Andrew Strauss retires August 29, 2012

One of England's best

There were no tears and no regrets. Just like during his career Andrew Strauss dealt in facts and reality when deciding to call it a day
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With memorable understatement and a conspicuous lack of fuss, Andrew Strauss resigned the England captaincy and retired from professional cricket. A lifetime of ambition and achievement, a good living well made - gone, finito. "You just know" he said, and you do. It washes over you. The sheer pleasure of release, an orgasm of self-appraisal and realisation. Then suddenly, the bearable lightness of being.

Typical Strauss. No glorification. No quivering lip, not even the blink of an eye. Just the facts. There was no emotion. "I know where I'm at" he said. Best to go when they ask why, not when. Apparently the energy levels to get his batting sorted are somewhere in the ether, somewhere lost in time. He is 35 years old. It is easy to forget that he started quite late.

Remember the Lord's hundred on debut and the second-innings 83 before Nasser Hussain ran him out? Only 2004. Remember the white gauze and plaster on his ear lobe while celebrating another hundred against Australia at Old Trafford in 2005? Remember the thrilling, horizontal left-handed catch at Trent Bridge the same summer? The counter-attack in Brisbane? The Ashes secured in Melbourne? The lifting of the urn in Sydney? The World Cup hundred for a tie in Bangalore? All Strauss. All memories now.

Alastair Cook sat alongside him in the boardroom at the offices of the ECB. Unusual that, the handing of the baton so immediate and public. Let Strauss have his moment you thought before realising he was not looking for "a moment". He was here because it was the next thing on the road. Like Cook if you think about, the next thing on a road much travelled by cricket's caravan.

These South Africans are consistent. Hussain, Michael Vaughan and now "Straussy", as "Cookie" kept calling him. All three, victims of the South Africans and a four-year cycle that ends with The Death of a Captain. Graeme Smith has seen them all off. No wonder they call him Biff.

So why did this intelligent and loyal man chose to move on? Not, he insists, because of Kevin. There may be plenty about Kev that occupies the Strauss mind but not enough to obscure his judgement. Quite likely, the Pietersen issue made him consider staying in the job a little longer - after all, it is unfinished business and there is nothing else about Strauss that is unfinished. He is a man of symmetry: begin and end at Lord's; play a hundred Tests, captain 50 of them. Twenty-one hundreds, just like Pietersen; 27 fifties, just like Pietersen.

Even the recession of his hair is divided equally from the forehead's remaining centre of growth. Oh no, KP was good reason to crack on - another challenge, as sports folk like to say. But he didn't fall for it. ("You just know.") So Kevin is Alastair's problem now. Big problem. "Look, there is a process to go through" said Alastair, when asked if he wanted Pietersen in his team. By which he meant, we need a punch up and from it there is the chance of a kiss and make-up. He better hope it comes off. The cupboard inherited is not so flush with batsmen. Stop for a minute and think about replacements for Strauss at the top of the order. There you go, it's not obvious.

Strauss retired because he had enough. Lucky him, no regrets. His batting has slipped from a former height; his captaincy has lost something of the midas touch; his team have lost six in 11 Tests; three key bowlers have lost a bit of zip; catches are being dropped; the kids at home are growing up fast; and so on.

Vaughan had a bad knee injury to decipher. Hussain had a lot of defeats to ponder. Strauss, an exceptional cricketer marginally on the wrong side of the hill, just wanted out. Unconditional, uncomplicated out. He had been thinking about it all summer. He didn't like speculation about his form and therefore his place in the team - remember the witch-hunt last spring, yes, only last spring.

"I went down where the vultures feed / I would've got deeper but there wasn't any need / I heard the tongues of angels and the tongues of men / And it wasn't any difference to me"

Bob Dylan from his song "Dignity". That's Strauss for you, his own man: a man of dignity. Honest, loyal and as good a captain of England as he could have been, one of the best. His team that became No. 1 in the world was also one of England's best. He made more than 7000 runs and held more catches in an England shirt than any man. When asked how he would like to be remembered, he said he hated the question, but added, "Remember me for who I am."

