July 12, 2010

A result that will resonate

The encounter in Bristol was one between a team that was expected to win and one that, importantly, wanted to win
27

There was a time, not so many months ago, when England's standing in one-day cricket was so low that one of the game's most spurious statistics might actually have been worn as a genuine badge of honour. How spectacular the irony, then, that in the very same season that they finally appeared to get their act together in limited-overs cricket, England squandered their 100% record against Bangladesh with a performance that reeked of the very complacency that their previous efforts had not been able to justify.

Until Saturday's nerve-shredding second ODI in Bristol, England had finished on the winning side in every one of their 20 previous international encounters with Bangladesh - often emphatically, occasionally unconvincingly, and every so often, such as at Mirpur back in March, by the skin of their teeth.

But it was a run of results that came with an inbuilt "just you wait" clause, because the law of averages dictated that such a string of successes could not be carried on indefinitely, even against a team with such lowly expectations as Bangladesh. Sure enough, at the 21st attempt, England received, in the words of the Mail on Sunday, a "full custard pie to the face", delivered with lashings of whipped hubris, and accompanied by a large dollop of mocking laughter, particularly from the direction of St John's Wood, where the recently defeated Aussies are preparing to take on Pakistan at Lord's.

Simply put, England expected to win, but Bangladesh wanted to win, and gloriously, that extra desire gave them the edge they needed to slice through their opponents. If England dropped their guard for this fixture - and everything from their team selection to their attitude in the field suggests that they did - then they failed to take into account Bangladesh's burning desire to finish a tough year with some tangible evidence of progress.

Until Bristol, Bangladesh's 2010 record, in all forms of the game, was P24 L24 - figures that gave no clue of the visible signs of development within a talented but naïve core of players. Tamim Iqbal's sensational solos, allied to the combative class of Shakib Al Hasan, had gone some way towards tilting the perception of a team that, in the past, had been all-too-easily cowed, but unfortunately the only sporting currency that the Bangladeshi public deals in is victory. The impatience for success was in danger of causing another set of babies to be thrown out with the bathwater.

The pressure of the spotlight had already had a detrimental effect on Shakib, who was relieved of the captaincy on the eve of the tour to enable him to concentrate on regaining his status as the No. 1-ranked allrounder in world cricket. And to judge by the increasingly world-weary pronouncements of their Australian coach, Jamie Siddons, the frustrations of constant defeat were clearly grating after two-and-a-half years at the helm. Now, however, he's had his Cardiff 2005 moment - this is a result that will resonate, no matter what happens in the series decider at Edgbaston, and no matter how deaf the wider world may be to Bangladesh's struggle for acceptance in the top tier of the game. And the confidence it will imbue in the squad ahead of the 2011 World Cup is unquantifiable.

It is claimed that one swallow does not make a summer. Whoever scripted that proverb knew nothing of Bangladesh cricket, for single swallows have been the country's stock-in-trade since its earliest years of international status - the 1997 victory over Kenya that landed the country its epoch-making ICC Trophy title, and the 1999 World Cup win over Pakistan that led directly to Test status.

Throw Cardiff into the mix, plus Tamim's coming-of-age against India at the 2007 World Cup, and there, in a nutshell, is the tale of the tape so far. To suggest that beating England in England slots straight into the top five would be no exaggeration whatsoever. The frisson of getting one over the old colonial masters is an added factor that cannot, and will not, be overlooked either.

To suggest that beating England in England slots straight into Bangladesh's top five would be no exaggeration whatsoever. The frisson of getting one over the old colonial masters is an added factor that cannot, and will not, be overlooked either

No matter how shocked and self-recriminating Andrew Strauss proved to be after the match, England have known all year that they had to be wary of such a result, especially having pulled themselves out of a nose dive in that Mirpur fixture back in March. Eoin Morgan eventually sealed that match by two wickets in the final over with a bloodless unbeaten century, and as Tamim later admitted, Bangladesh's players "cried like babies" in the dressing room afterwards - a candid insight into an emotionally fuelled squad, and a hint, perhaps, that they wouldn't let another opportunity that good go begging.

The man who bit the bullet on that luckless occasion was the 20-year-old Shafiul Islam, whom Shakib had brought in to the attack with 16 runs to defend, but whose first five balls were all that Morgan needed to complete the job. On Saturday, his personal redemption was completed when he found the edge of Jonathan Trott's bat with five runs and three balls still to come. For the captain, Mashrafe Mortaza, the payback ran even deeper. England were his opponents, at Chittagong way back in October 2003, when he suffered the knee injury that has devilled his progress ever since.

