September 7, 2011

'Will Fletcher risk annoying a lot of people in India?'

Nasser Hussain looks at the challenge ahead of his former coach, his own experience as a British Asian captaining England, and how to balance cricket's three formats
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Duncan Fletcher's first major series as the India coach has been disastrous. But one man knows what Fletcher is capable of. Nasser Hussain was the England captain during the first five tough years of Fletcher's tenure as their national coach. During India's tour of England, Hussain spoke to ESPNcricinfo about what Fletcher brought to the table, the difficulties he could face in India, the need to play less cricket, and about his own Asian roots

Has your identity as a British Asian been a part of how your career turned out? What did it mean to you? Did you think of yourself as the man who broke the glass ceiling for cricketers of Asian origin in Britain?
I dunno if I broke the glass ceiling or anything like that. I know I'm very proud of doing it [becoming England captain]. I still remember practising in the outfield of the Chepauk stadium with my brothers. I know how much it meant to my dad that someone from that situation - where he bowled balls to me at the Madras Cricket Club - ended up captaining England. And that is a great story for me and my family, and I am very proud of that.

The only issue is that I've always considered myself English and British, but I do realise I've been a bit of a role model for British Asians. I think I've enjoyed the fact that I am of mixed race. It's a great combination: the fire and passion of Indians and their cricket is from my dad, but also the English schooling system and the English system as a whole gave me great opportunities.

I didn't really come up against any racism. In Essex, I played in a middle order with Nadeem Shahid and Saleem Malik, and you see Ravi Bopara there now. A lot of that Ilford British Asian community has always progressed well.

The most important thing I take from my dad is the realisation that what you do is very important. The game of cricket is very important. I used to hate it, and I still hate when people say, "Oh, it's just a game." See, what happens when you lose a Test match or whatever, it's more than a game. So the appreciation of the game and how important it is came from my dad, and I always took that everywhere. Even if I played a benefit game in Essex or a charity game, I would be upset if I was out for 5 or something like that. It is important if you put all this effort into it, the passion and everything that goes in. You might as well do it properly.

Did you not have to fight your British Asian identity when you were growing as a player? Or did it grow with the cricketer?
I never really fought it. The only time I had to fight it was when I was in India, very proud of being half-Indian or whatever you want to call me. The appreciation and the love of the Indian fans and a little bit of the curiosity of how this boy from Madras ended up going on to captain England. I had to keep reminding myself that I was the England captain and my main priority was to win games for England and not to try and win over the Indian fans and be nice to all of India.

So that is the only time you had to battle a little bit. You had to still realise what your main job is, not worry too much about the fairytale and the dream of going back to India with your dad and all these things. It was only on one tour [2001], the time I took my dad back to Madras was the tour that I captained. There was a lot of love, and the Madras Cricket Club put on a great function for me and my dad. We were made honorary members. I was very proud of that and had to remind myself the next day that I was the England captain trying to beat India. You don't fight it, but you just realise that's your given job and you have to go out and do it.

Duncan Fletcher

In hindsight, what did Duncan Fletcher bring to the table for England?
Fletcher, first of all, was an outsider, which was very important to English cricket. English cricket was always driven by people in the game. They had played the game, they ran the game, they were involved in some way. Some were looking inward, some were just so busy trying to save their jobs, they weren't doing their jobs.

I think that's a sign of madness if you carrying on doing things just because you've done that before. So Dunc came in with new ideas. He'd been out of the game for a while. He brought in business ideas to the team, man-management ideas, structures. It wasn't just the captain and coach, there was a structure below the senior players. Younger players would sit and make decisions on everything: on what time we were going out, how many nets, how much we'd train, what we'd wear to High Commission functions, etc.

Selection was massive. He changed selection. Like, Stuart Broad at the beginning of this series had a poor three-six months. In the olden days, no way Broad would have played [the first Test against India]. In the olden days the media would be writing, Broad must be dropped, Broad must be dropped And he would be dropped because people were worried that if that's what the media is saying and you go against that… The media had a massive influence. It is you that puts your head above the parapet, not Broad. It would be you, as selector or chairman of selectors.

Fletcher said, "Forget all that. If I want to pick a player, I want to pick him as an investment, not for just one week, one Test match. I am picking him as an investment for the future. I want to know how good he's going to be in one year, two years' time." So he picked up people who had average records, like [Michael] Vaughan, [Marcus] Trescothick, [Steve ] Harmison and [Andrew] Flintoff. They weren't pulling up trees in county cricket or whatever. But he had a good eye for a player and an investment for the future. And because we had some success, and winning those tours in Sri Lanka, Pakistan - four series - it gave us time to get these lads bedded in.

"The one thing Greg [Chappell] tried to do was to change the culture a little bit. To try to make a younger, fitter team. So how does Fletcher take on players and make really important decisions that will really annoy a lot of people in India?"

Duncan's got great technical skills, and I can name a dozen occasions where he's looked at a player and got him spot-on. I won't name names but there's was a player on our first tour of South Africa, and he looked at him at a net and said, "Ah, Allan Donald will get this lad out a lot on this tour. He won't get many runs." And he didn't get many runs.

He picked on Mohammad Yousuf in Cape Town, and he said to Jimmy Anderson: full outswinging delivery early on. Bowled him, cleaned him up. Duncan has a great eye for technical weaknesses and strengths of players. He's insightful, he's new, he's fresh-thinking, or he was back then.

I do wish him well with the Indian team. I do think they have got their right man, because he has to go on that path again with India now.

Would you say the two international coaching situations he's had to go into are actually similar - England and India? People wouldn't think so.
The situations are similar and dissimilar: England back then were rock bottom. India are not, they are still a good side. They have just had two bad months. But they are papering over the cracks if they don't think that in Test cricket they have a long fight here to get back to No. 1.

The biggest difference is [that] in English cricket, he was the main man. If he said he was going to do something, we did it. Now if he gets back to India, it is how much they will let him do things off his own back. That will be the decision they will have to make and he will have to make: whether he takes on people in India or not.

By that do you mean he's one of those coaches who believe that in some cases he must actually be more powerful than the captain? Was that a part of your equation then?
No. Duncan was still old school, where the captain was the main man. It's a very English way - the captain is always the main man. But because I had such great respect for him and what I saw him achieve with us, I would... bow down's an exaggeration, but if he wanted something, or he had a vision or he had a player, I would say, "Dunc, you've got the last five right, so you are going get this one right too", and I'd go with it. He'd get it right occasionally and he's probably made mistakes on this trip. But in my time he got more right than wrong. I would be strong about certain things, but other things I would say, "I'll go with you."

But [his case is] even more different with Dhoni. Dhoni has to be the main man. Like I say, his record is so good, so exceptional, that he has got to be the main man in leading India forward, with Fletcher by his side.

