April 17, 2013

CMJ: broadcaster, writer, gentleman

Cricket's greatest friend combined courtesy with a strong sense of authenticity
16

The idea of a gentleman is often mocked but it never dies. When Rahul Dravid retired from cricket, I wrote about the centrality of Dravid's gentlemanliness, how it transmitted itself from the crease to the stands, why the concept was attached to him throughout the cricketing world:

The word is often misunderstood. Gentlemanliness is not mere surface charm - the easy lightness of confident sociability. Far from it: the real gentleman doesn't run around flattering everyone in sight, he makes sure he fulfils his duties and obligations without drawing attention to himself or making a fuss. Gentlemanliness is as much about restraint as it is about appearances. Above all, a gentleman is not only courteous, he is also constant: always the same, whatever the circumstances or the company.

That paragraph applies equally to another gentleman, also a man of cricket, this time a broadcaster and writer rather than a player: Christopher Martin-Jenkins. Yesterday, over 2000 people gathered in St Paul's Cathedral in London for Christopher's memorial service, to mark his death and to celebrate his life.

It was much more than just a cricketing occasion. Among the congregation were leading figures from politics, the media and the Church. Surrounded by the Baroque splendour of one of the world's greatest Anglican cathedrals, we heard poems by AE Housman and John Betjeman - both writers steeped in English landscape and rural life - and sang hymns by Charles Wesley.

It was a social snapshot of a certain strand of Englishness. In 1993, John Major, then prime minister, hoped that "fifty years on from now, Britain will still be the country of long shadows on cricket grounds, warm beer, invincible green suburbs… and, as George Orwell said, 'Old maids bicycling to holy communion through the morning mist.'" On yesterday's evidence, something of that vision has already survived the first twenty of those fifty years.

ESPNcricinfo is a global site and I realise that some readers will not know Christopher's work. So let me describe the qualities that ran through his print journalism, mostly for the Daily Telegraph and the Times, and his broadcasting, where he was a much loved voice on the BBC's Test Match Special.

Some people have a civilising influence on everything they touch. Christopher was one of those people. His careful use of language, his unfailing courtesy, his determination to look for the good, his reluctance to turn the knife - colleagues, listeners and readers absorbed these things subconsciously, both on the page and over the airways. Above all, despite his great inside knowledge, Christopher retained the freshness of the enthusiast. The job never became just "a job".

"He was cricket's greatest friend," as his colleague Mike Selvey put it. It was a friendship based on love. But to say that Christopher "loved" cricket needs to be expanded. The word is thrown around too lightly. We love this, we love that, we come and go with our loves. Christopher not only loved cricket, he revered it. He took a deep interest in cricket, as a loving parent would care about the well-being of a child. And he cared for every aspect of the game, as though cricketers of all abilities still belonged to the same tradition, the same family. He cared about the game's grassroots as much as about World Cups and iconic series. He hated the idea that the game was just a pyramid of excellence, for which the sole justification was the cultivation of a highly paid professional elite. Cricket was an end in itself, a strand of the human condition, perhaps even an ennobling one.

Christopher knew that beauty was central to the magic of cricket. In its expressiveness and subtlety, cricket can touch the arts more frequently than most sports. Sir Tim Rice's tribute recalled that Christopher's favourite player was Tom Graveney, who made over 100 first-class hundreds for Gloucestershire, Worcestershire and England. Rather than brute force or mechanical efficiency, Graveney batted with elegance and grace - qualities Christopher looked out for throughout his career describing the game.

He hated the idea that the game was just a pyramid of excellence, for which the sole justification was the cultivation of a highly paid professional elite. Cricket was an end in itself, a strand of the human condition, perhaps even an ennobling one

Another tribute singled out Christopher's natural courtesy and manners. Those qualities were integral to his radio commentary - the patience with which he dealt with colleagues, the attentiveness he paid to the game. He did not use charm to pursue his own agenda; his manners allowed those around him to pursue theirs.

Courtesy coexisted with a strong sense of authenticity. Christopher never said or did anything remotely phoney, and that goes a long way to explaining why he connected with people, why he enhanced their enjoyment of cricket. He would not have touched so many readers and listeners if he had tried to adopt the common touch or artificially dumbed down. He stayed true to himself, without hinting at caricature. His career showed that you do not "connect" with people by aping demotic tastes. You merely demean yourself.

