'Dhoni transformed from villain to hero in seconds'

Former players and writers take up the cudgels for and against the issue surrounding Ian Bell's reprieve at Trent Bridge

August 1, 2011

Comments: 32 | Text size: A | A

Much to the surprise of everyone at the ground, Ian Bell emerged from the pavilion after tea, England v India, 2nd npower Test, Trent Bridge, 3rd day, July 31, 2011
Ian Bell: "To walk off for tea was stupid. I have learned a lot of lessons" © Getty Images
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"It was very naive of me to assume the ball was dead. I didn't hear the umpire call 'over'. To walk off for tea was stupid. I have learned a lot of lessons."
A contrite Ian Bell says it was his mistake

"Bell would be having tea now."
To Ravi Shastri, the batsman should have been given out without the unnecessary drama that followed

"I think if there were more captains like Dhoni you could get back to the days of the phrase, 'It's just not cricket.' He's set an example for the other captains."
Sunil Gavaskar, the former India captain admires Dhoni's decision

"If it was me I'd have run him out and let him think long and hard about remaining in his crease until the ball is dead while sitting on the balcony watching others score the runs he should have."
No spirit of cricket nonsense for former England allrounder Ian Botham

"Dhoni did a great job by recalling Bell to bat after tea. According to law, Bell was rightly given out but he never intended to take the fourth run. It shows a great spirit from the Indian team."
Sourav Ganguly, the former India captain, applauds India's generosity

"On behalf of the ECB I wish to express the England and Wales Cricket Board's grateful thanks to the BCCI and the India team."
The ECB chief executive David Collier is relieved not to be dealing with a diplomatic incident

"All I can say is, thankfully it was the Indian players who had to make the call not the BCCI!"
Former England captain Tony Greig has a dig at the power usually wielded by Indian cricket

"There are times when it's your inner call that tells you what is right. I really appreciate Dhoni's decision to call Bell back."
Former India captain Gundappa Viswanath backs Dhoni

"Ian Bell was being very casual, almost careless, walking off before a definitive call from umpire for boundary or tea and deserved to be out."
Former India batsman Sanjay Manjrekar would have preferred the law to have applied here

"The big issue about 'the run out that wasn't' hasn't been mentioned yet. I had already started a cheese sandwich, so it was definitely tea."
While everyone else shouts and screams, cricket's funnyman Graeme Swann solves the knobbly problem with perfect logic

"There is no black and white here. We all feel warm and fuzzy, but Ian Bell has learned a good lesson - don't be dozy."
Shane Warne would have been happy with whichever way MS Dhoni would have chosen to go

"It wouldn't have been nice if it happened to one of our batsmen, and when you see it on TV, probably the right thing was done."
Rahul Dravid puts himself in Bell's shoes

"As a captain I think I would have appealed just as Dhoni did - he had every right to appeal. But I also think I would have been talked around at tea time for the good of the game. "
Michael Vaughan, the former England captain, puts himself in Dhoni's shoes

"Dhoni transformed from dastardly villain to sporting hero in seconds. Hurrah for him and for Test cricket. What human activity comes close?"
British actor Stephen Fry relishes the drama of the occasion

"It's a strong statement to captains around the world to play a certain way. If spirit of cricket existed you wouldn't have half the appeals."
Television commentator Harsha Bhogle wants others to follow Dhoni's example

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by drdatla on (August 4, 2011, 12:53 GMT)

when srikkanth batted defensively n wentout of the crease to pat the pitch in his debut test the english didnot have any qualms in running him out.they even joked aboyt his foolishness.different standards for differnt teams. raghav

Posted by AdnanSiddiqui on (August 2, 2011, 16:39 GMT)

Imran Khan did the same gesture against India in 1999..Srikanth was given LBW by the umpire, so there was not doubt about the decision...Srikanth didn't look happy with the decision..Imran going beyond his jurisdiction, against umpire's decision...let Srikanth return to the pitch and got his fate on the next ball. It can be viewed at this link>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v​=toFIXXkpgMo

Posted by   on (August 2, 2011, 16:19 GMT)

Fraz, Inzi did not even complete the run! And he used his bat to stop the ball! The ball was thrown to hit the stumps!

Different scenerio, please do not compare!

Posted by   on (August 2, 2011, 14:21 GMT)

It's a strong statement to captains around the world to play a certain way. If spirit of cricket existed you wouldn't have half the appeals."

Posted by HemanthReddyYalla on (August 2, 2011, 13:53 GMT)

Really it was a great move byM.S.DHONI.Almost everyone praised the Indian captain.But it was the England cricketer,Ian Bell,who actually should have had accepted that he was out.

Posted by   on (August 2, 2011, 13:48 GMT)

Hats off to MS Dhoni and team India for showing great gesture to recall Ian Bell on the crease by taking back the run out appeal. Nothing taking back from Team India, but I recall the same respectable gesture was not shown twice against Inzimam ul Haq. At that time he was not taking run but he was protecting his body against a wild throw when he was in the crease. Once he was jumped in the air inside the crease. Those two run out decisions were shocked for any cricketer.

Posted by Andrew0000 on (August 2, 2011, 12:03 GMT)

I think Dhoni did the right thing i.e. he asserted the legal position by appealing and then reversed it during the break to avoid bringing the game into disrepute.

My view is that the rules should be such that players and captains are never (or as little as possible) required to make those judgement calls in the heat of the moment when the implications of those decisions can have a long lasting impact on the game.

I think the rules should expressly state that confusion, ignorance etc shall not absolve a player from being dismissed and that the opposition side should not be required to consider recalling the batsman etc. That way the lawmakers make the judgement call on what is considered to be in the spirit of the game and the fielding side is not called upon to make that moral decision and can focus on playing cricket, which is what they are there to do. Hopefully this would avoid players and teams becoming pariahs for following the laws of the game to the letter.

Posted by   on (August 2, 2011, 12:00 GMT)

I think it is childish that English coach+captain went to Indian dressing room asking them to reconsider their appeal. Bell made an error and he should be out. Why ask the opposition to change their appeal if your batsman has made an error? Isn't that simple? Besides English were not that sporting when they appealed for Inzamam to be run out when taking evasive action to avoid the ball hitting him. Typical English mentality: " whatever we do is right and what other do is wrong".

Posted by nz_malc on (August 2, 2011, 11:09 GMT)

Funny how the tables have turned. I don't recall England withdrawing their appeal after running out Grant Elliot in an ODI against NZ a few years ago after the bowler knocked him over as he was running between the wickets. Double standards methinks.

Well done Dhoni. I have a lot of respect for him.

Posted by   on (August 2, 2011, 10:44 GMT)

I think it is childish that English coach+captain went to Indian dressing room asking them to reconsider their appeal. Bell made an error and he should be out. Why ask the opposition to change their appeal if your batsman has made an error? Isn't that simple? Besides English were not that sporting when they appealed for Inzamam to be run out when taking evasive action to avoid the ball hitting him. Typical English mentality: " whatever we do is right and what other do is wrong".

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