Have you wondered how it's going to work out for Fletcher, even other than his equation with the BCCI?
I have wondered... The one decent thing he had with us is that he had done three to four years of county cricket with Glamorgan. So the players I mentioned, he knew the ingredients. He'd seen Trescothick get a 150 against Kallis bowling very quick, so he made a mark... not that he ever thought he'd be England coach, but he made a mark. When he was England coach, he immediately turned to me and said, "You know, one lad Trescothick." I hadn't even heard of Trescothick. I'd seen him a bit. And I said, "Oh, okay, all right."

So that's going to be his issue - how much of the young players of India has he seen? And he will need to see. I do wonder how it will go for him. I wish him well, because I think he can do a good job if he is given the tools.

What about personality-wise? Will he adjust to working in the Indian cricket environment?
Well, that's again going to be difficult for him. He rubbed people up the wrong way in England, and he still does. And he is a very stubborn man, doesn't bow down to the press, makes a lot of enemies, doesn't suffer fools gladly. Very stubborn. He still won't speak to certain people who have messed him up over the years, and he comes across - even though I know him as completely different - to the English media as quite a sort of sourpuss, and he's not. He's got a good sense of humour, he's a good guy.

The main thing was that he took on the counties. A lot of what is happening here [in the England v India series] is down to Duncan. Before Duncan, Angus Fraser and Darren Gough were bowling on a Monday and Tuesday before a Test match - a little bit like India. We were having knackered bowlers, who had either not played a lot or played too much, and Dunc said, "No, Thursday of a Test match, they must be fit."

In our counties, it was like the England football team - Arsenal, Liverpool are bigger than England. That's how it was. We used to be in the England dressing room and players were still putting on Ceefax [to check] how's Essex going, how's Middlesex? And I was like, I'm not interested here, this is England, we're playing Australia. So Dunc used to ring up Somerset and say, "Sorry, Andrew Caddick is not playing next week." And they are trying to win the Championship, so it was a massive thing.

There was a Northants chairman who was asked which would he prefer: Northants winning the Championship or England winning the Ashes, and he said Northants winning the Championship. That was the mentality Dunc had to take on, and it made him very unpopular with counties. But he took them on and he rested the players. And look now, it's all moved on and that's just normal now. He changed our culture a little bit.

The point is, can he do that in India? You know, with all respect, and I don't want to get into the Greg Chappell-Ganguly thing, the one thing Greg tried to do was to change the culture a little bit. To try to make a younger, fitter team. But how do you? The players are bigger than the coach in India, so how does he [Fletcher] take on players and make really important decisions that will really annoy a lot of people in India? But he will view it as the right thing to do.

Was the clout of the counties the biggest hurdle England had to overcome to get to where they are today?
Definitely. Because every decision we made had to be voted on by the ECB cricket committee, which consisted of the counties. It was like turkeys voting for Christmas; it was a difficult thing to get by. They were almost voting to put themselves secondary to the England team. That was the major mindset change. We had the players, who wanted to change, but we needed the counties and the ECB to buy into the fact that the main focus must be the England cricket team and everything must be secondary to that. It took a long time, a lot of arguments, but eventually we got there.

Because of the success of the team?
Yes, and I think the chairman of the board, Lord MacLaurin, bought into that. He was a very clever man. He came in from business. He came in from Vodafone, Tesco. He said, "Okay, I'll give you that, but in return I want something: I want you to behave like businessmen, want you to dress smartly. I'll give you single rooms. I want you be clean-shaven. If I'm paying you extra and looking after you, I want you to be ambassadors for your country and put in performances as well."

It was a bit of a give-take situation. Fletcher being stubborn helped. If he hadn't been so stubborn, he [may] have buckled and said, "No, right, let's not do this." And we would have gone back. Fletcher could have thought, "I'm in my job, I've lost a couple of series, I'll look after myself", but he didn't. He never tried to look after himself. He kept plodding on, and other people behind the scenes - Geoff Miller, one of the selectors then, he's now national selector, was very helpful in driving all of that. You need everyone buying into it, including people within the team.

We also had good ex-captains like Atherton and Stewart, who didn't come with any kind of needle and bitterness and say, "In our time we didn't..." Like, why didn't we have it this easy? It could have stirred those two, but it didn't. And [there were] also good guys within the team. Every team needs good guys. Not your best players, I'm talking about players who aren't legendary, but guys like [Paul] Collingwood and [Ashley] Giles and [Craig] White, people who would lead the way in England going in the right direction.

Twenty20

What's the best way for the world game to handle three formats? Greater financial benefits for playing Test cricket? Does Twenty20, with its mushrooming domestic leagues, need to be trimmed down?
I enjoy international Twenty20, and I've heard a few - some very good names - say you shouldn't have international T20. I was in the World T20 in South Africa for the India-Pakistan final, I was at Lord's for the Sri Lanka-Pakistan final, and I was at the Australia-England final in Barbados. These were great occasions, great sport. The other day at Old Trafford was a sell-out, and it was a very good game. I think international T20 works. I just believe some of the domestic tournaments, I just think they've just overdone it.

"People go to a Test match to see bowlers bowl at 95 miles an hour because they know they know they can never bowl a 95-miler. If they are just going to go and see medium-pacers they see in club cricket, what's the fuss all about?"

I mentioned the IPL, but even in England there are far too many games for our domestic players. They are doing far too much travelling and too much cricket. They will be exhausted as well. Everyone is trying to get the money in. Counties are struggling, the IPL is a lot of big bucks. What I would say to any administrator is, "Yes, you do have to balance the books, yes, as administrators you are also looking at how much money you are bringing in, but also look at the future of the game. You are in charge of it." I think Bradman said all players and administrators are in charge of this game.

Then you look at the standard and quality of bowling we are now left with. Is it a coincidence or is it just a fact that the amount of cricket being played is eventually taking its toll on bowlers? Michael Holding would look after his body - he still looks after his body. He wouldn't bowl too much when he played county cricket, he was saving it up for the West Indies.

There is a real lack of fast bowling. Bowling has diminished in the last five years, and I think the volume of cricket has taken its toll on bowling. Bowlers really put bums on seats. People want to see Ambrose and Walsh in, McGrath, Warne, Donald, Pollock, Akhtar, Gul, Kumble, Srinath, these sort of guys, Murali. People would love to see Brett Lee running in at Virender Sehwag, or Shoaib Akhtar at Sachin Tendulkar. People want to see things they can't do themselves. People go to a Test match to see bowlers bowl at 95 miles an hour, because they know they know they can never bowl a 95-miler. They can't face anyone at 95 miles an hour. If they are just going to go and see medium-pacers they see in club cricket, they know that was good, but what's the fuss all about?

I do believe as administrators they are going to have to say enough is enough. I do believe we can sell every day of the calendar, especially in India. People will soon say we need quality instead of quantity.

You're saying it's not about how you split up cricket's financial pie but containing the number of limited-over games and keeping the bowlers fresh is what should matter most?
Just less cricket, generally. I don't know how many days a year we are playing now. Look at India's schedule: World Cup, the IPL, they had a tour of the West Indies, a tour of England, they have a home series against West Indies, ODIs against England, then away to Australia. They haven't got that rest yet.