He also said that he had gone at a good time, that he was proud of the performance at Lord's when the team fought as one and, in the face of a major disruption, made South Africa go the distance. Typical of Strauss to see the upside. "What next?" said the long established cricket correspondent of the Sun newspaper. "Hmmm. I think I'll have crack at being cricket correspondent of the Sun." And that was pretty much that, upon which the press applauded him - a most surprising occurrence on a most surprising day. Good night captain, and good luck.

Mark Nicholas, the former Hampshire captain, presents the cricket on Channel 9 in Australia and Channel 5 in the UK

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY mikey76 on | September 1, 2012, 18:00 GMT

    No Randy England never had any legends....none at all. In the History of cricket...150 years plus we have never produced a single player of note. Do you sense the sarcasm??? But then Nathan Lyon and David Warner are both "legends" so there you go.

  • POSTED BY on | September 1, 2012, 17:21 GMT

    Sad to see an excellent gutsy leader for England leave as quietly as he did. He deserves all the credit for England's successes leading from the front on a number of occasions and focused on the task rather than the characters around it. All the best to Strauss for his future...good luck to England in trying to find a suitable replacement!!

  • POSTED BY Capt.Harry on | September 1, 2012, 14:26 GMT

    Great article Mark..very sad to see you go Strauss. You were a fine player/ captain. Players like you are hard to come by nowadays and the game itself is changing too rapidly.No longer are players appreciating the honor of representing their country.The truth is KP has messed up full time.End of story! Team work/spirit is dying. It is all about the self economics no matter how hard they try to disguise it.I still feel you could have gone on for one year longer though. Why? I have noticed ( as a first class cricketer myself)that good batsmen go through a purple patch between the ages of 32-36 years.Check out the records for this..Some names are Chanderpaul, Ponting,Kallis, Younis Khan..etc.I have your autograph from Guaracara Park Trinidad, the last time England toured the West Indies(2008/9). Good luck in your retirement.You deserve a long holiday. Come and visit the beautiful Caribbean..big fan.. but West Indian supporter.

  • POSTED BY Plz_Dont_Get_Whitewashed on | August 31, 2012, 18:52 GMT

    I will always remember Strauss for that 150+ score he made against India in the World Cup 2011 ! .... I was sweating bullets and chomping my nails in sheer tension till Andrew was on the crease whacking our bowlers all over the park!!! ;) Will always remember that Andy. (From an appreciative Indian Fan)

  • POSTED BY on | August 31, 2012, 12:23 GMT

    He's been a great captain for ENG

  • POSTED BY on | August 31, 2012, 9:22 GMT

    Graeme smith is a jinx lol....he might around 36 in 2017, and if he captains SA for that english tour we can be assured that he will be aiming for 4-0 hahahaha..

  • POSTED BY javed.agrawala on | August 31, 2012, 6:19 GMT

    Great article Mark Nicholas for a great cricketer. a model cricketer was Strauss in many ways!

    Good luck, Andrew, your calmness and leadership qualities will be missed. BTW I loved your comments on why no one would read your tweets! Typical understatement that came from you!

  • POSTED BY on | August 31, 2012, 2:52 GMT

    What a innings he played against India during last world cup... !!!!!!!!!!!!

  • POSTED BY tonobwoy on | August 31, 2012, 2:25 GMT

    Getting to the top is always easier than remaining at the top. Mr. Andrew Strauss has done a magnificent job of leading England to the pinnacle of Test cricket. I rate as the best English captain in the last fifty years. He played positive, attacking cricket which was very ''ub-english''. England will have to replace a giant ....and Ihave not seen anyone to do so in the immediate future.All the best to you, Andrew Strauss.

  • POSTED BY Meety on | August 31, 2012, 2:03 GMT

    @katandthat3 - I think it was Vaughn who pioneered the defensive tactic of boundary riders in Tests. However, he did that to counter a far superior foe, (Oz in 2005), which whilst negative was tactically astute.

  • POSTED BY mikey76 on | September 1, 2012, 18:00 GMT

    No Randy England never had any legends....none at all. In the History of cricket...150 years plus we have never produced a single player of note. Do you sense the sarcasm??? But then Nathan Lyon and David Warner are both "legends" so there you go.