During the service, a recording was played of some of the greatest moments of Christopher's radio commentary, spread across his 50-year career. In a few seconds, we heard his voice mellow and soften with several decades' experience of cricket and life.

For me, hearing that famous voice once again was the most moving moment. So many memories, so instantly recalled. Christopher described the sense of hope and optimism that greeted the first Test hundred by a 17-year-old prodigy called Sachin Tendulkar. He captured the anxious thrill of listening to Kevin Pietersen's counter-attacking hundred at The Oval that secured the Ashes in 2005.

Listening again, I remembered where I was at each moment, reflected how deeply cricket is intertwined with other aspects of life. The warmth of summer memories, the happiness and sense of security that cricket brings, washed over me. Nostalgia? Perhaps. But nostalgia, too, is a form of reverence for the past.

As cricket celebrated the life of a gentleman yesterday, I reflected on a final irony. It is very rare, in this age of professionalism and self-promotion, to hear much about the ideal of gentility. And yet so many people, of all backgrounds, instinctively know a gentleman when they see one - or even when they just hear him speak on the radio.

Ed Smith's book, Luck - A Fresh Look at Fortune, is out in paperback in April 2013. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on April 17, 2013, 9:24 GMT

    CMJ's voice oozed uncontrolled love & passion for cricket. he would speak like a friend with his hand around your shoulder but he was the best happened to the radio commentary & it was our good luck that we could enjoy the game as much as his English, his sweet voice & his wonderful knowledge of the game. I would rank him alongside Tony Cozier, Allen McGillvary, Jim Maxwell, Brian Johnston & John Arlott. Thanks very much Ed for remembering hm.

  • Kunal-Talgeri on April 17, 2013, 7:59 GMT

    Lovely ode to CMJ, Ed! I live in India and, thanks to my father, my teens were spent in browsing through copies of Wisden (under Mr David Frith) and The Cricketer (under Mr Christopher Martin-Jenkins) circa early '90s. We used to get it by post. The internet was unheard of in Indian neighbourhoods. In that backdrop, I found CMJ's curation of articles to be as globally relevant as possible. I remember reading the Old Trafford Test coverage, delighted that Tendulkar's influence on a Test series had been cast in print for the outside world to see. For that 11-year-old reader, it meant something. You're right about his objectivity and caring attitude toward the game. I wish I could have grown up on BBC Test Match Specials too.

  • charlie1863 on April 18, 2013, 11:31 GMT

    Listening to CMJ's voice describing the game at its finest (in all its incarnations was an absolute sensual delight and was unmistakably CLASSY, POETIC, CHARMING, ENTERTAINING and yet extremely INFORMATIVE. I have had the pleasure of listening to all TMS/ABC?SABC/WI/NZ commentators from 1971 and CMJ remains PEERLESS and we'll certainly miss him at this year's ASHES. May this remarkable GENTLEMAN's sould REST in PEACE. Many thanks to Ed-SMITH for reliving all those memories for us with this IMMACULATE PIECE.

  • on April 18, 2013, 10:10 GMT

    Wonderful and heartfelt. Heard CMJ for the first time some +40 years ago and am thankful for the years of moments he put across.

  • on April 18, 2013, 1:33 GMT

    Truly one of the best radio commentators that we have seen.

  • panduman on April 17, 2013, 21:34 GMT

    Great article. I vilified Mr. Smith on a previous article about test cricket being a religion. It was never published by Cricinfo!! However he has more than made amends with this one. It evokes that very unique legacy cricket carries on its shoulders . Ed Smith is shaping up to be a contemporary Cardus.

  • AlexfromPessac on April 17, 2013, 18:26 GMT

    I was lucky enough to meet him in 1990 as a schoolboy cricketer at a dinner in Bath. He came to our table to talk to us and was very kind. Peter Roebuck, the other speaker at the dinner, stayed on his own at the top table... Lovely man, lovely voice.

  • shillingsworth on April 17, 2013, 17:29 GMT

    SPA001 - It is unfortunate that, in rightly paying tribute to CMJ, you imply that Brian Johnston did not respect Asian cricket. Nothing could be further from the truth. You may have a point about Swanton but, as you can't even get his name right, I doubt it.

  • on April 17, 2013, 15:37 GMT

    I was lucky to share a commentary box with CMJ at Chelmsford when I was asked to score on TMS for a B& H between Essex and Yorkshire in 2002. The first question he asked me was "Have we met before?" which we hadn't. A true professional and I was delighted to see a master at work.

