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Haroon Rasheed

Impressing Viv and Greg

Former Pakistan batsman Haroon Rasheed on the compliments he received from two batting legends, and his admiration for Gavaskar

Interview by Ijaz Chaudhry

April 17, 2014

Comments: 6 | Text size: A | A

Haroon Rasheed was bowled for 15 by Chris Old, England v Pakistan, 2nd Test, Lord's, 3rd day, July 17, 1978
Haroon Rasheed never forgot his school coach's valuable advice to keep his back foot on the ground © PA Photos
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First piece of cricketing advice I got
My school coach told me that while batting, your back foot should always be on the ground. It should not leave the ground. That helped me a lot.

First time I lost my cool while playing
In 1981, I was captaining United Bank in a Quaid-e-Azam Trophy match. At the start of the last day, we required less than 50 runs with all the wickets intact. I came to know that Nasir Valika, one of our top-order batsmen, had not brought his kit bag. He had the audacity to tell me, "I won't be needed to bat today." In the event, we lost six wickets and Valika had to come at No. 8 after borrowing some kit. We managed to win by four wickets, but I gave him a piece of my mind.

First time I felt I belonged at the highest level
I had scored more than 850 runs at an average of 57 in the 1975-76 domestic season. Haleem Ahmed and Gul Hameed Bhatti, Pakistan's most celebrated cricket writers, wrote highly about me. "A future batting star on the horizon," they called me. That made me believe that I could play at the top level.

First batsman I wanted to bat like
When India came to Pakistan in 1978-79, I was greatly impressed by Sunil Gavaskar. I really liked his technique and temperament. His judgement about leaving balls was extraordinary. Despite the absence of any outstanding fast bowlers in the Indian domestic circuit, he played Imran Khan and Sarfraz Nawaz so well. He became my role model.

First compliment I got from a famous international cricketer
At the end of the day's play, after I had got a hundred against Queensland in 1976-77, Majid Khan told me that Greg Chappell and Viv Richards wanted to see me. I went to the Queensland dressing room, where the two batting legends had words of praise for me. They especially admired my technique against the fast bowlers.

Ijaz Chaudhry writes on cricket and other sports. For more about him and samples of his published work, visit www.sportscorrespondent.info

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Posted by PlayfromDallas on (April 21, 2014, 21:54 GMT)

Haroon Rashid came into international cricketing stage when Pakistan had very strong batting lineout this batting strength can be measured by the presence of five Pakistani batsmen on the top order of Kerry Packer World XI i.e. 1-Majid Khan (opener with B Richard), 2-Zaheer (played at 3), 3-Asif I (at 5), 4-Mushtaq M (at 6), 5-Imran K (at 7) and Mindad who wasn't in Packer in the early part. It was very difficult for players like Haroon, Muddsar, W Raja, Azmat Rana, Mohsin, Tasleem Arif to crack a position in the Pakistani team. Haroon has done quite well against Eng, and Ausi quick Thompson & Lilly, he had 12 sixes record in a century against Eng in 1978 at Hydrabad. Tasleem Arif and David Hooks (May their soul rests in peace) are the only two players who played Packer before playing the Test!!! Haroon also drafted for the Packer later. Haroon has 7 brother all of'em have played 1st class which was world record for a long time; 6 of'em are batsmen & one is wicketkeeper Ahmed Rasheed.

Posted by george204 on (April 18, 2014, 12:12 GMT)

I remember Haroon Rasheed getting bowled by Mike Hendrick - the off & leg stumps were out of the ground but the middle was still standing. I'd never seen that happen before & never since.

Posted by   on (April 17, 2014, 15:26 GMT)

@Paiji You are being unfair to Haroon by saying he was clueless against moving ball. As a matter of fact, the entire batting line up was clueless against the in-air swing of Ian Botham. That included the mighty Miandad. With the exception of Sadiq no batsmen played a test in England before. Majid, Zaheer, Mushtaq, Asif, Imran were all banned for taking part in Packer circus. When Sarfaraz bowled in the third test, he swung the ball like Botham and troubled English batsmen the same way.

It was the criticism of his 11 off 10 overs in world cup that made him demoralized and he subsequently lost his form.

Posted by J751 on (April 17, 2014, 11:03 GMT)

Haroon had to try and find a place in a formidable Pakistan batting line up.His debut series against Australia was promising and later he made two hundreds against the visiting England side in 1977-78.He struggled in English conditions on the 1978 tour and the 1979 World Cup.Given more opportunities, possibly his Test record could have been better.

Posted by   on (April 17, 2014, 10:05 GMT)

Viv Richards and Greg Chappell praising your batting. That's praise worth having.

Posted by Paiji on (April 17, 2014, 9:02 GMT)

Haroon Rashid scored copiously in the first class games in Pakistan during the mid-70's. He was the only one outside the Test regulars who was hooking the likes of Asif Masood and Salim Altaf with aplomb and power. His 57 against Australia on his Test debut (I think in Sydney 1973) was the high point of this career when O'Reilly declared him to be a major talent. Then onwards, eEverything was downhill for the burly Haroon. His trip to England was a particular disaster where he proved clueless against the moving ball. At Lord's, he was preferred over the vastly superior Hasan Jamil, a choice that probably cost Pakistan the game. Hasan Jamil, one of the finest all-rounders in the history of Pakistan cricket, was to run pillar to post, frustrated endlessly in his quest to break into the Test side, even though he was briefly a key player in the 50 over game.

To sum Haroon Rashid was the archetype Pakistani flat track bully.

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