  • POSTED BY on | September 1, 2012, 17:21 GMT

    Sad to see an excellent gutsy leader for England leave as quietly as he did. He deserves all the credit for England's successes leading from the front on a number of occasions and focused on the task rather than the characters around it. All the best to Strauss for his future...good luck to England in trying to find a suitable replacement!!

  • POSTED BY Capt.Harry on | September 1, 2012, 14:26 GMT

    Great article Mark..very sad to see you go Strauss. You were a fine player/ captain. Players like you are hard to come by nowadays and the game itself is changing too rapidly.No longer are players appreciating the honor of representing their country.The truth is KP has messed up full time.End of story! Team work/spirit is dying. It is all about the self economics no matter how hard they try to disguise it.I still feel you could have gone on for one year longer though. Why? I have noticed ( as a first class cricketer myself)that good batsmen go through a purple patch between the ages of 32-36 years.Check out the records for this..Some names are Chanderpaul, Ponting,Kallis, Younis Khan..etc.I have your autograph from Guaracara Park Trinidad, the last time England toured the West Indies(2008/9). Good luck in your retirement.You deserve a long holiday. Come and visit the beautiful Caribbean..big fan.. but West Indian supporter.

  • POSTED BY Plz_Dont_Get_Whitewashed on | August 31, 2012, 18:52 GMT

    I will always remember Strauss for that 150+ score he made against India in the World Cup 2011 ! .... I was sweating bullets and chomping my nails in sheer tension till Andrew was on the crease whacking our bowlers all over the park!!! ;) Will always remember that Andy. (From an appreciative Indian Fan)

  • POSTED BY on | August 31, 2012, 12:23 GMT

    He's been a great captain for ENG

  • POSTED BY on | August 31, 2012, 9:22 GMT

    Graeme smith is a jinx lol....he might around 36 in 2017, and if he captains SA for that english tour we can be assured that he will be aiming for 4-0 hahahaha..

  • POSTED BY javed.agrawala on | August 31, 2012, 6:19 GMT

    Great article Mark Nicholas for a great cricketer. a model cricketer was Strauss in many ways!

    Good luck, Andrew, your calmness and leadership qualities will be missed. BTW I loved your comments on why no one would read your tweets! Typical understatement that came from you!

  • POSTED BY on | August 31, 2012, 2:52 GMT

    What a innings he played against India during last world cup... !!!!!!!!!!!!

  • POSTED BY tonobwoy on | August 31, 2012, 2:25 GMT

    Getting to the top is always easier than remaining at the top. Mr. Andrew Strauss has done a magnificent job of leading England to the pinnacle of Test cricket. I rate as the best English captain in the last fifty years. He played positive, attacking cricket which was very ''ub-english''. England will have to replace a giant ....and Ihave not seen anyone to do so in the immediate future.All the best to you, Andrew Strauss.

  • POSTED BY Meety on | August 31, 2012, 2:03 GMT

    @katandthat3 - I think it was Vaughn who pioneered the defensive tactic of boundary riders in Tests. However, he did that to counter a far superior foe, (Oz in 2005), which whilst negative was tactically astute.

  • POSTED BY fleetwood-smith on | August 31, 2012, 0:46 GMT

    Well played Andrew Strauss on a fine career. No fuss, no histrionics, no excuses for a loss. No wonder you ended up a winner. Damn fine bat too. Well written Mark - good to see you are a closet Dylan fan!

  • POSTED BY On_me_head_son on | August 30, 2012, 21:57 GMT

    Firstly let me applaud you on a brilliant article Mr Nicholas.Andrew Strauss was not only a gritty performer with the bat but also a great leader who took England to where they are now.To beat the great Aussie side both at home and away is no mean feat and the way he handled pressure situations in such a cool,calm manner is testament to his character.Off the field the guy was a gentleman and there was no arrogance....Mr Strauss you can hold your head high as you say farewell to the game that you contributed so much to.Your family should be proud of your achievements.Best wishes and Good luck for the future from a Pakistani cricket fan.

  • POSTED BY zarasochozarasamjho on | August 30, 2012, 20:57 GMT

    Very well written article by Mark - thoughtful, balanced and so true. Good luck to Strauss, a most decent guy, & who says nice guys don't do well - just look at his achievements, both as player and as captain; not many have achieved what he has. Good luck from a Pakistani supporter!