Given the decrepit state of the Bangladesh squad as it made its way south from Nottingham on Thursday night, what happened at Bristol is even more remarkable. And yet it clearly takes a pretty special set of circumstances for a team so used to beatings to enter a match with absolutely nothing to lose. A similar scenario worked in their favour when they overturned New Zealand for the first time in 2008, despite having lost the services of 15 players to the rebel Indian Cricket League.

After the England series is wrapped up, Bangladesh's attentions turn to the lower tier, with two ODIs against Ireland, and one apiece against Scotland and Netherlands, a trio of countries they need to put in their place to satisfy the demands of those who would seek to strip them of their elite status. But whatever the result of those fixtures, they are not due back in Britain for a full international tour until 2020, which makes their latest West Country heist all the more timely.

Andrew Miller is UK editor of Cricinfo.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Rooboy on July 14, 2010, 5:44 GMT

    @Bang_La, why do you take offence and make 'smart' comments to anyone who simply points out the facts regarding Bangladesh's performances? It's a sad indictment that you honestly think anyone would be 'scarred' by a single loss in a meaningless game. If this was the case then you must be out of room for any more scars on your 'red rear'. Good win by B'desh to beat Aus at the time, but it was FIVE YEARS AGO. Winning World Cups and countless other series tends to make the events of Cardiff fade into insignificance, and while it was highly embarrassing at the time, I think you're deceiving yourself if you seriously think any 'hurt' remains from that game. Anyway, why not gloat about a more recent Bangladesh victory over Aus? Oh ...

  • redneck on July 14, 2010, 0:55 GMT

    @Bang_La, mate from an aussie perspective that whole winter in 05 stung! and while your correct in history isnt always relevant. the point of what i was saying is england cant get too hung up on that loss and needed to go stamp their authority all over bangledesh so not to give them any edge going into a world cup in which they are co hosting. i think england did exactly what needed in the 3rd match! just as the aussies did in manchester after cardiff.

  • ww113 on July 13, 2010, 12:30 GMT

    Bangladesh win an ODI against a major side once every few years.It is news because they are still so bad.

  • PottedLambShanks on July 12, 2010, 15:53 GMT

    Is it just a coincidence that we only hear from Andew Miller when England lose?

  • Rob334 on July 12, 2010, 15:31 GMT

    @MisterDavid - If Bristol isn't the West Country - where the hell is it? From Brizzle born and bred

  • EddyM on July 12, 2010, 14:17 GMT

    normal service resumed???

  • RSG476 on July 12, 2010, 12:54 GMT

    In a way, this win against England was coming for Bangladesh for quite some time now, given their performance in the last few months and series. I also think that in Tahmim, Shakib and others, they have the nucleus of a pretty good side. Where Bangladesh need to look inwards is the lack of players who have consistently done well eg got an average of 30 in Test Cricket - till date I think only Habibul Bashar is up there for anyone who has scored more than 1000 runs. Once that happens, and the young team bonds together, there should be many more such occassions. The greatest recognition will come when such one off wins are no longer treated with the delight (however understandable) and may I suggest, a sense of over-achievement, as done now

  • on July 12, 2010, 10:21 GMT

    Bangladesh must show some consistency now. They have created the upsets but it has come after long stretches of disappointment. Middle-order must play to potential now for them to show some more positive signs. They looked good half-way in the opening half of their batting but they lost some momentum in 2nd half. They need to capitalize on the batting powerplay overs.

  • on July 12, 2010, 10:12 GMT

    oh my gosh ! that really hit hard to some England fans here ! lost one in 21 matches and writing stuffs that indicates the emptiness of their head. Okay, we lost 20 and won one.But we cherish the one.Why shouldn't we? It was a well earned win? And neither did we claim that we are the best,or anything? Please let enjoy this rare moment and be a part of it rather than being complex and dumb. Al loss does not do harm to you,but a win makes us smile and happy.isn't it?