  • landl47 on April 17, 2013, 11:53 GMT

    I always think of CMJ as a very English person- even though I'm old enough to remember Test Match Special without CMJ, he personifies the English style of commentary to me. A nice article about a nice man.

  • on April 17, 2013, 9:24 GMT

    CMJ's voice oozed uncontrolled love & passion for cricket. he would speak like a friend with his hand around your shoulder but he was the best happened to the radio commentary & it was our good luck that we could enjoy the game as much as his English, his sweet voice & his wonderful knowledge of the game. I would rank him alongside Tony Cozier, Allen McGillvary, Jim Maxwell, Brian Johnston & John Arlott. Thanks very much Ed for remembering hm.

  • Kunal-Talgeri on April 17, 2013, 7:59 GMT

    Lovely ode to CMJ, Ed! I live in India and, thanks to my father, my teens were spent in browsing through copies of Wisden (under Mr David Frith) and The Cricketer (under Mr Christopher Martin-Jenkins) circa early '90s. We used to get it by post. The internet was unheard of in Indian neighbourhoods. In that backdrop, I found CMJ's curation of articles to be as globally relevant as possible. I remember reading the Old Trafford Test coverage, delighted that Tendulkar's influence on a Test series had been cast in print for the outside world to see. For that 11-year-old reader, it meant something. You're right about his objectivity and caring attitude toward the game. I wish I could have grown up on BBC Test Match Specials too.

  • charlie1863 on April 18, 2013, 11:31 GMT

    Listening to CMJ's voice describing the game at its finest (in all its incarnations was an absolute sensual delight and was unmistakably CLASSY, POETIC, CHARMING, ENTERTAINING and yet extremely INFORMATIVE. I have had the pleasure of listening to all TMS/ABC?SABC/WI/NZ commentators from 1971 and CMJ remains PEERLESS and we'll certainly miss him at this year's ASHES. May this remarkable GENTLEMAN's sould REST in PEACE. Many thanks to Ed-SMITH for reliving all those memories for us with this IMMACULATE PIECE.

  • on April 18, 2013, 10:10 GMT

    Wonderful and heartfelt. Heard CMJ for the first time some +40 years ago and am thankful for the years of moments he put across.

  • on April 18, 2013, 1:33 GMT

    Truly one of the best radio commentators that we have seen.

  • panduman on April 17, 2013, 21:34 GMT

    Great article. I vilified Mr. Smith on a previous article about test cricket being a religion. It was never published by Cricinfo!! However he has more than made amends with this one. It evokes that very unique legacy cricket carries on its shoulders . Ed Smith is shaping up to be a contemporary Cardus.

  • AlexfromPessac on April 17, 2013, 18:26 GMT

    I was lucky enough to meet him in 1990 as a schoolboy cricketer at a dinner in Bath. He came to our table to talk to us and was very kind. Peter Roebuck, the other speaker at the dinner, stayed on his own at the top table... Lovely man, lovely voice.

  • shillingsworth on April 17, 2013, 17:29 GMT

    SPA001 - It is unfortunate that, in rightly paying tribute to CMJ, you imply that Brian Johnston did not respect Asian cricket. Nothing could be further from the truth. You may have a point about Swanton but, as you can't even get his name right, I doubt it.

  • on April 17, 2013, 15:37 GMT

    I was lucky to share a commentary box with CMJ at Chelmsford when I was asked to score on TMS for a B& H between Essex and Yorkshire in 2002. The first question he asked me was "Have we met before?" which we hadn't. A true professional and I was delighted to see a master at work.

  • landl47 on April 17, 2013, 11:53 GMT

    I always think of CMJ as a very English person- even though I'm old enough to remember Test Match Special without CMJ, he personifies the English style of commentary to me. A nice article about a nice man.

  • cloudmess on April 17, 2013, 11:30 GMT

    Lovely article on a very fine commentator and man. Also liked Smith's allusion that cricket has this way of shaping our memories, even when we are not playing it ourselves.

  • SPA001 on April 17, 2013, 9:47 GMT

    My personal connection with CMJ was through the arirways, whilst listening to him on TMS in Sialkot & Rawalpindi in the early 1980s. And there was Fred Trueman, Don Mosey & Trevor Bailey too. But I grew to prefer his writing to his broadcasting.