  • POSTED BY sysubrceq0 on | August 30, 2012, 20:55 GMT

    @Selassie-I - I completely disagree with you, England team will play at home for 3 - 4 months a year ( 2- 3 series on avg )and the rest of the year they need to travel and play on the featherbeds where they can achieve 50-60 average. Likewise all Subcontinent teams will play 2- 3 test series at home and the rest of the series abroad in bouncy pitches. ICC FTP over 3 - 4 years coarse all teams will have to play atleast a series at home and abroad with same team. so the chances are almost same for all the countires. It depends on how u play in the series rather than where u play. Dravid played brilliantly in England last tour but the english team in Abu dhabi with Pakistan, pathetic display of playing spin.

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 18:12 GMT

    Strauss didn't retire because of the tour to India. India aren't exactly overflowing with class bowlers these days.

    I think I speak on behalf of all South Africans when I say we have an immense amount of respect for him. Despite carrying himself with great dignity and fortitude, his batting has let him down, and other people have let him down. He's definitely one of the better captains England have had, and in his prime he was a great batsman. He also had an incredibly level head and conducted himself off the pitch in enviable fashion. He achieved more than anyone could wish to achieve and should be dead proud of himself. He is a big loss for England.

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 17:52 GMT

    Andrew Strauss"s retirement certainly proves that he is courageous, realistic and a fine person. Every player has to end his career...either you are forced to ..or kicked out ..leave when everyone is fed up with your poor performance...OR leave with pride ... others ( like Afridi, Yunus , Misbah) should learn from Andrew..

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 17:20 GMT

    Let's face it, overall he did a great job for England - took them from nobodys to test rank 1 - who would have believed it!?!

    So well done Strauss.

    But I can't help feeling he undercooked it a little ... left a little early. He hardly seems to have been on the scene for a whole career... but I suppose he might think that World no. 1 ranking is enough of an achievement... but staying there at no. 1 is always the biggest achievement; very few can or have ever achiveed that for any meaningful length of time.

  • POSTED BY Umms on | August 30, 2012, 16:08 GMT

    A treat to watch when he is in full form, great backfoot player. wish you all the best, message from Pakistani fan

  • POSTED BY getsetgopk on | August 30, 2012, 15:44 GMT

    I was waiting for this article from Mark, boy he knows how to write. Straussy what a character you are. Was a damn good bat in his pomp and achieved alot, a good leader, silent and selfless stayed the course untill time caught up with him, catches up with every one in the end, one of my favorite England captains, Eng would be wise to keep him around their setup. Best wishes!

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 15:32 GMT

    I'm an Aussie and a cricket fan. Mr Strauss...leave with your head VERY high. I congratulate you. You beat Australia in your country...and in ours...VERY few captains can have that in their memoirs. You acted with dignity and strength. I have immense respect for you. Good that you chose your own time. England will miss you, and yes you DO Leave a big set of shoes. You were also a damn fine bat. All the best from a died in the wool Aussie

  • POSTED BY Ram.chandra on | August 30, 2012, 15:00 GMT

    Strauss is good player and an excellent captain....however, his recent form as captain (read captaincy) lost its sheen after loosing 3-0 to Pakistan, 1-1 with Sri Lanka and 2-0 against SA, England as the No.1 test team hasn't done really well in sub-continental conditions....A long and tough tour of INDIA ahead for England, he probably thought that its better to retire before the Indian series.

  • POSTED BY Selassie-I on | August 30, 2012, 14:32 GMT

    @DaisonGarvasis - Some players do average over 50 or nearly 60, however they don't play half their matches in England where we don't have games that barely reach the 2nd innings after 5 days with each team scoring 600+ dec. on a featherbed. Mark - Well written as always my friend, strauss is a true great of the game, not specifically for his on field achievements but for his all round professionalism and honourable behaviour.. a true role model.

  • POSTED BY Ms.Cricket on | August 30, 2012, 14:10 GMT

    Surely surely with the challenging Indian tour coming up, this was not the right time for a captain to abandon ship? Where is the team before self now? Strauss never liked playing in the subcontinent.