Of course, I too get disappointed if I put on the telly and there's no cricket on, but you have to learn to wait. It's like a treat. You have to learn to wait to watch Sachin bat. He's not there every night, you wait to watch him bat.

If it's just there all night, every night, I think you are overkilling it. I do believe you can cut down one-day cricket. You don't need seven ODIs and a couple of T20s. Have three one-dayers and three T20s or something like that. T20 will sell itself, you'll have sell-out crowds everywhere. All these ODIs will be sold out too, but that doesn't mean you have to do it just because it's bringing in money.

Hussain on leadership, the rise of England, the captaincy styles of Strauss and Dhoni, and more in part one of the interview here

Sharda Ugra is senior editor at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY Jaggadaaku on | September 9, 2011, 18:28 GMT

    Both England and India's coaches are Zimbabwean, but look at their gap of performances. Well, in my opinion, only successful cricketer could become the successful coach. If Duncan doesn't know how to bat or bowl, how would he teach others? Duncan's highest score was 91 in his entire FIRST CLASS career of 111 matches and grabbed 10 wickets haul just once, never got selected for Tests. He played only 7 ODIs and made 191 runs with the strike rate of 66.08 (Too low for ODIs). What this guy will teach Sehwag who carries 50+ average in Tests with the strike rate of over 80? Duncan only can teach/coach him to play slower like he used to play. And what he would teach Sachin, Gambhir, Dravid who carry 50+ test averages? India was so stupid enough to hire this guy who was struggling when he was a player. India should hire someone who was successful in his time, so Indian players could not have any arguments but listen to him and follow his rules.

  • POSTED BY OliverWebber on | September 8, 2011, 19:20 GMT

    A very interesting interview, as ever. What's strange about so many of the Indian fans is that their response to defeat and a bad tour seems automatically either to insult the opposition or to make excuses. What on earth is the point of that? When England have lost heavily (eg Australia 2006-7) fans and the media were unanimous in criticising the team and talking about what changes needed to be made. We didn't go about saying "Wait till you're in England, we'll see who's boss then", or "That was unfair, your pitches/weather etc favoured your bowlers", or "We didn't have enough warm-up matches, it was a conspiracy by Cricket Australia". We said "Jeez guys, what a terrible performance by England, let's figure out what went wrong and try to make sure it never happens again." Result? A gradual transformation to the successful team we now have. I sincerely hope England meet a strong India in the return series - and a change of attitude would be the first step.

  • POSTED BY Alexk400 on | September 8, 2011, 18:08 GMT

    Nothing wrong with nasser , it is just that indian fans/public has thin skin. Nasser was telling the honest truth that indian fielding is no good. if Nasser said in simple english , no one would have noticed. indian fielding is worse than donkey and donkey should get offended in first place. THE FACT IS SELECTED INDIAN CRICKETERS ARE NOT ATHLETIC. it is always the case in past 60 years. Not sure why. if i guess one thing , it is lack of abundent energy , when people have less energy they save it for core skills. Fielding is thankless job in indian cricket. Hahaha. For duncan fletcher to succeed , he has to find a real fast bowler.Oldies sooner or later will retire but he need a bowler who can remove tails. Until then his coach spot is iffy.

  • POSTED BY NairUSA on | September 8, 2011, 17:59 GMT

    @Yevghenny - I do not disagree with you. Team India's performance has enabled every retired english cricketers to come out of the woodwork to appease the english cricketing public in the hope of regaining their lost lustre. Yes, it is a reflection of the times.

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 16:53 GMT

    @ amit that was a very interesting point you raised there about rising above system and thats why we rely on individuals.

  • POSTED BY NairUSA on | September 8, 2011, 16:50 GMT

    @Pete Munday - Nasser appears to be a great bloke for the english public and his observations are probably good for them. However, there is no denying the fact that he is seeking easy publicity. Period. As I said, the Indian team, with their dismal performance is a good target for these faded cricketers. Team India has given enough ammunition to the likes of Nasser who was hoping for a something to tag on to for reviving their popularity. As for your comment, I will hold on to the 'mythical' chip that you are referring to. LOL. You are indeed funny.

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 14:01 GMT

    Politics->BCCI->MSD->Players->Fletcher- He can't do de job. buckle up :-)

  • POSTED BY samonly007200 on | September 8, 2011, 12:24 GMT

    Who cares about what Naseer Husain has to say about India. The man is short tempered and shoul not be commentating. Learn to talk first. After donkey saga... The chanels will think twice before hiring him...

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 10:25 GMT

    NairUSA - I Think its time you took that massive chip off your shoulder. What you term slander is simply factual analysis , do you expect the media to pull their punches just because it might upset those Indian fans who refuse to accept the evidence of their own eyes.

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 10:10 GMT

    get rid of Sachin, Laxman, gambhir (he let his country down when he played injured in the IPL), Zaheer, Munaf, Vinay, Vijay, Bhajjie Mishra

    let Dravid and Sehwag and dhoni be the nucleus of the new team.

    1. Rohit sharma must play every test 2. dont discard raina yet. Send him back to the nets for a year. Do the same with sreesanth

    3. No IPL for the India squad.want to play then leave Indian team

    team: - Sehwag, Mukund, Dravid, Kohli,Rohit Sharma, Rayadu, parthiv(as batter), Dhoni, Rohit Sharma(spinner), ozha, Aron, ishant, R. P. Singh praveen Kumar, Irfan pathan

  • POSTED BY Jaggadaaku on | September 9, 2011, 18:28 GMT

    Both England and India's coaches are Zimbabwean, but look at their gap of performances. Well, in my opinion, only successful cricketer could become the successful coach. If Duncan doesn't know how to bat or bowl, how would he teach others? Duncan's highest score was 91 in his entire FIRST CLASS career of 111 matches and grabbed 10 wickets haul just once, never got selected for Tests. He played only 7 ODIs and made 191 runs with the strike rate of 66.08 (Too low for ODIs). What this guy will teach Sehwag who carries 50+ average in Tests with the strike rate of over 80? Duncan only can teach/coach him to play slower like he used to play. And what he would teach Sachin, Gambhir, Dravid who carry 50+ test averages? India was so stupid enough to hire this guy who was struggling when he was a player. India should hire someone who was successful in his time, so Indian players could not have any arguments but listen to him and follow his rules.

  • POSTED BY OliverWebber on | September 8, 2011, 19:20 GMT

    A very interesting interview, as ever. What's strange about so many of the Indian fans is that their response to defeat and a bad tour seems automatically either to insult the opposition or to make excuses. What on earth is the point of that? When England have lost heavily (eg Australia 2006-7) fans and the media were unanimous in criticising the team and talking about what changes needed to be made. We didn't go about saying "Wait till you're in England, we'll see who's boss then", or "That was unfair, your pitches/weather etc favoured your bowlers", or "We didn't have enough warm-up matches, it was a conspiracy by Cricket Australia". We said "Jeez guys, what a terrible performance by England, let's figure out what went wrong and try to make sure it never happens again." Result? A gradual transformation to the successful team we now have. I sincerely hope England meet a strong India in the return series - and a change of attitude would be the first step.