  • Bang_La on July 12, 2010, 10:12 GMT

    Andrew!!! We heard that you invited rain to Birmingham? Why? Weren't two umpires help enough? hahahahaha

  • Rooboy on July 14, 2010, 5:44 GMT

    @Bang_La, why do you take offence and make 'smart' comments to anyone who simply points out the facts regarding Bangladesh's performances? It's a sad indictment that you honestly think anyone would be 'scarred' by a single loss in a meaningless game. If this was the case then you must be out of room for any more scars on your 'red rear'. Good win by B'desh to beat Aus at the time, but it was FIVE YEARS AGO. Winning World Cups and countless other series tends to make the events of Cardiff fade into insignificance, and while it was highly embarrassing at the time, I think you're deceiving yourself if you seriously think any 'hurt' remains from that game. Anyway, why not gloat about a more recent Bangladesh victory over Aus? Oh ...

  • redneck on July 14, 2010, 0:55 GMT

    @Bang_La, mate from an aussie perspective that whole winter in 05 stung! and while your correct in history isnt always relevant. the point of what i was saying is england cant get too hung up on that loss and needed to go stamp their authority all over bangledesh so not to give them any edge going into a world cup in which they are co hosting. i think england did exactly what needed in the 3rd match! just as the aussies did in manchester after cardiff.

  • ww113 on July 13, 2010, 12:30 GMT

    Bangladesh win an ODI against a major side once every few years.It is news because they are still so bad.

  • PottedLambShanks on July 12, 2010, 15:53 GMT

    Is it just a coincidence that we only hear from Andew Miller when England lose?

  • Rob334 on July 12, 2010, 15:31 GMT

    @MisterDavid - If Bristol isn't the West Country - where the hell is it? From Brizzle born and bred

  • EddyM on July 12, 2010, 14:17 GMT

    normal service resumed???

  • RSG476 on July 12, 2010, 12:54 GMT

    In a way, this win against England was coming for Bangladesh for quite some time now, given their performance in the last few months and series. I also think that in Tahmim, Shakib and others, they have the nucleus of a pretty good side. Where Bangladesh need to look inwards is the lack of players who have consistently done well eg got an average of 30 in Test Cricket - till date I think only Habibul Bashar is up there for anyone who has scored more than 1000 runs. Once that happens, and the young team bonds together, there should be many more such occassions. The greatest recognition will come when such one off wins are no longer treated with the delight (however understandable) and may I suggest, a sense of over-achievement, as done now

  • on July 12, 2010, 10:21 GMT

    Bangladesh must show some consistency now. They have created the upsets but it has come after long stretches of disappointment. Middle-order must play to potential now for them to show some more positive signs. They looked good half-way in the opening half of their batting but they lost some momentum in 2nd half. They need to capitalize on the batting powerplay overs.

  • on July 12, 2010, 10:12 GMT

    oh my gosh ! that really hit hard to some England fans here ! lost one in 21 matches and writing stuffs that indicates the emptiness of their head. Okay, we lost 20 and won one.But we cherish the one.Why shouldn't we? It was a well earned win? And neither did we claim that we are the best,or anything? Please let enjoy this rare moment and be a part of it rather than being complex and dumb. Al loss does not do harm to you,but a win makes us smile and happy.isn't it?

  • Bang_La on July 12, 2010, 10:12 GMT

    Andrew!!! We heard that you invited rain to Birmingham? Why? Weren't two umpires help enough? hahahahaha

  • MisterDavid on July 12, 2010, 10:07 GMT

    Once and for all Andrew, BRISTOL IS NOT IN THE WEST COUNTRY!!!!!!!

    Otherwise, good article.

  • EddyM on July 12, 2010, 10:06 GMT

    I don't think that Bangladesh go out to win matches. They try not to lose too badly.

    They got lucky against England, no doubt about it. But they cannot rely on getting lucky once or twice a year to win matches. They got lucky against the West indiies when the WIndies went on strike.

    They don't really try to push oin for that bigger score to give themselves a decent chance. Look at the first ODI. They were sitting pretty with 10 over to go, but they didn't go for it aiming to get 270-280. They were happy getting 240-250, then relying on getting lucky. The powerplay was left until the last 5 overs for the tailenders to hit out.

    They don't take that chance to go for it because they are afraid of getting thrashed (again). Say it only come off 25% off the time, then they have a decent chance to win 25% of their games.

    Happy not to lose too heavily isn't good enough.