  • POSTED BY cricketloverw12 on | August 30, 2012, 13:47 GMT

    Nice article Mark. Andrew Strauss has been a marvellous player and captain of England, and his intelligence, dignity and calmness will be sorely missed. He has experienced the full range of selectorial decisions: been stand-in captain, then overlooked, then called upon at crisis time; dropped as a player, and returned successfully. Au revoir. Whether he stays in the game or not, whoever he is working for, and with, will benefit and prosper.

  • POSTED BY A_HTIMAN on | August 30, 2012, 12:29 GMT

    @DaisonGarvasis for an opener 40 is great. When you are low down the order you get more not-outs. Opener has to negotiate with early swing everytime. More than that he won an ashes in Australia. You don't find anyone other than Smith who has lead his side to a series victroy in Australia. For other 7 test nations there is not a single player even who has witnessed a series victory in Australia......

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 12:16 GMT

    One of Mark Nicholas' best for one of England's best! The most fitting tribute that could have been carved out for Andrew Strauss. Well done, Mr. Nicholas!

  • POSTED BY kharidra on | August 30, 2012, 11:49 GMT

    Keeping things simple, keeping the balance, efficiency, elegance, substance without sacrificing style. Visible priorities, Competing within the sporting spirit of the gentleman game.

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 11:30 GMT

    Excellent tribute! Strauss deserves every word of praise in this article. It takes years to carve a niche for yourself in the team as Strauss did.Few people get the respect that Strauss got. He was one of England's best...just like the title says. There was a lot more to Strauss than just being a batsman. Nicholas recognizes it in this article. Those who are jeering at the title of the article just don't see it.

  • POSTED BY katandthat3 on | August 30, 2012, 11:15 GMT

    Agree with @Meety, Strauss was an excellent leader of England but would say he was great tactically. Usually just waited for teams to make mistakes and wasn't proactive (much like Ponting as skipper). Vaughan was sharper with the mind. Still opening in Tests is never easy and to average 40 is still an achievement, especially while leading the side and he had some very successful series, particularly in the Ashes (still like a knife in the heart). Hats off to making the call, he could have gone on and got axed but has passed the baton on to Cook. Interested to see how Cook handles the extra pressure of leading his country in Tests & ODI's, he seems calm & measured enough to handle it. He'll go through lean trotts with the bat so he'll have to bring his captaining skills up and catch everything in the cordon. He's lucky to have Flower in his corner at this stage in his career.

  • POSTED BY DaisonGarvasis on | August 30, 2012, 10:26 GMT

    Looking at the kind of stuff written about Strauss retiring it sounds like one of the "all time greates" just retired!!! Well its just that England doesnt have many great ones to retire that they have to "celebrate" every "not so bad ones" retiring. Come on guys, he is an opening batsman and averages 40 in tests. Look at some other retirements happening around and some guys in top 3 averages close to 60 and some guys batting way down the order avarages close to 50 and you are talking about an opening batsman with an average of 40 reitiring????? Gimme a break

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 9:19 GMT

    Well Played Sir. Thanks all given the Game , Started in RSA. And ended with RSA.

    A complete circle.enjoy whatever life destiny throws at you. Dankie Boet.

  • POSTED BY RandyOZ on | August 30, 2012, 9:16 GMT

    The title is a bit of a joke right? One of England's best? I know theyve never really had any legends but Strauss? Surely not.

  • POSTED BY Alexk400 on | August 30, 2012, 9:09 GMT

    England will be thrashed without strauss leading..its more of crowd energy... Currently every team does well in their domestic

  • POSTED BY braddlesaus on | August 30, 2012, 8:18 GMT

    A shock to hear Strauss had retired. Following the series a bit , the K.P. thing is obviously a big deal , much more than the public knows. He was at least as good as Trescothick , i think the Australian team valued his wicket much more. His batting against S.A. over there in the early 2000's was compared to Brian Lara , not a bad compliment.

  • POSTED BY Tigg on | August 30, 2012, 7:50 GMT

    There's only one thing I disagree with in this article. There are plenty of batsmen capable of replacing Strauss.