  • POSTED BY Alexk400 on | September 8, 2011, 18:08 GMT

    Nothing wrong with nasser , it is just that indian fans/public has thin skin. Nasser was telling the honest truth that indian fielding is no good. if Nasser said in simple english , no one would have noticed. indian fielding is worse than donkey and donkey should get offended in first place. THE FACT IS SELECTED INDIAN CRICKETERS ARE NOT ATHLETIC. it is always the case in past 60 years. Not sure why. if i guess one thing , it is lack of abundent energy , when people have less energy they save it for core skills. Fielding is thankless job in indian cricket. Hahaha. For duncan fletcher to succeed , he has to find a real fast bowler.Oldies sooner or later will retire but he need a bowler who can remove tails. Until then his coach spot is iffy.

  • POSTED BY NairUSA on | September 8, 2011, 17:59 GMT

    @Yevghenny - I do not disagree with you. Team India's performance has enabled every retired english cricketers to come out of the woodwork to appease the english cricketing public in the hope of regaining their lost lustre. Yes, it is a reflection of the times.

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 16:53 GMT

    @ amit that was a very interesting point you raised there about rising above system and thats why we rely on individuals.

  • POSTED BY NairUSA on | September 8, 2011, 16:50 GMT

    @Pete Munday - Nasser appears to be a great bloke for the english public and his observations are probably good for them. However, there is no denying the fact that he is seeking easy publicity. Period. As I said, the Indian team, with their dismal performance is a good target for these faded cricketers. Team India has given enough ammunition to the likes of Nasser who was hoping for a something to tag on to for reviving their popularity. As for your comment, I will hold on to the 'mythical' chip that you are referring to. LOL. You are indeed funny.

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 14:01 GMT

    Politics->BCCI->MSD->Players->Fletcher- He can't do de job. buckle up :-)

  • POSTED BY samonly007200 on | September 8, 2011, 12:24 GMT

    Who cares about what Naseer Husain has to say about India. The man is short tempered and shoul not be commentating. Learn to talk first. After donkey saga... The chanels will think twice before hiring him...

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 10:25 GMT

    NairUSA - I Think its time you took that massive chip off your shoulder. What you term slander is simply factual analysis , do you expect the media to pull their punches just because it might upset those Indian fans who refuse to accept the evidence of their own eyes.

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 10:10 GMT

    get rid of Sachin, Laxman, gambhir (he let his country down when he played injured in the IPL), Zaheer, Munaf, Vinay, Vijay, Bhajjie Mishra

    let Dravid and Sehwag and dhoni be the nucleus of the new team.

    1. Rohit sharma must play every test 2. dont discard raina yet. Send him back to the nets for a year. Do the same with sreesanth

    3. No IPL for the India squad.want to play then leave Indian team

    team: - Sehwag, Mukund, Dravid, Kohli,Rohit Sharma, Rayadu, parthiv(as batter), Dhoni, Rohit Sharma(spinner), ozha, Aron, ishant, R. P. Singh praveen Kumar, Irfan pathan

  • POSTED BY Yevghenny on | September 8, 2011, 9:35 GMT

    NairUSA, the Indian team are getting a kicking right now because they just embarrassed themselves in England. Crushed in every match

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 8:26 GMT

    People want to see things they can't do themselves. People go to a Test match to see bowlers bowl at 95 miles an hour, because they know they know they can never bowl a 95-miler. They can't face anyone at 95 miles an hour. If they are just going to go and see medium-pacers they see in club cricket, they know that was good, but what's the fuss all about? - Absolute GEM By Nasser. Wonderful Interview and if you just look at it as a CRICKET FAN, makes a lot of sense.

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 6:22 GMT

    @maddy20: Sure you must have seen this sometime? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1PRxHTdtgE Fearsome indeed! You might have looked up on Cricinfo that his ODI HS is 188*...but it doesn't show that it was against the UAE. I respect Gary and do not want to pick out anything about him. He is a fantastic character and a good man manager. But pointing out statistics to show that he and Dhoni are the best in the world in their fields? I am not that type. Both of them are a good coach/captain but not the best IMO. They just had a good time - they are not the panacea for any suffering country. As for Greg, the players he 'humiliated' were Ganguly, Sehwag, Zaheer, Bhajji and Yuvraj. Apart from Ganguly, I have no doubt how many of these are fit anytime - let alone not injured. I'm not saying Greg is a good guy - just saying that he is not as bad as Indians portray him to be.

  • POSTED BY maddy20 on | September 8, 2011, 4:58 GMT

    Contd.. Dragged them down to a level where they lost to Bangladesh in a WC match and were packed back home in the first round. As a coach, one cannot do much worse! The technique and talent of a coach do not matter if there are no results to testify. I don't seem to remember any team coached by guru Greg, succeeding! Australia are slowing finding some rhythm now that he is gone. Good riddance one must say!

  • POSTED BY maddy20 on | September 8, 2011, 4:55 GMT

    @Sriraj GS Did you check Gary's record? I bet you didn't. Let me help you. Gary Kirsten and Andrew Hudson were one of the most fearsome opening combinations of their era. He was more than just a coach. If he was technically incorrect, then how come he brought the likes of Yuvraj, Sehwag back to form? I seem to also remember that the Indian team under Kirsten did not have a batting coach. So logically he corrected the errors in technique of these failing batsmen. On the contrary I will tell you what kind of a player Greg is. Together with his brother he brought great disgrace to the game of cricket by under-arming in an international match to keep the batsman from scoring a 6 of the last ball. As a coach, he nearly ended Viru's career, ended that of fantastic allrounder(Irfan Pathan) who Wasim Akram complimented that he bowled like him, created rift between the players and one of the most succesful captains of India(S Ganguly) and dragged them down to a level where they lost ....contd

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 4:51 GMT

    Great show. It is good

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 4:10 GMT

    one of the best interviews ever!very articulate and incisive..Nasser is his won man and had his own ideas whilst captaining and now whilst Commentating!throughly enjoyable read..remember GA GOOCH having a profound effect on his game ,whilst in hibernation in 94 and 95.and how he helped a raw/too fiesty a Nasser hone and channelise all the Built in rage into tons of runs!

  • POSTED BY dsig3 on | September 8, 2011, 3:31 GMT

    Fletcher wont last. Kirsten survived because he would pander to India. Fletcher has a history of conflict. Indias older players wont be able to stomach him. India has never been able to handle a foreign coach who will call them out.

