Saad Shafqat
Saad Shafqat Saad ShafqatRSS FeedFeeds  | Archives
Writer based in Karachi

A letter to Salman Butt

You forgot to read the fine print, didn't you?

Saad Shafqat

June 25, 2012

Comments: 35 | Text size: A | A

Salman Butt heads to court on the day the verdicts were delivered, London, November 1, 2011
Salman Butt: anger, nervousness, fear, but no remorse © Associated Press
Enlarge

Dear Salman,

There's no point beating about the bush, so I'll come right out and say it. You are a disappointment and a disgrace. This is not just one person's opinion, but a feeling shared deeply by millions of Pakistan supporters, and indeed by cricket lovers around the globe who revere the game and want to keep it clean.

Yet when I address you as "dear", it is not a hypocritical pleasantry. You played some fine knocks for Pakistan, and when you captained your team to Test victory at The Oval, you were magnificent. For that, you are dear to us and always will be.

This makes your transgression, and the stubborn denial of guilt that has followed it, all the more heart-wrenching to bear. You must think we are stupid and find your story believable. We're not, and we don't. Don't you realise we can see through this charade? We are Pakistanis, Salman. We have suffered more than our share of corrupt figures. We know what corruption smells like. It smells like this.

Do you know what really gave it away? It wasn't that you were fingered in court by Mohammad Amir and Mazhar Majeed, nor the gobs of money found in your hotel room, nor your theatrical sprinkling of sawdust over the bowling crease after Amir's even more theatrical no-ball at Lord's. What gave it away was your smirk.

It was during the sentencing phase of the trial that your cool exterior finally crumbled. Before that, you cut a confident, sometimes even aloof, figure, with that cocky smirk constantly visible. Your face didn't say, "I'm innocent." It said, "I've hit a snag, but I'm in control, with all eventualities planned for."

After the verdict, all of that vanished. Your brow creased up, your eyes became downcast, the colour drained from your face. The smirk disappeared. You looked nervous and afraid, but above all you looked angry. The one emotion we did not see on your face was remorse.

It all went so horribly wrong, didn't it? When you first hatched the plan, you could never have imagined it would come to this. The payoff was delicious, and nobody would be the wiser. The only deterrent was the ICC and its code of conduct. There was no fear of coming afoul of the law, and the possibility of going to jail did not even remotely cross your mind.

But you forgot to read the fine print. It would have alerted you to a law known as the UK Gambling Act of 2005. Your moral conscience was certainly not getting in the way; perhaps this statute might have. Eventually you were trapped in a classic prisoner's dilemma. The evidence against you was already hefty; once your accomplices squealed, it was all over.

Now you are back in Pakistan, after serving a fraction of your sentence, in exchange for agreeing to get deported. You are still proclaiming innocence, still stoking delusions of clearing your name. Coming from a clever man like you, this is surprising as well as sad. You are blindly following a strategy of stringent denial, but it seems that once again you have forgotten to read the fine print. In a storm, it is the rigid tree that snaps and breaks while the one that can flex and bend survives. An intelligent mind like yours should easily understand this. The only explanation for your inflexibility is that anger at getting caught is clouding your judgement.

If so, there is hope. In time, your fury will recede and the fog will lift. Family, friends, and other well-wishers, along with reason and logic, will be allowed back into your mental space. At that point, you will begin to see that the journey of redemption begins with an honest confrontation of the truth. We are patiently waiting for that day. When it comes, we will be right there with you to help the healing begin.

All good wishes,

Saad

Saad Shafqat is a writer based in Karachi

RSS Feeds: Saad Shafqat

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by soorajiyer on (June 28, 2012, 3:01 GMT)

Excellent mate! It takes courage to accept you are wrong and if he had done that I am sure each one of us would be having sympathy for him. After all who doesnt make mistakes in life, But learn to accept as Saad has said Salman. Please do it!

Posted by alimu24 on (June 27, 2012, 22:00 GMT)

Very well written and its written on behalf of 180 million Pakistanis....but there is a hope that our youngsters will learn from this and our team and nation will emerge stronger!!