    As openers: Compton, Nash, Carberry, Hales.

    Alternatively Trott could move up and Hildreth, Malan, Woakes, Buttler, Ali (amongst others) could come into the middle order.

  • POSTED BY rket on | August 30, 2012, 7:49 GMT

    Strauss is a great person and cricketer as well. We miss him. But, we need these cricketers stop retiring in the off season. Recently Laxman and now Strauss. There're plenty of fans who want to see their heroes bat for the last time and these sudden retirements don't give them that opportunity. Ponting, Dravid, Laxman. Strauss. trend continues. I love all these guys. but the way they retired is something that I don't like.

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 7:40 GMT

    The good news for Alastair Cook (considering what has happened to 3 English captains now after a series against RSA) is he as captain of England does not have to lead or play against SouthAfrica for quite some time, thanks to BCCI's weird future test program.

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 6:55 GMT

    Excellent tribute, Mark, for one of the best England has had. And yes, he's English. To say he was South African (albeit born there) would be like saying Ted Dexter was Italian or Colin Cowdrey was Indian! From the day he scored a ton on debut to the day he hung up his hat, everything Andrew Strauss has done was with dignity, professionalism, and decency. Whatever criticisms others may have about his (maybe) conservative tactics -- look what he did at building a team, taking it to the top, and making England supporters cheer. He led England in a dominance over the old friends (not REALLY enemy Oz!) that was the pinnacle of his career. He always handled everything that came his way in a manner that every young athlete should emulate, a great example to others, and what more could one want in a leader? So what if he doesn't go down as one of the greats in some eyes -- he was, and is, pretty darned good. Thanks Straussy!

  • POSTED BY Romanticstud on | August 30, 2012, 5:48 GMT

    It is rare that one achieves a hatrick ... Graeme Smith has achieved a different type of a hatrick ... Hussain, Vaughan, Strauss ... Smith 3 ... England 0 ... Keep SA flying high ...

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 5:46 GMT

    An ode to a wonderful cricketer !!

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 5:43 GMT

    Really when he made captain I thought that he is not best suited but he did a remarkable job...he was a silent captain never cry never outspoken...just like Hensie Cronje...now I feel said about him..but the way he retire is an example to many. I wish him best luck for the life...you are the ambassador for Cricket...

  • POSTED BY Patchmaster on | August 30, 2012, 5:42 GMT

    Thanks for leading us ENG fans to two Ashes victories and a whitewash of India. You led this side to number 1 rankings. You can retire knowing you did a wonderful job. Great timing. Great man.

  • POSTED BY Meety on | August 30, 2012, 5:34 GMT

    Strategically conservative/negative as captain, inspirational as a leader. Captain during a time of great success for England. Where to next for England? Cook will have a lot on his shoulders. He is now in charge of a team that is stuttering, & his first assignment is in India!

  • POSTED BY DirkL on | August 30, 2012, 5:32 GMT

    Mark, not since Neville Cardus has anyone written a cricket article like this. You bring in Bob Dylan, Neville might have brought in Gustav Mahler, but like him, you make us feel that cricket is a noble cultural pursuit. You allow us to forget the petty bickerings of the losers, the graceless gloating of the winners. As Grantland Rice put it: "For when the One Great Scorer comes to mark against your name, he writes - not that you won or lost, but how you played the Game."

  • POSTED BY thebrotherswaugh on | August 30, 2012, 4:29 GMT

    Now that's a good one!!! I guess it's a true reflection on the fact that ENG haven't had many good one's of late. A batsmen who picked his targets very carefully. Couldn't score consistent runs against quality attacks. An average captain at best - just goes to show that good fortune plays a huge part in the role - he must have been the luckiest captain of all time. But at least he retired with dignity, unlike a certain 'great' from IND. I expect Cook will struggle, having inherited a side that is misfiring on all cylinders. Very poor bowling side, were massively over-rated but recent form is the true form; batting department is equally woeful. Best player is Prior - he'll be busted inside a year from carrying the rest of the team.

  • POSTED BY Webba84 on | August 30, 2012, 2:57 GMT

    I never particularly liked Strauss either as a captain or a batsman but he earns my respect for the way he has handled this. England cricket has been lucky to have him.