  • POSTED BY on | September 8, 2011, 3:00 GMT

    England stint as No 1 Test team is going to be shorter than India's.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 23:31 GMT

    who is fletcher he made indian cricket team poor as bangladesh team was around 1996/97 remove him and bring gary back please find some good fast and spinner bowler from big population of india

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 22:25 GMT

    he is right when he says bowlers put bums in seats even if u like to watch batsmen like Sachin Dravid Sehwag & co it is a greater thrill when u know that these batsmen will be tested by high class bowlers! would the spectators rather see Praveen Kumar Munaf Patel or Darren Sammy bowling at mid to high 6o's or 70's mph or Steyn Johnson Fidel & Roach tearing in to take on Cook Petersen & co? its a no brainer!!

    despite the spot fixing scandal the pakistan england series was very exciting because on both sides the bowling was top class!

    let's hope Steyn & Morkel & Kallis are fit & raring to go for the series next year as well. without them it wil be just as lack lustre as the just concluded series vs India

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 21:50 GMT

    @maddy20 & Amit: I have nothing against Kirsten. He was a hardworking nice chap who got along well with the players. But that's about it. He did the management job well but I don't think he's as technically proficient as Greg or Dunc. My opinion is simply that the BCCI shouldn't have hired these two because they are coaches who solely work on the technical aspects. The way the Indian players work, they are not going to listen to people giving technical advice so a coach who can just manage them is enough. Ideally, a Flower or a Kirsten should be chosen as executive director of operations and a Greg or Dunc working under them as a technical coach - both aspects of the role met.

  • POSTED BY Valavan on | September 7, 2011, 20:44 GMT

    @GuptaAnkur, your statements have no reasoning here. India has an unchanged team right from 2002 until now. Look Ganguly,Kumble retired, few axed, kohli, rohit sharma included in their best 11, thats the truth, dont think the same team will perform everytime. the same 11 had problems till 2007 WC, from then on they had a good 3 year period between 2008 March till 2011 April. now its downhill. Look at this indian ODI team, MSD,Gambhir aged 30, sehwag and zaheer 33, harbajan 31,tendulkar 38, dravid 38, nehra also 31, so atleast sehwag,zaheer,tendulkar are in their age to rework their fitness else anytime they can be injured and due to injury they can be shelled. Accept England has a GOOD TEAM but INDIA has GOOD INDIVIDUALS. CRICKET isnt TENNIS, its a team game.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 20:00 GMT

    i would just like to ask nasser why is he worried to much about india these days just coz they played bad in last 10weeks?? we all know that england just played couple of good series at home and it will b changed soon again when they will play abroad why is he not worried that that cricket started from england wht did the never domante in cricket for long time never won world cup and just 3weeks ago first time ever on nummer one ranking that should b shame that it took that long time for them

  • POSTED BY NairUSA on | September 7, 2011, 19:44 GMT

    Well, it is a good thing that Nasser did not use the word 'mule'. It would have been really interesting. Every tom, dick and harry has a few things to say about the Indian team now as they have positioned themselves in a hole. It has become fashionable for the british analysts to slander the Indian team as it suddenly gets appreciative nods from the english public. There is definitely no cure for this behaviour and will end only when England goes through a major failure streak.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 19:28 GMT

    @FitzroyMarsupial - point taken mate with respect to "individual performances" taking us to the top as well as the fact that there has been very little team ethic. But let me ask you in which sphere in India do you see a proper work ethic? Most of us have the "its okay" attitude! So no wonder whoever does well, whether in sports or in other spheres, does well despite the system not because of the system. Our template for success will remain that: rise above the system, and hence will depend on the individuals to do that.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 18:47 GMT

    What an excellent interview, and I say that is someone who wasn't Nasser's biggest fan as a player. Name another sport where you get such insightful and intelligent comment from its ex-players

  • POSTED BY OhhhhMattyMatty on | September 7, 2011, 18:39 GMT

    Nasser is a great bloke. Post Flower, he is the guy who should be England coach!

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 18:29 GMT

    Great show nasser!Like you I am also born at St Isabel's hospital in Madras. My uncle ; who played for the mcc{madras cricket club} has talked to me about your dad , javed hussain.for us Madrasis it is a previlage to tell the rest of the world that the first english captain with asian roots is a madrasi.you have been very humble in saying that you were not a reason for the success of this english team. in australian terms you are allan border,michealvaughan is mark taylor and andrew strauss is steve waugh.you sowed the seed and england are reaping the harvest .and yes , you were right when you called some of the indian fielders donkeys.but you must also add a word called lazy before the donkeys.all the best buddy do well

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 17:40 GMT

    for the first time as an indian fan i salute u nasser!!

  • POSTED BY Sagay-Ed on | September 7, 2011, 16:40 GMT

    From all comments he is making on air, I understand that he does not know about most of the Indian Players. Raina is a destructive batsman from day 1, but he is repeating again and again that he has benefited from IPL. He also thinks that his comments are golden words and keeps repeating them. A good commentator gives match commentary when the match is going on, but he is analyzing and making comments on the cricket board, selection... Dont know what he thinks about himself... He is also ANTI-IPL.. If any batsmen is out, any bowler gets injured, any sloppy fielding... he gives IPL as reason for that... this shows lack of information... There are other commentator who give wonderful information about matches played before decades...

  • POSTED BY montys_muse on | September 7, 2011, 16:02 GMT

    well, what we need to say here is a change in work ethics rather than change in culture....

  • POSTED BY Dr.HWS on | September 7, 2011, 15:34 GMT

    I fully agree with Nasser Hussain.

    In India players are bigger than coaches. Indian cricket was just lucky to have some extraordinarily gifted players over the years.

    Other wise we have no culture of physical fittness,methodical training system to produce high quality cricketers.

    Our sports bodies are run by corrupt politicians.

    Greg Chappel could not work in India for obvious reasons.

    I wonder how Duncan Fletcher would function.

    But one thing is certain the people of India wont take to long the way Indian team has played in the last two months.

    The were busy with Anna Hazaare....

    Harsha Bardhan

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 15:16 GMT

    The Indians need to strike a balance between T20, ODI and tests and stick with it. The collective greed of the BCCI, the IPL teams, other boards looking for a piece of the Indian TV money pie, and the players themselves are ruining and shortening many careers and diluting the quality of cricket. The BCCI should put a strict limit on how much of T20/ODI/test cricket any of its contracted players participate in, serious or not. Part of this is making sure the players are fit both physically and mentally by serious trainers who are not beholden to BCCI officials. Before all this, the BCCI needs to buy into the need for balance and restraint for the sake of Indian cricket. Do they have it in them? Past experience says no.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 15:04 GMT

    Fletcher seems like the kind of coach that can really help in the long run. The Indian fans, media and thus the BCCI have no patience at least not the sort that Fletcher needs. Something needs to give for this arrangement to work.

  • POSTED BY Truemans_Ghost on | September 7, 2011, 14:52 GMT

    More wisdom from Nass. I personally believe that Fletcher will not last long as Indian coach. I can't see his uncompromising stubborn abrasiveness working well there. It isn't that the guys doesn't have virtues as a coach, just he looks a bad fit for India. If he tries to bully some of the less fit players into excercise he is going to get resentment, not results and will find that they have his bosses ear more than he does. Kirsten, I think, understood this. Chappel didn't.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 14:44 GMT

    Forget about taking action

    This shud be the last of his series with India he may be the greatest of coaches but it doesnt seem so that both the team and Fletcher is having a good time with each other

    garry kirsten said before leaving India that my Major work was to motivate the guys and i really dont know and cant understand how can a 63 year old man can motivate a team with so much variants India is kind of country with 4-5 types of people who even dont know each others language completely diff in nature

    with all due respect to him i have to say that this should be last of his series as a Indian coach .

