December 9, 2013

It's a draw!

After Darren Bravo's superb effort in Dunedin, a look at some other famous match-saving innings in Tests
83

Hanif Mohammad
Probably the greatest - and certainly the longest - match-saving innings of all. Hanif opened Pakistan's follow-on in Bridgetown in January 1958 facing a first-innings deficit of 473. He went in near the end of the second of the game's six days, with the position seemingly hopeless: but, defying a West Indian attack spearheaded by the fearsome Roy Gilchrist, and the Caribbean sun, which burned layers of skin off his face, Hanif batted deep into the final day, surviving for 970 minutes in all in scoring 337, and Pakistan escaped with a draw.

Mike Atherton
Set 479 to win in Johannesburg in December 1995, England escaped with a draw, thanks to an epic innings from their captain, Mike Atherton, who defied Allan Donald, Shaun Pollock and friends for 643 minutes, finishing with 185 not out, the highest score of his 115-Test career. England might still have lost had Atherton not been joined on the final day by the similarly adhesive Jack Russell, who defended for more than four and a half hours himself in scoring 29 not out.

Andy Flower
Among Flower's many single-handed rescue efforts, the one in Nagpur in November 2000 stands out. Zimbabwe had followed on 227 behind, and were 61 for 3 when Flower came in halfway through the fourth day. He dug in against a handy Indian attack - including Javagal Srinath and Zaheer Khan - and was still there at the end, after 544 minutes and 444 balls. His 232 not out remains the highest Test score by a wicketkeeper.

Dennis Amiss
In Kingston in February 1974, England started their second innings 230 behind West Indies, and lost five wickets clearing the deficit. No one made more than 38… except the doughty Warwickshire opener Amiss, who was still there at the end with 262 not out after 570 minutes. When the draw was agreed, England had 432 for 9 - only the fact that Bob Willis remained not out prevented Amiss from claiming the record for the highest score by an opener carrying his bat.

Bruce Mitchell
The summer of 1947 is mainly remembered now for the run-soaked batting of Denis Compton and Bill Edrich. But although the South African tourists were outgunned in the Tests, they did have some batting heroes of their own: foremost among them was Mitchell, nowhere near as easy on the eye as Compo, but mightily effective. In the final Test, at The Oval, Mitchell staved off a 4-0 defeat with 189 not out, and in fact took South Africa - who finished with 423 for 7 chasing 451 - close to an upset victory. Mitchell had scored 120 in the first innings, too, and was only off the field for eight minutes during the entire match.

Willie Watson and Trevor Bailey
This famous double rearguard saved the 1953 Lord's Test, and allowed England to regain the Ashes after 19 years with victory in the final Test later in the summer. England were 12 for 3 in their second innings when Watson came in, and 73 for 4 when Bailey joined him. They stonewalled for more than four hours, adding 163, effectively saving the match: although Bailey - after the innings that established his reputation as a barn-door blocker - was finally out 40 minutes before the close, the tail remained firm.

Ricky Ponting
The match after the 2005 Edgbaston nail-biter served up another tense finish: Australia, set 423 at Old Trafford, would have sunk without trace but for a superb effort from their captain, Ricky Ponting. Batting almost throughout the final day, he made 156: victory was never really on, but he had all but ensured a draw when he was finally caught behind, ninth out with four overs left. Ponting thought he'd blown it, but the last pair - Brett Lee and Glenn McGrath - made sure his efforts weren't wasted.

George Headley
West Indies faced a unique situation against England in Kingston in April 1930: they needed the little matter of 836 to win. Against an attack including the 52-year-old Wilfred Rhodes - the oldest man to play a Test - they reached 408 for 5, of which the great Headley contributed 223. Headley's fine effort was enough to earn his side a draw, even though the match was supposed to be timeless and played out to a finish come what may: rain washed out the scheduled eighth and ninth days, after which the England team had to leave to catch their boat home.