  • jackiethepen on July 12, 2010, 9:37 GMT

    England dropped their guard in team selection? This was the same team minus Trott and plus Tredwell that won the previous game handsomely! Miller was so busy sneering at Ian Bell in his assessment of that game that he missed the quality of Bell's perfectly paced not out innings which won the game. Trott isn't Bell as everyone came to realise but his bat did give us a chance. It was Kieswetter, Yardy, Wright, the usual suspects that failed with the bat once Morgan didn't deliver his usual rescue package. If Bell hadn't broken his ankle and continued in his fine form then England would have chased down the total. Without him the team seems in disarray. But it's simply because Morgan can't do it every time. It became clear to most fans that England needed a batsman with Bell's quality - ignored by Flower for too long (and Miller). Bangladesh read their opponents right and seized their opportunity. They have a good set of bowlers underestimated by the media and held their nerve.

  • Bang_La on July 12, 2010, 9:30 GMT

    @ redneck: What a great historian you are and how correct about the fact after Cardiff! But you know what? history is such a vile monster,once it dug its teeth into your red rear and bite off the chunk of meat off, the scar always remains. Day "after-Cardiff" did not heal the Cardiff scar on your butt and will raise its ugly head on every occassion. Don't you agree Mr. Historian? Is it what hurt most, sir?

  • on July 12, 2010, 9:26 GMT

    I don't know why people comment on this things that a team can't control. Bangladesh didn't told England that give rest to your best players: KP and Swann. KP is just pathetic with left arm spin (i you remember his dancing in the crease in the Test series and as well one dayers) and Yardy was proven good in his business. Only what can Bangladesh do: they can win the decider and tell this people who are suspicious of Bangladesh victory "Next time come with your best kids".

  • Bang_La on July 12, 2010, 9:18 GMT

    Ah, its our lad Andrew, who else? :) The makeshift bars in Chittagong still pays!! Good, good. Here you go, "................ but unfortunately the only sporting currency that the Bangladeshi public deals in is victory. The impatience for success was in danger of causing another set of babies to be thrown out with the bathwater." Is it really true only for Bangladesh public? Do not the Adrenaline rush hunters from all around the world, in various forms, ask the same? Why blame poor Bangladesh public who do not have many occassions to celebrate? But hey, great GREAT piece again. Thank you.

  • 68704 on July 12, 2010, 8:57 GMT

    I think this is fantastic for Bangladesh but it is a timely reminder for England who beat an underprepared Australia and went to town about it. This English team is better than the earlier sad lot but it is hardly a world beating side. Many of the current team like Kieswetter and Luke Wright are hugely overrated . I think it is too early to brand Eoin Morgan as the next , more elegant Michael Bevan who finished more matches for Australia than anyone else and that is not an easy mantle to wear. Jonathan Trott as one of my young friends sarcastically said "is Michael Bevan minus the finishing!. Now will the momentum shift to Australia for the ashes? I think too much was made of a one off , out of season serie win and England have come back to their normal one day form after the 4th one dayer vs Aus. England may have invented the game and crow about their recent successes, but they have miles to go before winning the world cup after all they havent managed for 34 years. Sridha

  • crussher on July 12, 2010, 8:45 GMT

    'One Swallow does not make a Summer' came from Aristotle and related to the necessity to practice the life of virtue continuously throughout one's whole life.

  • on July 12, 2010, 7:35 GMT

    ahh i didnt know about the injuries tausif cheers for pointing that out,but still mate i hope this isnt a repeat of 2005,back then everyone was hailing a turn around in bangladeshs fortunes after beating that full strength ausi team X),i seriously wish the bangladeshi`s all the best for the future though cuz its healthy for the overall cricket game. Mushi is a very VERY important player for bangladesh(saw him in the tests with some good performances),hope they actually go in the right direction this time around with there upcomming matches(they probobly will win as the matches arent with any of the big 8).All that being said i wonder,how different things could hav been if bell hadnt broken his foot :)

  • tauhid_aks on July 12, 2010, 6:24 GMT

    I watch all Bangladesh's matches, wasting my night's sleep. I think my waking up till midnight on Saturday did not end in a fiasco. I feel good that the tigers won, but unfortunately, most people in out country are obsessed with football, unlike India. Cricket is not yet the popular sport. I was thoroughly insulted as I told my friends to watch Bangladesh-England on Saturday instead of FIFA world Cup. I know it is a great achievement for the Tigers, but why there is no celebration? Media is also publishing the Tigers' success in a very precise news. Bangladesh is not in Football World Cup, so why ppl r so crazy?

  • ostad on July 12, 2010, 6:14 GMT

    This game was won with Tamim & Shakib not batting in their ways, Ashraful as usual for last many games,and Mushfiq not keeping the wicket......, which means the team as a whole, is improving.This team is no more about particular player or players.....