  • POSTED BY BurmaStu on | August 30, 2012, 2:42 GMT

    What is it with England captains going out on a low? Strauss was a brilliant captain and a damn fine opener too. And that innings in the World Cup? Pure genius. Sad to see him leaving like this. I'm also sad to say I don't like this story at all, not happy Nickolas! Big boots to fill "Cookie".

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 2:32 GMT

    Good timing. He did a great job as captain. On a different note look at the pet names of all the England players- Strauss (Straussy), Cook (Cooky), Trott (Trotty), Broady, Finny etc etc. 0/10 for imagination. No wonder Pietersen (KP) doesn't fit in. Perhaps Pieterseny might.

  • POSTED BY Lmaotsetung on | August 30, 2012, 1:54 GMT

    Very different from Nasser and Vaughn. Both gave up the captaincy but still went on to continue playing. Nasser still played for Eng after while Vaughn tried to regain his form by playing some county cricket but injury finally took its toll. In Strauss' case he's retiring for good. Not even playing for Middlesex like his Paul Collingwood still doing for Durham.

  • POSTED BY hornet18 on | August 30, 2012, 1:09 GMT

    As an Aussie I remember being amused when Strauss was made England captain - he just didn't strike me as captain material. I now feel compelled to acknowledge him for what he was and that is a captain who lead by example, was cool in a crisis and who was just basically a good leader of men. And a more than fair batsmen to boot. It wasn't spectacular, in fact a bit like a coal miner at the end of the day. He didn't draw much attention but while you weren't watching the job got done and he walks home with the knowledge a goods day work is in the bag. Enjoy retirement Andrew as you hang your hat on a good career. Oh, and you married an Aussie......good job!

  • POSTED BY shanks_sr on | August 29, 2012, 22:14 GMT

    a great cricketer, gave his 100%. Took captaincy at a tough time. all the best for his future. Straussy will be missed.

  • POSTED BY ATIMAYANK on | August 29, 2012, 21:38 GMT

    Nice timing Strauss. His form had deserted him and that was affecting his captaincy. A true gentalman and sure one of the most widely respected. Same happened to Indian captain, but such is the stubbornness of Dhoni that even after having a worse record than Strauss in both batting and captaincy in TESTS he is refusing to resign from Test captainship.

  • POSTED BY on | August 29, 2012, 19:47 GMT

    I liked the fifth paragraph d most...:P

  • POSTED BY Cpt.Meanster on | August 29, 2012, 19:39 GMT

    From an Ashes perspective, YES ! he is clearly one of England's best. Other than that, he had lead England to many victories against other nations. The most recent being the 4-0 drubbing of India. England would have been delighted to have him on board for at least the Indian tour. Now, they are going to struggle without an experienced head guiding them. Strauss also has a terrific record against India. He has played some memorable knocks against India in the sub-continent. The most recent being that wonderful knock during the world cup in Bangalore. I am REALLY worried for England's chances now and I am only an outsider. I personally liked Strauss a lot because of his calm and composed outlook on things. Cook will have one hell of a time on his hands. Since yesterday he would have thought - "5 ODIs and then off to you Straussy". Now, a bigger challenge awaits him should he be chosen as the next test captain. So sad.

  • POSTED BY Venkat_Super_11 on | August 29, 2012, 19:22 GMT

    Wonderful and crisp article. I love the words "Best to go when they ask why, not when". Sachin, do you hear this? I personally feel sorry to see Andrew Strauss go but that's sports. While hundreds of youngsters are waiting to breathe the national team air, Sachin is still holding his seat tight. I wish Strauss' message gives Sachin some sense. (sorry to go away from Strauss' subject). Best of luck, Mr.Strauss and thank you very much to your contribution to world cricket. You are an wonderful and well behaved sportsman.

  • POSTED BY AdrianVanDenStael on | August 29, 2012, 18:50 GMT

    "He ... held more catches in an England shirt than any man." This should be qualified by adding "as a fielder in tests". Several England wicketkeepers have held more catches in an England shirt, and among England fielders, if ODIs (and twenty20 cricket) are included in the analysis, Collingwood has taken more catches than Strauss.