Posted by S.Alis on (June 27, 2012, 15:58 GMT)

A letter, which should shake Salman Butt if he has a little bit pride left in his body. Well done Mr. Saad

Posted by DivineElegance on (June 27, 2012, 14:43 GMT)

Thank you...Saad Shafqat expressing your feelings.. I am sure every Pakistani and game of Cricket lover all over the Globe (where this game is being played and watched) do feel the same way as you did in this OPEN letter to Salman!

Posted by Selassie-I on (June 27, 2012, 10:31 GMT)

well written, nail on the head..

Posted by mumbaiguy79 on (June 27, 2012, 5:56 GMT)

Very very well written..feel sad for Mohammed Amir though..he could have been one of the greats...

Posted by   on (June 26, 2012, 19:57 GMT)

I agree with each and every of your words, Saad ! Very well written !

Posted by   on (June 26, 2012, 16:39 GMT)

The nation know the fact of Salman butt, amir and Asif surprisingly PCB try to include these players in future team why? it is quite simple u can do any thing for money even earning million of rupees .........u do it and take a placr again in team............youngster should learn this example

Posted by applethief on (June 26, 2012, 16:23 GMT)

Well said Saad, your words speak the sentiments of many

Posted by   on (June 26, 2012, 12:52 GMT)

Brilliant piece of writing, Saad.

Comments have now been closed for this article

FeedbackTop
Email Feedback Print
Share
E-mail
Feedback
Print
Saad ShafqatClose

    'I'm 31 but I feel 51 and look like 61'

Netherlands captain Peter Borren on his fictitious nicknames, beating England twice, and how he scares his neighbours

'Hard work, not natural talent, has made me'

Rohit Sharma on his frustrating road back from injury, and the need for young cricketers to be disciplined

    Top dog of the underdogs

My Favourite Cricketer: Jack Russell brought a neatness to the keeper's art that was matched by his meticulous scruffiness in other regards. By Scott Oliver

    Rewarding times for Hashim Amla

Numbers Game: The rate at which he has accumulated ODI hundreds and MoM awards is among the fastest in history

ODI overs analysis using ball-by-ball data: part 3

Anantha Narayanan: Analyses of the scoring trends in ODIs, beginning with the 1999 World Cup

News | Features Last 7 days

Manic one-day chases, and daddy partnerships

Also, most brothers in a Test XI, and the fastest to 20 ODI centuries

Rewarding times for Hashim Amla

The rate at which Amla has accumulated ODI hundreds and MoM awards is among the fastest in history. And his runs-per-innings figure is easily the best of the lot

Well worth the wait

Zulfiqar Babar missed five seasons between his first two first-class matches, and was 34 when he finally made his Test debut, but he is quickly making up for all the lost time with his artful left-arm spin

Has international cricket begun to break up?

The gap between the haves and the have-nots is growing wider, and the disenchantment is forcing a devaluation of Test cricket among weaker teams

Australia outdone in every way

Surviving into the final session of the last day cannot disguise the fact that Australia's continued inability to play spin contributed to an all-round thrashing

News | Features Last 7 days

    Has international cricket begun to break up? (83)

    The gap between the haves and the have-nots is growing wider, and the disenchantment is forcing a devaluation of Test cricket among weaker teams

    Rewarding times for Hashim Amla (61)

    The rate at which Amla has accumulated ODI hundreds and MoM awards is among the fastest in history. And his runs-per-innings figure is easily the best of the lot

    Australia outdone in every way (51)

    Surviving into the final session of the last day cannot disguise the fact that Australia's continued inability to play spin contributed to an all-round thrashing

    Lyon low after high of 2013 (51)

    The offspinner was Australia's highest wicket-taker in 2013, but his form has dipped sharply this year

    Well worth the wait (36)

    Zulfiqar Babar missed five seasons between his first two first-class matches, and was 34 when he finally made his Test debut, but he is quickly making up for all the lost time with his artful left-arm spin