  • POSTED BY zico123 on | September 7, 2011, 14:35 GMT

    too much T20 and huge money from IPL and CL is killing Indian cricket !! it is causing fatigue in Indian international players and it is telling youngstars they can make a good career by just becoming good T20 player, no need to work hard to become a great Test player. if these continues India would never produce another Sachin or Dravid, you would only get limited over specialists like Raina or Pathan. Reduce the salaray in IPL and CL and cut it to 2 week event, if you can't get rid of it altogether.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 14:16 GMT

    There is a thin line between being outspoken and being arrogance.. I guess Nasser is crossing that line in every other interview and discussion.. and some how this guys is calming to be the architect of English success. Well i am no big follower of English cricket bt I feel the credit should go to Strauss and Andy..

  • POSTED BY Alexk400 on | September 7, 2011, 13:57 GMT

    Duncan fletcher wants to make his own team like greg chappell tried. Greg tried to get rid of oldies. But indian super star players have extreme support in BCCI regional circles. So best way to get rid of them is like absolute failure in England. May be it was planned by Duncan fletcher. The issue is not 4-0 loss. Issue is will BCCI let him create his own young team? Does he has the power to select his own players. Will BCCI quota system allow that?. Greg chappel had unflinching support from ravi sastri who has big voice in BCCI. Not sure duncan has any support that level. N srinivasan may like duncan style of authoritative as long duncan keep superstar players in their comfy zone. if duncan fletcher to succeed sachin ,darvd and VVS laxman must retire , this will allow him to make his own team from ground up.

  • POSTED BY Alexk400 on | September 7, 2011, 13:51 GMT

    He was a flop for india and will be a flop. Duncan fletcher is a proven coach , it is just that he is in a mould of handson greg chappell. Duncan fletcher wants a change , but knowing BCCI they won't change how they select people. It is always a quota system , so finding a gem is pure luck. Especially bowling department india suffer because of quota policy instead of real talent.

  • POSTED BY maddy20 on | September 7, 2011, 13:49 GMT

    @Sriraj G.S I cannot believe that you support Greg Chappell. He was nothing sort of a disaster. No just in India but in his own country too, he could not hold just the selectors job for 6 months. When Fletcher was the coach of England, nothing great ever happened to them. A coach is one who should be pro-active and change according to the situation. Not one who sticks to some kind of a "template". We are not machines for god's sake. Here in India people are a lot more emotional and reactive. You have to think from your player's perspective, put yourself in their shoes and teach them. Gary Kirsten revealed that this is the secret to his success in getting our stalwarts back to form. If Mr.Fletcher cant follow that, he'd better collect his dues and leave!

  • POSTED BY moko58 on | September 7, 2011, 13:29 GMT

    Geoff Boycott has the same outspokenness as Nasser. They say it as it is.

  • POSTED BY Nutcutlet on | September 7, 2011, 13:17 GMT

    @Nyrac Bong. And your precedent is? To run for cover claiming force majeure is absurd! How many cricketers are there in India? Your notional first XI wasn't exactly blazing a trail of glory across the Test cricket grounds of England, was it? If I were you, I'd see the bigger picture (how many times do I seem to have to point this out to folk on this site?). With so many of your of (fading) stars missing from the line-up, this is a heaven-sent opportunity for the youngsters to stake a claim for serious consideration for selection, even when the established players are fit (or whatever qualifies as fit in Indian terms). I'm sure that you can reel off a dozen names of cricketers you'd like to see representing your country. Why not give them that chance without suggesting that they are only an A team? Now, if you were from New Zealand, with its tiny population, I might have some sympathy with your plea. As it is, your suggestion is whimpish! The proud Kiwis would never stoop so low anyway!

  • POSTED BY FitzroyMarsupial on | September 7, 2011, 13:14 GMT

    Amit - you're right. We aren't the same as the Poms and the Aussies. However the laws of cricket - e.g. catches have to be taken to dismiss the opposition batsmen etc, do, annoyingly, apply universally. The lack of respect here is by the Indian players and administration to their adoring fans. Whilst we are prepared to continue to lavish praise and indulge talented but overweight, lazy cricketers - that's exactly what they will be. Why would they be anything else? Yes, we have seen some brilliant and dedicated players in the past 10 years which led to success. That was individual application though, it has not instilled a team ethic - do you see that attitude from Yuvraj, Munaf, RP - even Zaheer turned up looking in worse shape than me. All of our 'fast' bowlers are slower aged 25 than at 19. Fletcher will tell us the truth. Whether we are prepared to hear it is the real question. I agree there is a template - no one seems to want to do the hard work required to follow it though.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 13:05 GMT

    I feel Indian team must change , and what Nasser says makes a lot of sense, first of all we need new faces, see this English side, its the youngest and fittest English side I have seen in years, there were a few of them with more talent, but hardly any english team this young and fit. Secondly they are enjoying their cricket after the journey they took from bottom to top, classic case is Broad, who if he was in Indian Team would be dropped for ever( for conceeding six sixes) but the mature english management and public have given the guy a chance to play. Cricket is a young man's game and so India must decide how they want their 2015 World Cup to be , start by dropping people like Sachin, Dravid and VVS in tests, bring in fresh talent, allow them to fail now, so that they can succeed later..

  • POSTED BY Gupta.Ankur on | September 7, 2011, 12:57 GMT

    Fletcher is no god sent, considering especially that his recent test performance as coach reads : 0-9!

    Also, hussain bhai wait when your team leaves for the sub-continent........i think half the team will be injured b4 the 1st Odi itself.......

  • POSTED BY Gupta.Ankur on | September 7, 2011, 12:34 GMT

    One good series doesn't give anyone the bragging rights.......to all english fans.......we will see if you win in subcontinent....

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 12:30 GMT

    Nrayc - India pull out of the series because of injured players and results not count against their team is hilarious. Every cricketing nation has to put out their best side that is fit. Just because India players play too much domestic cricket IPL etc and are either unfit or not rested is not an excuse to not play. India either cares about international cricket or it doesn't. The England players haven't played much county cricket all summer due to this series. Players are fit rested and healthy. You can't just play the world cup then bail out of international cricket and say we are #1. I personally hope that Fletcher is given control and the top india players are pulled from their domestic cricket, paid better to play for country than for domestic. It can only be better for world cricket if all teams are strong and fit.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 12:14 GMT

    Majority of Indian People don't know the value of Test cricket. Current Young generation is in illusion that IPL is Cricket. What Duncan does will not matter as this Team India is IPL servant and completely unfit and useless to play International Cricket or Test Cricket. IPL has taken betting to highest level. IPL is not a Cricketing event it is a worst commerical event. Team India and BCCI is completely focussed on IPL. Because of IPL, Team India is losing skill, inspiration, motivation and fitness to play Test Cricket. These curators, coaches and BCCI officials are working for IPL growth rather than Cricket growth. Until IPL is thrashed, Team India is not going to perform well in other tournaments. IPL is completely meaningless and obsolete Tournament. Test, ODI & T20 Cricket is great to watch between Countries unlike IPL Teams which look like clubs. Test Cricket is ultimate to watch on sportive pitches. But IPL is making these pitches Lifeless.