  • on July 12, 2010, 6:12 GMT

    Mishaal, don't forget that Bangladesh was weakened too by the injuries to Mushfiqur Rahim, who is not only the full time keeper, but also the person who often provides the impetus at the very end of the innings where nowadays Mahmudullah and Ashraful appear to be practising for test matches. And also, the last minute injury to Raqibul Hasan, who at recent times have proved more than a handful against England. If you take form of the best players into comparison, our dangerman Tamim played a next to nothing role in this particular match, and the score we ended up with was atleast 40 runs shy of what should have been given the platform at the end of thirty overs. So to be perfectly honest, Bangladesh could not play their best side, and the performance was not at the very best, but yet it proved enough to beat the English...

  • on July 12, 2010, 6:04 GMT

    One slight flaw in an otherwise excellent article: "The pressure of the spotlight had already had a detrimental effect on Shakib, who was relieved of the captaincy on the eve of the tour to enable him to concentrate on regaining his status as the No. 1-ranked allrounder in world cricket."

    Shakib does not need to regain his status. He is still ranked the number 1 allrounder, albeit not by the same 100 miles as he was before...

  • shams1882 on July 12, 2010, 5:48 GMT

    Iindeed it's a story of one sparrow making it all for Bangladesh for a long time and thanks to Andrew Miller for recognizing how difficult it is Bangladeshis to manage a win after facing a sea of odds. English media will never spare a thought for the whipping boys of the world cricket when they sip their cup of tea each morning and delve into a furor to prove how inadequate the case is for Bangladeshis to play test crikcet. Infact who in a sane frame of mind will spare a thought after siphoning off the wealth of a country for two centuries and leaving a heap of malnutriton-suffering people to fend their luck against all the calamities. Is it not a wonder of modern world when Bangladesh manages to get sparse wins when a bunch of teens often rared in the extreme poverty take on opponents of double their size - knowing only the best of all sporting facilities? But if history is true to its teaching the wait for the other sparrows will be over soon and it will be turn for BD boys to whip.

  • redneck on July 12, 2010, 5:46 GMT

    every good team drops their game once in while. just like the aussies did in cardif in 05. however they went on to bowl bangledesh out for 130 odd in their next meeting a couple of days after and won by 10 wickets. england need to do simmilar in todays match to put bristol behind them!

  • Trigger_Tiger on July 12, 2010, 5:12 GMT

    As a Bangladeshi fan, I myself could not have put this any better Andrew. you have no idea how much we, the Bangladeshi fans, look forward to your articles! You have the thorough understanding and know the cultural and emotional essence that lie within us Bangla fans that ties to cricket. An amazingly perfect article!

    Now all Bangladesh have to do, is win or go down swinging HARD tomorrow and then see the Ireland, Scotland and Netherlands fixtures off with ease =)!

  • on July 12, 2010, 4:24 GMT

    well done bangladesh,but lets look at some facts,Kevin peiterson isnt playing along with swann and bell was already handycapped,so basicaly bangladesh didnt face a strong team. That being said i hav to bring about their victory over the ausies back in 2005 when they pretty much shocked everyone beating ricky pontings men with a full strength team(its true gillespie was on the downfall at the time but still the rest of the team was still there on the field),now that victory was somthing special,but here we are 5 years later,sure they hav the likes of tamim iqbal and shakib but other then that they still arent where they should be by now,how much longer will this "improving" thing last=/,andrew ur articules are always well written but its overdone mate X).Now that i hav gotten the cynical comments out of the way i hope bangla do build on this victory and get some wins under there belt. Cricket as a whole will be better for it.

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  • on July 12, 2010, 4:24 GMT

    well done bangladesh,but lets look at some facts,Kevin peiterson isnt playing along with swann and bell was already handycapped,so basicaly bangladesh didnt face a strong team. That being said i hav to bring about their victory over the ausies back in 2005 when they pretty much shocked everyone beating ricky pontings men with a full strength team(its true gillespie was on the downfall at the time but still the rest of the team was still there on the field),now that victory was somthing special,but here we are 5 years later,sure they hav the likes of tamim iqbal and shakib but other then that they still arent where they should be by now,how much longer will this "improving" thing last=/,andrew ur articules are always well written but its overdone mate X).Now that i hav gotten the cynical comments out of the way i hope bangla do build on this victory and get some wins under there belt. Cricket as a whole will be better for it.

