Osman Samiuddin
Sportswriter at the National

Shoaib Akhtar retires

It's the colour we remember, Shoaib

Over 13 years Shoaib Akhtar played too few Tests, had too many injuries, got into too much trouble but left behind indelible memories

Osman Samiuddin

March 17, 2011

Comments: 62 | Text size: A | A

Shoaib Akhtar erupts after Kamran Akmal dropped Ross Taylor behind the stumps, New Zealand v Pakistan, Group A, World Cup, Pallekele, March 8, 2011
Even the World Cup, his swansong, has not been without incident for Shoaib Akhtar © Associated Press
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Eventually we all get old and the bad times matter less. The last year of Shoaib Akhtar's career has held this one truth of life in it. There have been the usual disciplinary scrapes till the very end. In this World Cup alone, he has been the single biggest contributor to the team kitty of fines; usually for harmless breaches of curfew but also once for a scrap with Kamran Akmal after the Ross Taylor drops.

But something about Shoaib over the last year or so has somehow placed him in a different light. Maybe it's because he has been in the spotlight less than he once used to be. It has been good for him. Maturity might not be the right word; an expansion of the mind is probably a better way of putting it. With no other cricketer in the current side can you have, for example, a conversation about the troubles that ail Pakistan the country, not the cricket. There are some moments when he veers into spheres inhabited by cranks, but many reasoned ones also, words and thoughts of a man who has travelled the world and taken it in, not kept it out as so many of Pakistan's players have.

He was never a monster really, though it wasn't either simply that he was misunderstood. His private life should always have remained his private life but he retains the self-obsession of most celebrities, which make precisely that a difficult balance to achieve. He speaks regularly of how difficult it is for him to live a regular life in Pakistan. He probably doesn't want it any other way.

Perhaps he has just come to terms with not being able to do what he used to, not being who he once was. Even the run-up was shortened last year in the Asia Cup, in his most improbable comeback ever, something he would have considered an affront to his masculinity just two years ago. He even told a tale recently of offering advice to Mohammad Amir two years ago on how to cope with what was about to happen to his life. Amir didn't take it up apparently and who would've blamed him: Shoaib Akhtar, the role model for adjusting to celebrity, doesn't quite work.

But if you look now at what Amir has done and scour through the worst episodes of Shoaib's life, you can only be reminded of what the noted Pakistani writer Nadeem Farooq Paracha pointed out once. Corruption in Pakistan cricket has tainted all kinds of men including some who cloak it with great righteousness and morality. It is not the least of Shoaib's achievements that for everything he has done, he has never done this, as he pointed out repeatedly in his farewell. An obsessive, clingy patriotism drove him in this regard and it still does.

This is all necessary to record because increasingly the man Shoaib is at least as, if not more, compelling than the cricketer Shoaib. The story of his cricket is well-formed, but hollow. Surgeons across the world are richer for him, as are lawyers, but not spectators and his teams, who didn't get enough. Over 13 years he has only 46 Tests to show, missing almost as many as he played. He was a fabulous sight and a fine bowler, much smarter and better rounded than the image he himself created and encouraged, of the fastest bowler on the planet.

 
 
He will be missed as a cricketer, but equally as man, as character, as the very colour that cricket, and professional sport, needs because eventually, when we get old, it's the colour we remember.
 

There was nothing sustained about it, peaks occurring suddenly and randomly so that the memories are bright still: Kolkata, the 1999 World Cup, Colombo against the Australians, the 2005-06 England series to name a few. They are just not as plentiful.

If we weren't satisfied, he said he was, "with a few exceptions." Who are we to disagree with that? Only he knows what he has gone through to get to where he is at, and as a life all told, he is right to consider it successful. He spoke so honestly and touchingly of how playing for Pakistan was such a dream, of how cricket changes a young man's life entirely in Pakistan - "we learn swimming, driving, anything you name it we learn from there [cricket]" - that you are reminded how much a single Test, let alone a 13-year career, means. Everything else "was written in my life and it had to happen."

His body has now given up. Yet in the last year he has put together the second-longest unbroken sequence of ODI appearances of his career. That has come from nothing but spirit, because each over takes more out of him. He hasn't bowled badly at all, the brain taking over fully; as in life, so too in cricket. He may or may not play again and it will be a shame if that 28-run over of tired full tosses is the last one he bowls.

He will be missed as a cricketer, but equally as man, as character, as the very colour that cricket, and professional sport, needs because eventually, when we get old, it's the colour we remember.

Osman Samiuddin is Pakistan editor of ESPNcricinfo

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Posted by   on (March 20, 2011, 1:22 GMT)

O Shoaibyyyyy...........i am gona miss you man.........i was thinking to face you soon in some cricket but good for me.......coz i don wan someone to blow my face.....as you could evryone knws.......Love you man......well i play for middlessex U19....hopefully might catch you in some training or coatching...

Posted by sAm2sAm on (March 19, 2011, 2:55 GMT)

Dear Osman, excellent piece to read. A charming adieu to a truly colorful and historical cricketer in PK's cricket.

Shoaib Akhtar will always be remembered as a "bad boy" of cricket who loved his country. I think last of the true aggressive fast bowlers of 70's, 80's and 90's era. Now we have seamers, swingers, but we might never have fast bowlers, who can make batsmen heart skip a beat or two when they charge in, who can break the poor wooden stumps in two, who can hit the toes and make batsmen kiss the ground. RESPECT is th word that comes to mind when i think of Shoaib's retirement.

Posted by   on (March 19, 2011, 2:08 GMT)

The most enjoyable bolwer of the decade!!! Shoaib Akhtar , you were the best. Good luck and God speed in everything that you choose to do after retirement from International cricket.

Posted by dr_salman on (March 18, 2011, 20:22 GMT)

he ll be missed...keep aside all the controversies...he was bold, brave, aggressive, honest n straightforward...n not a hypocrite atleast !! its the color that ll be remembered !!

Posted by sheffieldstars on (March 18, 2011, 20:12 GMT)

shoaib always rocked lahore and london

miss u mate

xxx

Posted by sillygenius on (March 18, 2011, 20:10 GMT)

Wonderful cricketer and a wonderful person as well... We need crickters who has heart like shoaib has... fearless cricketer... Love you boss...

Posted by   on (March 18, 2011, 13:50 GMT)

It was a beautiful tribute to Shoaib. He will be missed. I hope we all remember him for everything he was. A super rockstar of a fast bowler who could destroy any batsman in the world. Shoaib Akhter was a piece of art.

Posted by adlus on (March 18, 2011, 10:09 GMT)

Dear Osman, you wax eloquent every time. It's a pleasure to read your articles.

Posted by indianxpres on (March 18, 2011, 8:28 GMT)

He is one of fastest we have seen from pak. his inswinging york deliveries is delight to watch. He is a match winner. we will remember it for long time Shoib..

Posted by   on (March 18, 2011, 7:58 GMT)

Beautifully written.. Osman Samiuddin you sure know how to put colour into writing..

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Osman SamiuddinClose
Osman Samiuddin Osman spent the first half of his life pretending he discovered reverse swing with a tennis ball half-covered with electrical tape. The second half of his life was spent trying, and failing, to find spiritual fulfillment in the world of Pakistani advertising and marketing. The third half of his life will be devoted to convincing people that he did discover reverse swing. And occasionally writing about cricket. And learning mathematics.

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