  • POSTED BY rko_rules on | September 7, 2011, 11:38 GMT

    I definitely agree with Nasser on the point-- when people say 'O come on, it is just a game.' And my reaction is also the same- It is much more than a game. Look at the excitement and jubilation it brings to the whole country when your country wins world cup. Sports is always a very big way to earn pride for your country. And

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 11:31 GMT

    The Indian cricket fans wish to learn from BCCI as to what is prohibiting them from sending a notice to ICC and the ECB stating that the Indian Senior Team (the ICC ODI Wolrd Champions) remains formally "withdrawn" from the English Tour due to force majeure reasons arising out of almost the entire actual senior squad being OUT of action due to injuries. To maintain TV committments and public interest BCCI has sent the Indian "A" TEAM (the 2nd Team) to take its place and continue the matches scheduled, HOWEVER this should not be counted as official ODI series against the world champion team. MS Dhoni should also rule himself out and let Pathiv do the keeping and Raina lead the team. THIS IS 100% truth and we should and must do it immediately. I call upon cricinfo for a debate on this & a response from BCCI. - N. Ray-Dubai

  • POSTED BY lollypop on | September 7, 2011, 10:29 GMT

    I agree with Nasir. The Indian BCCI just making money insted of uplifting game. They told people that they are getting young cricketer from IPL. Each and every indian know that There is no such aim. They are just making money by involving the Retired and current players. Where is place for New Players. Playing as 12th man. Doing Waiters job. The BCCI know that Even a donkey is playing in IPL people (the betting mafia) will watch it. If it player like sachin and sehwag. It fetch them double. They really not interested in uplifting the game.

  • POSTED BY AvidFanDownUnder on | September 7, 2011, 10:21 GMT

    Great interview of Nasser Hussain - I never liked him as a player (which is probably a good thing since I was Aussie) but could never fault him once the game was over - still remember the 2003 Ashes in Sydney he purposely held up Steve Waugh before the last ball to annoy him and try and elicit a mistake but was quite vocal in his support once the day ended. What does this show - he was an absolute competitor on the field but a great bloke off it. I just wonder if Duncan Fletcher will be able to use his insight to the benefit of the Indians (and remember Andy Flower might have coached England to win in Australia last year but it was Fletcher's Englishmen in 2005 that showed us Aussies weren't invincible). Thanks Cricinfo for this interview with Nasser.

  • POSTED BY SDHM on | September 7, 2011, 10:20 GMT

    @ Gupta - that's exactly the attitude Hussain's talking about.

  • POSTED BY Dashgar on | September 7, 2011, 10:05 GMT

    Seems the only way India can better is to take the advice of Greg Chappell that they have been ridiculing for the past 4 years. Ironic

  • POSTED BY Fifthman on | September 7, 2011, 10:03 GMT

    Just the comments on this board show what a difficult job Fletcher will have. It seems like a lot of Indian posters are still in denial about the changes that need to be made in Indian cricket. Yes, Gupta.Ankur, Andy.rockz, I'm talking about you. The Indian players have too much power and misuse that power. They may be Gods in their own country, but that doesn't mean they can't train and be fit.

  • POSTED BY Vnket on | September 7, 2011, 8:58 GMT

    That was a very frank and forthright Interview. I like listening to you Nasser. You do have something to say. an opinion. which i admire even though i might not agree with it at all times.

  • POSTED BY Vnket on | September 7, 2011, 8:56 GMT

    That was a very frank and forthright Interview. I like listening to you Nasser. You do have something to say. an opinion. which i admire even though i might not agree with it at all times.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 8:54 GMT

    @SouthPaw: I agree with you. Greg Chappel had the right ideas and could have done a great job. Similar in mould to Dunc. But the Indians just don't have that work culture with the presence of super-star figures in and around. They succeed thanks to talent but are simply too lazy and don't like getting advice from experts which hurts their ego. Right now Zaheer, Bhajji, Gambhir, Yuvraj are the losers sitting in the sidelines with injuries while Greg is possibly smugly smiling with an "I told you so" expression!

  • POSTED BY Herbet on | September 7, 2011, 8:32 GMT

    As for the IPL and "looking after the future of the game" or whatever, why don't they make it into a 50 over league? Think about it, the games would be longer, therefore there would be more adverts and more money from advertising revenue - as a result the franchise owners and the BCCI can continue to fill their pockets to an even greater extent. This would allow the Indian players, legends and ordinary ones, to get paid more too, thus benefiting them. Also, 50 over cricket still requires a lot of the skills needed for Test cricket, in batting particularly, so it would be doing less damage to young players who would still have to be able to play properly and not just slog. And in 50 over cricket it is still generally the technically sound good test players who are the best, so young Indians would grow up idolising the right players to copy, rather than a load of hit and hope sloggers like Pollard. Then after, or before it, they could hold a short T20 comp as a knockout cup.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 8:29 GMT

    @SouthPaw: Yeah mate, Chappell had outstanding results with Australia too and because of that he was kicked out of his job recently. Sorry for the sarcasm mate, but as Kirsten showed by adopting a different method, we could reach the top of the world in Test cricket and also win the world cup in one-day cricket. Right now, we are a team in transition and that happens in every aspect of life. India has seen the template for success, and there is no reason why a new bunch of players cant build on it if they are as dedicated as some of the greats we have seen in the recent past.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 8:22 GMT

    Nass seems to be suggesting that the method adopted by Fletcher in England - being stubborn, rubbing people the wrong way etc - is the only way he would succeed in India. In other words, he is suggesting that unless the culture of Indian cricket is changed, they would not progress. Sorry Nass, I have to disagree. As you rightly pointed out about Chappell, he tried to change our culture. But the results were disastrous. We are not Poms. We are not Aussies. We are Indians. What works for you guys does not necessarily works for us. Whats right for you is not necessarily right for us. Your comments are not endearing you in any manner because they are indicative of an intolerance towards other cultures. And on a different note: you are a great supporter of DRS arent you? But Hot Spot had a disastrous summer! Doesn't do much to support your cause!! Bottomline - respect others mate. Calling players donkeys and throwing other similar jibes as a respected commentator lowers your esteem. Cheers

  • POSTED BY Herbet on | September 7, 2011, 8:20 GMT

    RE the problem of England players and the IPL and how to handle it, I would say we need to hike up central contracts a bit, though not that much, so that financially they don't have to look at the IPL and say that anybody who plays in the IPL (who is English) is ineligable to play for England that summer. i.e if Matt Prior decided he wanted to turn out for Kolkata Kit Kats or whoever this May, he would have been unable to play for England this summer. Seems fair enough to me. You put your country first, or you don't play. Simple. And if the Big Bash goes the same way say anybody who plays in that is ineligable for England on the winter tours.