  • Trigger_Tiger on July 12, 2010, 5:12 GMT

    As a Bangladeshi fan, I myself could not have put this any better Andrew. you have no idea how much we, the Bangladeshi fans, look forward to your articles! You have the thorough understanding and know the cultural and emotional essence that lie within us Bangla fans that ties to cricket. An amazingly perfect article!

    Now all Bangladesh have to do, is win or go down swinging HARD tomorrow and then see the Ireland, Scotland and Netherlands fixtures off with ease =)!

  • redneck on July 12, 2010, 5:46 GMT

    every good team drops their game once in while. just like the aussies did in cardif in 05. however they went on to bowl bangledesh out for 130 odd in their next meeting a couple of days after and won by 10 wickets. england need to do simmilar in todays match to put bristol behind them!

  • shams1882 on July 12, 2010, 5:48 GMT

    Iindeed it's a story of one sparrow making it all for Bangladesh for a long time and thanks to Andrew Miller for recognizing how difficult it is Bangladeshis to manage a win after facing a sea of odds. English media will never spare a thought for the whipping boys of the world cricket when they sip their cup of tea each morning and delve into a furor to prove how inadequate the case is for Bangladeshis to play test crikcet. Infact who in a sane frame of mind will spare a thought after siphoning off the wealth of a country for two centuries and leaving a heap of malnutriton-suffering people to fend their luck against all the calamities. Is it not a wonder of modern world when Bangladesh manages to get sparse wins when a bunch of teens often rared in the extreme poverty take on opponents of double their size - knowing only the best of all sporting facilities? But if history is true to its teaching the wait for the other sparrows will be over soon and it will be turn for BD boys to whip.

  • on July 12, 2010, 6:04 GMT

    One slight flaw in an otherwise excellent article: "The pressure of the spotlight had already had a detrimental effect on Shakib, who was relieved of the captaincy on the eve of the tour to enable him to concentrate on regaining his status as the No. 1-ranked allrounder in world cricket."

    Shakib does not need to regain his status. He is still ranked the number 1 allrounder, albeit not by the same 100 miles as he was before...

  • on July 12, 2010, 6:12 GMT

    Mishaal, don't forget that Bangladesh was weakened too by the injuries to Mushfiqur Rahim, who is not only the full time keeper, but also the person who often provides the impetus at the very end of the innings where nowadays Mahmudullah and Ashraful appear to be practising for test matches. And also, the last minute injury to Raqibul Hasan, who at recent times have proved more than a handful against England. If you take form of the best players into comparison, our dangerman Tamim played a next to nothing role in this particular match, and the score we ended up with was atleast 40 runs shy of what should have been given the platform at the end of thirty overs. So to be perfectly honest, Bangladesh could not play their best side, and the performance was not at the very best, but yet it proved enough to beat the English...

  • ostad on July 12, 2010, 6:14 GMT

    This game was won with Tamim & Shakib not batting in their ways, Ashraful as usual for last many games,and Mushfiq not keeping the wicket......, which means the team as a whole, is improving.This team is no more about particular player or players.....

  • tauhid_aks on July 12, 2010, 6:24 GMT

    I watch all Bangladesh's matches, wasting my night's sleep. I think my waking up till midnight on Saturday did not end in a fiasco. I feel good that the tigers won, but unfortunately, most people in out country are obsessed with football, unlike India. Cricket is not yet the popular sport. I was thoroughly insulted as I told my friends to watch Bangladesh-England on Saturday instead of FIFA world Cup. I know it is a great achievement for the Tigers, but why there is no celebration? Media is also publishing the Tigers' success in a very precise news. Bangladesh is not in Football World Cup, so why ppl r so crazy?

  • on July 12, 2010, 7:35 GMT

    ahh i didnt know about the injuries tausif cheers for pointing that out,but still mate i hope this isnt a repeat of 2005,back then everyone was hailing a turn around in bangladeshs fortunes after beating that full strength ausi team X),i seriously wish the bangladeshi`s all the best for the future though cuz its healthy for the overall cricket game. Mushi is a very VERY important player for bangladesh(saw him in the tests with some good performances),hope they actually go in the right direction this time around with there upcomming matches(they probobly will win as the matches arent with any of the big 8).All that being said i wonder,how different things could hav been if bell hadnt broken his foot :)

  • crussher on July 12, 2010, 8:45 GMT

    'One Swallow does not make a Summer' came from Aristotle and related to the necessity to practice the life of virtue continuously throughout one's whole life.