miandad did not step up as much as Imran (as a side not, I am a bigger fan of Miandad than of Imran). Imran is the only man who can bring some class back to the PCB. Pakistan should use former players in more executive roles. Imran should take over Ijaz Butt's position and Inzamam should be his protege. These two players know how to properly deal with player attitudes or how to mentor youngsters. PCB has taken some good steps by appointing Waqar as head -coach and Afridi as captain. Next it should bring in Imran and Inzi as the leaders of the PCB administration.

  • on April 4, 2010, 5:52 GMT

    Was reading hoping that Pakistan actually won. How many times does an Indian feel a little sad to hear Pakistan losing a Test match. I felt this time, to reading to the end of this article.

    I can gauge the despair that it must have been for the Pakistani supporter all too well though, having witnessed numerous such moments of Indian cricket (Bangalore 1986, Chennai (Madras) 1999).

  • on April 4, 2010, 5:53 GMT

    I have the series on Dvd, Mohsin Khans 200 at Lord's. One of the best series in England.

  • asaduzzaman-khan on April 4, 2010, 8:33 GMT

    Very few times, I saw Imran playing (live) because, I was so young when he retired. But I have read much about cricket history, watched archives of cricket online and in DVD. Imran is one of the finest cricketer of all time. Super fast bowler, reliable batsman and above all the greatest leader. As a complete cricketer, Imran is in only comparable to Sobers. I think, only he can save Pak cricket at this moment with his great cricket sense and leadership. Make him board president, then you will see...... everything is OK.

  • on April 4, 2010, 8:41 GMT

    Hi,was living in Geneva at that time.Had subscribed to cricket channel to watch our gallant heroes.Imran was/is a disciplinarian a bit cocky at times (like the victory speech after the world cup) but what a captain,kudos to the man.What a wastage as a politician,should have concentrated on cricket and given back to cricket/country from where he attained fame/name.Anyone from the present lot who can become like Imran???We need few educated cricketers,cant we pluck someone studying/living Pakistani or Origin living abroad?Penny for a thought PCB.Mehdi- Singapore

  • Bigglesworth on April 4, 2010, 10:59 GMT

    Thanks for Kamran Abbasi's article about the 1982 Headingley test. I worked in Pakistan 1990-94, played cricket on two test grounds - Hyderabad and Karachi Defence - went to watch the World Cup in Australia, cheered Pakistan on in the semi-final vs New Zealand, and watched their triumph in the final, meeting Imran Khan a few weeks later at the British High Commission in Islamabad. (I stayed in Melbourne at the same hotel as the Pakistan team and it was good to see the day after the final Fairbrother and Gooch poolside with half the victors.) I long to see political stability in Pakistan and a resurgence in Pakistan cricket. But can we bury references to the imperialist past and to umpiring deficiencies - on both sides - and take joy in our mutual love of the greatest game in the world. Let us not inflame passions the way that journalists do.

  • allblue on April 4, 2010, 12:19 GMT

    I remember the series well, and as an England fan I still wince at some of David Constance's decisions. He was actually a very good umpire, but he really did seem to have a problem with Pakistan. Still, we have neutral umpires now, so everybody's happy, right? Reading the article did make me feel a bit nostalgic for those 'old-style' Tests, where a batsman with poor defensive technique wasn't a batsman at all, and where every run mattered. Modern attack minded cricket is great of course, but oh for wickets that give the bowler a chance. Test runs should be gold coins, not small change.

  • Saulat on April 4, 2010, 12:35 GMT

    I Love This Article .. Thanks For SharinG .. Keep It Up .

  • Cool_Jeeves on April 4, 2010, 13:01 GMT

    A pity that this series of articles is written in such a cramped manner. Imran Khan, in my opinion, is the greatest cricketer of all time, blindingly talented, courageous, exemplary leadership qualities, and above all, the Pakistan team was a tremendous team a good 3-4 years after Imran Khan left. In days when scoring a century against West Indies was a very big deal, Imran Khan did that and produced 6 tests of incredible intensity against the West Indies led by Viv Richards, with both teams winning 2 test each. Today's cricket looks pedestrian by comparison. A longer article would have been more enjoyable. The previous one on Gavaskar was also inadequate, especially since it omitted mention of the miraculous innings in Ahmedabad test of 1983, which was played on what Clive Lloyd called the worst pitch he had seen in his career. Nevertheless, in an age where every cricketer is compared to Bradman, no less, am grateful that someone remembered a truly great hero.