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Cricketers on their milestones

Murray Goodwin

'I asked for my first autograph when I was 38'

Murray Goodwin talks about facing Shoaib, and bringing out the broom against Murali

Interview by Jack Wilson

November 24, 2013

Comments: 11 | Text size: A | A

Murray Goodwin works to leg, Glamorgan v Northamptonshire, County Championship, Division Two, April 10, 2013
Murray Goodwin scored three Test hundreds in 19 Tests © Getty Images
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Players/Officials: Murray Goodwin
Teams: Zimbabwe

First experiences of cricket
My dad and older brothers all played when I was younger. They were all of a good standard and that helped me develop my game. My parents sacrificed a lot to provide us boys a great opportunity to play all sports when we were kids. I'm very grateful to them for that.

First Test match
It was a weird feeling. I was playing for Western Australia and suddenly I was called up to play Test cricket within a short period of a few months. My first Test was against Sri Lanka - it included Muttiah Muralitharan - in Kandy. I remember the Flower brothers said a few words to me. They went, "Mate, you're going to have to sweep." Murali is a fantastic bowler. He was bending it from the edge of the pitch nearly, so I brought out the broom to try and score!

I wish I'd played more Tests for Zimbabwe. I became a much better player when I was around 30 years old and wish I could have challenged myself against the best then.

First Test hundred
It came in 1998 against Pakistan - and it was very special. All the talk was of Shoaib Akhtar being the fastest in the world, so I was practising facing a new ball from ten metres away before the game. Some were at my head, some at my toes - it was great fun. We were in control of the Test but we just couldn't bowl them out in the second innings and ended up drawing. I made 166 not out, my highest Test score.

First thing young cricketers should learn
To watch the ball, enjoy the game and do the basics for as long as possible. The most important thing is to stay in the present. Once the shot has been played, you relax, then switch on when the bowler runs in.

First time I asked for an autograph
I reckon I was 38! I didn't used to collect them when I was younger but I asked my friend Ricky Ponting to sign my son's hat and have a photo.

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Posted by Phat-Boy on (November 25, 2013, 23:05 GMT)

@Anil koshy.

Get a clue mate. Goodwin left international cricket because his wife could not settle in Zimbabwe - who could blame her given all the strife over there at the time - and so he left. What, should he put cricket over family just because you say so?

Posted by Ashwin_Mysore on (November 25, 2013, 13:33 GMT)

I believe entire Zim team lost out when they were peaking......I remember a tri-series between India, SA and Zim which was tightly fought.....SA were top in the world at that time......Zim challenged them......Goodwin, Flowers, Johnson, Straung, Ervine, Campbell, Streak, Rennie, all played quality cricket at that time

Posted by Anil_Koshy on (November 25, 2013, 4:13 GMT)

The players quit their country to play T20 and County cricket deserve no respect, there is nothing like playing for your country, every cricketer should know, they will get the respect and recognition if they play for their country. Heath Streak and Trent johnson will always be remembered for their contribution to their respective countries. Players like Erwine, Goodwin, Rankin who turned their back on their country will regret after many years.

Posted by Anil_Koshy on (November 25, 2013, 4:04 GMT)

His departure from cricket was a sad loss for cricket, after him Zimbabwe lost very good cricketers like flower brothers, Streak, Strang brothers, Cambell etc.

Had these guys stayed for a longer period, Zimbabwe would have become a big force in cricket.

Posted by deathstarbd on (November 25, 2013, 1:28 GMT)

He was a superb batsman. a devastating one at his time 1998-2001. He along with Neil Johnson brought revolution in the Zim cricket.

Posted by CodandChips on (November 24, 2013, 15:22 GMT)

A good servant of county cricket who played well for Glamorgan last year.

Also don't forget the political situation may have meant that Gary Ballance may have never gone to school in Harrow and could be playing for Zimbabwe at the moment rather than watching the England team get ripped to pieces by Australia.

Posted by ZCFOutkast on (November 24, 2013, 7:20 GMT)

Goodwin was a great player and servant for Zimbabwe cricket in general. Always willing to help the youngsters develop. @Rajesh, how do Rennie & Ervine come close to that list? Taibu, Olonga, Utseya, Paul Strang, Masakadza, Price, Hondo, Taylor, Mupariwa, Watambwa&Chigumbura would surely deserve mention way ahead of those guys! As for Neil Johnson, take his CWC99 run and he's rubbish. Several current Zim players suddenly become superior options to him with bat or ball.

Posted by InsideHedge on (November 24, 2013, 4:34 GMT)

He was defn a good 'un and I agree with him when he says he became a better player in his 30s. Yup, wish he had played more international cricket for Zimbabwe.

Posted by   on (November 24, 2013, 4:05 GMT)

Flower bros, Campbell, Goodwin, Neil Johnson, Rennie, Streak, Ervine....these were probably the best guys to play post Houghton era

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