  • POSTED BY Herbet on | September 7, 2011, 8:13 GMT

    I agree that far too much domestic T20 is played, and too many International ODI games. I think in England the T20 balance is only slightly skewed, it could be trimmed back a little, but I think we have it right that it is mixed in with the normal season and we don't have stand alone circus' like the Big Bash and IPL. As for ODI's, they should be limited to series of 3 or 4 games, just before or after a Test series. ODI only tours like England in India in October and the Aussies coming over here next year are just pointless and eat into time when players could be resting. Interesting that Hussain says all this stuff when he works for Sky, who if they had there own way would have England playing Australia and a T20 game on everyday. Shows that he is still independent.

  • POSTED BY KarachiKid on | September 7, 2011, 8:07 GMT

    Again great comments. I am a big Nasser Husain "the analyst" fan.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 7:29 GMT

    @ Gupta.Ankur ... high performing ? we have great talented individuals but most unprofessional team. I am not against individual skill but this is not a solo game like lawn tennis but a team compromised of 11 players. 11 avg players with good team work are more likely to beat 11 stars with god complex and poor team work.

  • POSTED BY Kunal-Talgeri on | September 7, 2011, 6:49 GMT

    LOL "... every decision we made had to be voted on by the ECB cricket committee, which consisted of the counties. It was like turkeys voting for Christmas; it was a difficult thing to get by." :-D Thanks Nasser--that was very funny. BTW, I think a lot of your fans in India love u for your spirit, josh and front-foot cover drives -- not because you happen to be a Brit-Asian. Indians tend to be hospitable most times, especially to visitors. Pitch curators here are an exception.

  • POSTED BY Krishna_M on | September 7, 2011, 5:44 GMT

    The interview seems to have been done before Donkeygate, but the controversy has been over blown into ridiculous proportions in India. It was a relatively inane comment by Nasser and a common expression for slow coaches in the field in Eng. Similar to the term "scooters" that Gavaskar referred to. The comments in the social media and by some of the BCCI thugs like Rajiv Shukla show people don't have enough to do, focus on irrelevant topics when our ass (pun unintended!) is being whipped of the field and have a misplaced sense of ego that everyone critical has a vindictive agenda behind it. High time we accept constructive criticism and use it positively. Coming back to he interview, an excellent one. Good topical questions and excellent forthright answers.

  • POSTED BY Andy.rockz on | September 7, 2011, 5:16 GMT

    Nasser hussain hahaha..he is coming forward to give advices and the shortcourse seminars on presenting how to becoming No.1 claiming to be the origin of behind the success======my question is Why can't he came forward while they are in crisis Well Done nasser your strategy is much better than vodafone Essar ? isn't it

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 5:06 GMT

    The solutions are great but does the BCCI care at all

  • POSTED BY SouthPaw on | September 7, 2011, 5:04 GMT

    I agree with Nass. Greg Chappel was trying to build an infrastructure where there was a whole lot of bench strength. And he didn't mince words when he said that Ganguly was indolent, Zaheer Khan was plain lazy and people like Harbhajan and Yuvraj had poor work ethics. And he has been proved right! Look at where these guys are....

  • POSTED BY moko58 on | September 7, 2011, 4:42 GMT

    Fletcher has had too much respect for the Indian players to push them.

  • POSTED BY Gupta.Ankur on | September 7, 2011, 4:21 GMT

    Hussain says :" players will be bigger than fletcher in India".........sadly Nasser Eng team never had high performing players like we have.......

    Indian greats have earned their respect by performing for more than a decade.....

  • POSTED BY harshalb on | September 7, 2011, 3:48 GMT

    India will choose to slam Dunc and pull a wool of facile flat track victories over their English misadventure ASAP.

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • POSTED BY harshalb on | September 7, 2011, 3:48 GMT

    India will choose to slam Dunc and pull a wool of facile flat track victories over their English misadventure ASAP.

  • POSTED BY Gupta.Ankur on | September 7, 2011, 4:21 GMT

    Hussain says :" players will be bigger than fletcher in India".........sadly Nasser Eng team never had high performing players like we have.......

    Indian greats have earned their respect by performing for more than a decade.....

  • POSTED BY moko58 on | September 7, 2011, 4:42 GMT

    Fletcher has had too much respect for the Indian players to push them.

  • POSTED BY SouthPaw on | September 7, 2011, 5:04 GMT

    I agree with Nass. Greg Chappel was trying to build an infrastructure where there was a whole lot of bench strength. And he didn't mince words when he said that Ganguly was indolent, Zaheer Khan was plain lazy and people like Harbhajan and Yuvraj had poor work ethics. And he has been proved right! Look at where these guys are....

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 5:06 GMT

    The solutions are great but does the BCCI care at all

  • POSTED BY Andy.rockz on | September 7, 2011, 5:16 GMT

    Nasser hussain hahaha..he is coming forward to give advices and the shortcourse seminars on presenting how to becoming No.1 claiming to be the origin of behind the success======my question is Why can't he came forward while they are in crisis Well Done nasser your strategy is much better than vodafone Essar ? isn't it

  • POSTED BY Krishna_M on | September 7, 2011, 5:44 GMT

    The interview seems to have been done before Donkeygate, but the controversy has been over blown into ridiculous proportions in India. It was a relatively inane comment by Nasser and a common expression for slow coaches in the field in Eng. Similar to the term "scooters" that Gavaskar referred to. The comments in the social media and by some of the BCCI thugs like Rajiv Shukla show people don't have enough to do, focus on irrelevant topics when our ass (pun unintended!) is being whipped of the field and have a misplaced sense of ego that everyone critical has a vindictive agenda behind it. High time we accept constructive criticism and use it positively. Coming back to he interview, an excellent one. Good topical questions and excellent forthright answers.

  • POSTED BY Kunal-Talgeri on | September 7, 2011, 6:49 GMT

    LOL "... every decision we made had to be voted on by the ECB cricket committee, which consisted of the counties. It was like turkeys voting for Christmas; it was a difficult thing to get by." :-D Thanks Nasser--that was very funny. BTW, I think a lot of your fans in India love u for your spirit, josh and front-foot cover drives -- not because you happen to be a Brit-Asian. Indians tend to be hospitable most times, especially to visitors. Pitch curators here are an exception.

  • POSTED BY on | September 7, 2011, 7:29 GMT

    @ Gupta.Ankur ... high performing ? we have great talented individuals but most unprofessional team. I am not against individual skill but this is not a solo game like lawn tennis but a team compromised of 11 players. 11 avg players with good team work are more likely to beat 11 stars with god complex and poor team work.

  • POSTED BY KarachiKid on | September 7, 2011, 8:07 GMT

    Again great comments. I am a big Nasser Husain "the analyst" fan.