Murray Goodwin November 24, 2013

'I asked for my first autograph when I was 38'

Murray Goodwin talks about facing Shoaib, and bringing out the broom against Murali

First experiences of cricket
My dad and older brothers all played when I was younger. They were all of a good standard and that helped me develop my game. My parents sacrificed a lot to provide us boys a great opportunity to play all sports when we were kids. I'm very grateful to them for that.

First Test match
It was a weird feeling. I was playing for Western Australia and suddenly I was called up to play Test cricket within a short period of a few months. My first Test was against Sri Lanka - it included Muttiah Muralitharan - in Kandy. I remember the Flower brothers said a few words to me. They went, "Mate, you're going to have to sweep." Murali is a fantastic bowler. He was bending it from the edge of the pitch nearly, so I brought out the broom to try and score!

I wish I'd played more Tests for Zimbabwe. I became a much better player when I was around 30 years old and wish I could have challenged myself against the best then.

First Test hundred
It came in 1998 against Pakistan - and it was very special. All the talk was of Shoaib Akhtar being the fastest in the world, so I was practising facing a new ball from ten metres away before the game. Some were at my head, some at my toes - it was great fun. We were in control of the Test but we just couldn't bowl them out in the second innings and ended up drawing. I made 166 not out, my highest Test score.

First thing young cricketers should learn
To watch the ball, enjoy the game and do the basics for as long as possible. The most important thing is to stay in the present. Once the shot has been played, you relax, then switch on when the bowler runs in.

First time I asked for an autograph
I reckon I was 38! I didn't used to collect them when I was younger but I asked my friend Ricky Ponting to sign my son's hat and have a photo.

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