  • POSTED BY SurlyCynic on | August 29, 2012, 18:20 GMT

    Fortress England has lost its general. Sad times, tough to see him raise the white flag.

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  • POSTED BY SurlyCynic on | August 29, 2012, 18:20 GMT

    Fortress England has lost its general. Sad times, tough to see him raise the white flag.

  • POSTED BY AdrianVanDenStael on | August 29, 2012, 18:50 GMT

    "He ... held more catches in an England shirt than any man." This should be qualified by adding "as a fielder in tests". Several England wicketkeepers have held more catches in an England shirt, and among England fielders, if ODIs (and twenty20 cricket) are included in the analysis, Collingwood has taken more catches than Strauss.

  • POSTED BY Venkat_Super_11 on | August 29, 2012, 19:22 GMT

    Wonderful and crisp article. I love the words "Best to go when they ask why, not when". Sachin, do you hear this? I personally feel sorry to see Andrew Strauss go but that's sports. While hundreds of youngsters are waiting to breathe the national team air, Sachin is still holding his seat tight. I wish Strauss' message gives Sachin some sense. (sorry to go away from Strauss' subject). Best of luck, Mr.Strauss and thank you very much to your contribution to world cricket. You are an wonderful and well behaved sportsman.

  • POSTED BY Cpt.Meanster on | August 29, 2012, 19:39 GMT

    From an Ashes perspective, YES ! he is clearly one of England's best. Other than that, he had lead England to many victories against other nations. The most recent being the 4-0 drubbing of India. England would have been delighted to have him on board for at least the Indian tour. Now, they are going to struggle without an experienced head guiding them. Strauss also has a terrific record against India. He has played some memorable knocks against India in the sub-continent. The most recent being that wonderful knock during the world cup in Bangalore. I am REALLY worried for England's chances now and I am only an outsider. I personally liked Strauss a lot because of his calm and composed outlook on things. Cook will have one hell of a time on his hands. Since yesterday he would have thought - "5 ODIs and then off to you Straussy". Now, a bigger challenge awaits him should he be chosen as the next test captain. So sad.

  • POSTED BY on | August 29, 2012, 19:47 GMT

    I liked the fifth paragraph d most...:P

  • POSTED BY ATIMAYANK on | August 29, 2012, 21:38 GMT

    Nice timing Strauss. His form had deserted him and that was affecting his captaincy. A true gentalman and sure one of the most widely respected. Same happened to Indian captain, but such is the stubbornness of Dhoni that even after having a worse record than Strauss in both batting and captaincy in TESTS he is refusing to resign from Test captainship.

  • POSTED BY shanks_sr on | August 29, 2012, 22:14 GMT

    a great cricketer, gave his 100%. Took captaincy at a tough time. all the best for his future. Straussy will be missed.

  • POSTED BY hornet18 on | August 30, 2012, 1:09 GMT

    As an Aussie I remember being amused when Strauss was made England captain - he just didn't strike me as captain material. I now feel compelled to acknowledge him for what he was and that is a captain who lead by example, was cool in a crisis and who was just basically a good leader of men. And a more than fair batsmen to boot. It wasn't spectacular, in fact a bit like a coal miner at the end of the day. He didn't draw much attention but while you weren't watching the job got done and he walks home with the knowledge a goods day work is in the bag. Enjoy retirement Andrew as you hang your hat on a good career. Oh, and you married an Aussie......good job!

  • POSTED BY Lmaotsetung on | August 30, 2012, 1:54 GMT

    Very different from Nasser and Vaughn. Both gave up the captaincy but still went on to continue playing. Nasser still played for Eng after while Vaughn tried to regain his form by playing some county cricket but injury finally took its toll. In Strauss' case he's retiring for good. Not even playing for Middlesex like his Paul Collingwood still doing for Durham.

  • POSTED BY on | August 30, 2012, 2:32 GMT

    Good timing. He did a great job as captain. On a different note look at the pet names of all the England players- Strauss (Straussy), Cook (Cooky), Trott (Trotty), Broady, Finny etc etc. 0/10 for imagination. No wonder Pietersen (KP) doesn't fit in. Perhaps Pieterseny might.