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Rohit's record, and Ashwin's feat

Also, lowest "missing scores", a hundredth ODI on one's birthday, and West Indians with 20,000 international runs

Steven Lynch

November 12, 2013

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Rohit Sharma acknowledges the crowd after making a ton on his Test debut, India v West Indies, 1st Test, Kolkata, 2nd day, November 7, 2013
Rohit Sharma: 108 ODIs before his Test debut © BCCI
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I noticed that the lowest score Sachin Tendulkar never made in a one-day international is 56. The corresponding number in Tests is 30. Does any other batsman go higher than this in Tests or ODIs? asked Vineet Malani from India

Two people have a higher "missing score" in one-day internationals than Sachin Tendulkar's, which is indeed 56. Inzamam-ul-Haq did make every score up to and including 56, but never finished on 57. But well clear is Ricky Ponting, who made every score from 0 to 70, but never ended up with a 71. Jacques Kallis has also made every score up to but not including 56. In Tests, rather surprisingly perhaps, there are eight players above Tendulkar on the list. Out in front is Andrew Strauss, who made every score from 0 to 40, but never 41. Then come Desmond Haynes (lowest missing score 37), Graham Gooch and Steve Waugh (35), David Boon and Godfrey Evans (33), and Alistair Campbell and Colin Cowdrey (31). Tendulkar and Mark Boucher both never ended up with a score of 30. (Many thanks to ESPNcricinfo's database guru Travis Basevi for his help with this, and some of today's other answers.)

Rohit Sharma played his first Test after more than 100 one-day internationals. Was this a record? asked Seena John from the United Arab Emirates

Before his successful Test debut in Kolkata last week Rohit Sharma had played 108 one-day internationals, which is indeed a record. The previous mark was 98, by another Indian, Suresh Raina - who also marked his long-awaited Test debut (in Colombo in July 2010) with a century. Andrew Symonds played 94 ODIs before making his Test debut for Australia, and Adam Gilchrist 76. The new leader on this particular list is Kieron Pollard, who has played 85 ODIs so far without appearing in a Test. That excludes five Kenyans - Steve Tikolo and Thomas Odoyo (both 134 ODIs), Collins Obuya (102), Kennedy Otieno (90) and Jimmy Kamande (86) - who have obviously never played Test cricket.

Who has dismissed the most different batsmen in a Test series? asked Mike Allen from Australia

Top of this list is Terry Alderman, who dismissed 23 different batsmen during the 1989 Ashes series in England. He's three clear of another Australian, Ted McDonald, who removed 20 different Englishmen in the 1921 Ashes. England used a record 30 different players in 1921, and 29 in 1989, which obviously helped Alderman and McDonald to their respective hauls. More significant, really, is dismissing every opponent you come up against in a series - after all it's not up to the bowler how many players the other side chooses. And I don't think many people would guess the identity of the leading "hundred percenter", who faced 16 different players in one Test series and dismissed them all at least once. It's Ravichandran Ashwin, who removed all 16 Australians he played against in India's four-match home series earlier this year. Subhash Gupte (India v New Zealand in 1955-56), Johnny Wardle (England v South Africa 1956-57) and Bhagwat Chandrasekhar (India v England 1972-73) all came up against 15 different batsmen in a series and dismissed them all.

Gurdeep Singh, who is only 15, opened the batting for Kenya in a one-day international last month. Is he the youngest ODI player of all? asked George Harbinson from Kenya

It's difficult to be entirely sure about this. The left-hand opener Gurdeep Singh was, if the details supplied to ESPNcricinfo by Cricket Kenya are correct, only 15 years 258 days old when he made his full one-day international debut against Afghanistan in Sharjah last month. The only younger player on the list is Hasan Raza, at 14 years 233 days for Pakistan against Zimbabwe in Quetta in October 1996. But serious doubts were raised, not least by the Pakistan Cricket Board, about Raza's age - and I think it is generally accepted that he is at least a year older, possibly a little more, than his published date of birth suggests. For the full list, click here.

Brad Haddin played his 100th one-day international on his birthday. Is this unique? asked Abbas Khambati from India

Brad Haddin's 100th one-day international came against India in Ranchi on October 23, which was his 36th birthday. The only other man to do this was Inzamam-ul-Haq, who made 53 not out against England during the 1995-96 World Cup in Karachi, on what was his 26th birthday. Carl Hooper played his 200th one-day international on his 35th birthday in December 2001 - and scored 72 against Sri Lanka in Kandy.

Shivnarine Chanderpaul went past 20,000 runs in international cricket at Kolkata. Is he the first West Indian player to reach this milestone? asked Richard Webb from Britain

During the Kolkata Test Shivnarine Chanderpaul became the tenth batsman to complete 20,000 runs in all international cricket - but the second from West Indies after Brian Lara, who ended up with 22,358. Top of the list, of course, is Sachin Tendulkar with 34,283 in Tests, one-day and Twenty20 internationals (as of today's date). After him come Ricky Ponting (27,483), Jacques Kallis (25,304), Rahul Dravid (24,208), Kumar Sangakkara (23,541), Mahela Jayawardene (23,493), Lara, Sanath Jayasuriya (21,032), Inzamam-ul-Haq (20,580) and Chanderpaul.

Steven Lynch is the editor of the Wisden Guide to International Cricket 2013. Ask Steven is now on Facebook

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Steven Lynch Steven Lynch won the Wisden Cricket Monthly Christmas Quiz three years running before the then-editor said "I can't let you win it again, but would you like a job?" That lasted for 15 years, before he moved across to the Wisden website when that was set up in 2000. Following the merger of the two sites early in 2003 he was appointed as the global editor of Wisden Cricinfo. In June 2005 he became the deputy editor of Wisden Cricketers' Almanack. He continues to contribute the popular weekly "Ask Steven" question-and-answer column on ESPNcricinfo, and edits the Wisden Guide to International Cricket.

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