    CMJ was indeed a caring soul. In a brief chat with him in the Media box at Lord's in August 2010, I found him, as Ed Smith describes, with all the best of an English gentleman. Hope I am allowed to say this, CMJ in sharp contrast to the likes of Bill Swanton and Brian Johnston, cared for the game far beyond the old conventional ways. The four sub-continental cricket nations - India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka & Bangladesh - was accorded due respect. RIP.

  • Nutcutlet on April 17, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    A lovely & poignant tribute to a man who personified all that is best in a genuinely courteous English gentleman of the old school. CM-J exercised his gift for finding the right words & putting them unerringly in their right places for the pleasure of all of us fortunate enough to share his world.. Thank you, Ed.

  • CricketAkshay on April 17, 2013, 9:18 GMT

    Nice article. He's a true gentleman. A great tribute Ed Smith to CMJ

  • on April 17, 2013, 7:24 GMT

    Really really sad...My late grandfather was an avid reader and listener and every time I'd go over, he'd always keep me informed on CMJ...RIP

  • on April 17, 2013, 6:27 GMT

    wonderful article on CMJ. I grew up listening to him in BBC Test Match Special along with John Arlott, Brian Johnston, Fred Trueman and Trevor Bailey. CMJ brought such a passion to his commentary and delighted his listeners all over the world.

  • on April 17, 2013, 6:27 GMT

    wonderful article on CMJ. I grew up listening to him in BBC Test Match Special along with John Arlott, Brian Johnston, Fred Trueman and Trevor Bailey. CMJ brought such a passion to his commentary and delighted his listeners all over the world.

  • on April 17, 2013, 7:24 GMT

    Really really sad...My late grandfather was an avid reader and listener and every time I'd go over, he'd always keep me informed on CMJ...RIP

  • CricketAkshay on April 17, 2013, 9:18 GMT

    Nice article. He's a true gentleman. A great tribute Ed Smith to CMJ

  • Nutcutlet on April 17, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    A lovely & poignant tribute to a man who personified all that is best in a genuinely courteous English gentleman of the old school. CM-J exercised his gift for finding the right words & putting them unerringly in their right places for the pleasure of all of us fortunate enough to share his world.. Thank you, Ed.

  • SPA001 on April 17, 2013, 9:47 GMT

    My personal connection with CMJ was through the arirways, whilst listening to him on TMS in Sialkot & Rawalpindi in the early 1980s. And there was Fred Trueman, Don Mosey & Trevor Bailey too. But I grew to prefer his writing to his broadcasting.

    CMJ was indeed a caring soul. In a brief chat with him in the Media box at Lord's in August 2010, I found him, as Ed Smith describes, with all the best of an English gentleman. Hope I am allowed to say this, CMJ in sharp contrast to the likes of Bill Swanton and Brian Johnston, cared for the game far beyond the old conventional ways. The four sub-continental cricket nations - India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka & Bangladesh - was accorded due respect. RIP.

  • cloudmess on April 17, 2013, 11:30 GMT

    Lovely article on a very fine commentator and man. Also liked Smith's allusion that cricket has this way of shaping our memories, even when we are not playing it ourselves.

  • landl47 on April 17, 2013, 11:53 GMT

    I always think of CMJ as a very English person- even though I'm old enough to remember Test Match Special without CMJ, he personifies the English style of commentary to me. A nice article about a nice man.

  • on April 17, 2013, 15:37 GMT

    I was lucky to share a commentary box with CMJ at Chelmsford when I was asked to score on TMS for a B& H between Essex and Yorkshire in 2002. The first question he asked me was "Have we met before?" which we hadn't. A true professional and I was delighted to see a master at work.

  • shillingsworth on April 17, 2013, 17:29 GMT

    SPA001 - It is unfortunate that, in rightly paying tribute to CMJ, you imply that Brian Johnston did not respect Asian cricket. Nothing could be further from the truth. You may have a point about Swanton but, as you can't even get his name right, I doubt it.

  • AlexfromPessac on April 17, 2013, 18:26 GMT

    I was lucky enough to meet him in 1990 as a schoolboy cricketer at a dinner in Bath. He came to our table to talk to us and was very kind. Peter Roebuck, the other speaker at the dinner, stayed on his own at the top table... Lovely man, lovely voice.