Peter May
After conceding a first-innings lead of 288 in the first Test in Edgbaston in 1957, England were 113 for 3 when their captain, Peter May, was joined by Colin Cowdrey. The major problem was the mystery spin of the West Indian Sonny Ramadhin, who had taken 7 for 49 in the first innings and two more already in the second. May and Cowdrey decided to treat him as an offspinner and pad the ball away as much as possible: they put on 411 in a day and a half, May scoring 285 not out and Cowdrey 154. Ramadhin toiled through a record 98 overs, appealed himself hoarse, and was never the same threat again. The draw set England up for an eventual 3-0 series victory.

Hanif Mohammad (again)
Nearly ten years after his Bridgetown epic, Hanif was at it again, at Lord's this time, in July 1967. Now captaining a largely inexperienced but promising side, Hanif had to dig deep as Pakistan slipped to 139 for 7 in reply to England's 369. Helped by Asif Iqbal, who scored 76, Hanif hauled his side close to parity, scoring 187 not out from 542 minutes and 556 balls. It lasted deep into the fourth day, and did not allow England enough time to press for the win.

Alastair Cook
It currently seems hard to believe that it was only three years ago that, facing an unpromising position in the first Ashes Test in Brisbane - 221 behind on first innings - England sauntered to 517 for 1, with Cook helping himself to 235 not out and sharing big stands with Andrew Strauss and Jonathan Trott. England saved the match easily, and went on to retain the Ashes. Mitchell Johnson (whatever happened to him?) finished with 0 for 170 in the match, and was dropped for the next game.

Steven Lynch is the editor of the Wisden Guide to International Cricket 2013

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Nerk on December 10, 2013, 17:25 GMT

    Two notable exemptions from Adelaide - Kenny McKay's 62* in 223 minutes against the Windies (with a little help from last man Kline) in 60/61 is the stuff of legend and Faf's last year heroics. Atherton's innings though was brilliant. Cricket is an amazing game. In how many sports is a draw celebrated as much as a win? Cricket is a game of character and mental fortitude unlike any other, because it forces you to keep going even though there is no prospect of a win.

  • on December 11, 2013, 21:55 GMT

    The innings from Dennis Amiss was one if not THE greatest rearguard performance ever....

  • harshthakor on December 11, 2013, 12:50 GMT

    Majid Khan's 167 at Bridgetown that saved a test in 1977 was a classic after Pakistan had a 280 run deficit in the 1st innings.A great exhibition of controlled strokeplay.Another possible inclusion was Wasim Raja's century at Barbados in 1977,Sachin Tendulkar's match-saving century at Old Trafford in 1990 and Kapil Dev's similar effort at the Oval in the final test of the 1982 series in England.

    Alan Border's feats at Trinidad in 1984 are a sure inclusion and close behind are Amarnath's on the same venue a year before ,Majid Khan's 167 at Georgetown in 1977 and Wasim Raja's 117 n.o at Barbados in 1977.

  • on December 11, 2013, 12:38 GMT

    i think the best one in latest times was the innings by Inzimmam against Bangladesh.Pakistan won the match by 1 wicket.

  • harshthakor on December 11, 2013, 10:50 GMT

    @Devadeep Dutta

    No doubt Gavaskar's 221 ranks amongst the best innings of all time but will be remembered for all but winning the game,against all odds.More than save the match he morally won the game for India when dubious umpiring decisions cost India a well -deserved victory.

    I also remember Sandeep Patil's 129 N.O.at Old Trafford in 1982 and 174 at Adelaide in 1980-81. when India was in dire straits which saved both the games.It was marvellous batting from a technical and entertainment point of view.

  • harshthakor on December 11, 2013, 10:44 GMT

    How can one forget Alan Border's herculean batting efforts to save the 2nd test at Trinidad in 1984 against the mighty West Indians when all seemed lost.He literally saved a sinking ship in a storm with the nerves of a great military commander.I will also list Mohinder Amarnath's century that saved the 2n d test at Trinidad in 1983 against the same calypso team displaying dour resistance .

  • on December 11, 2013, 1:54 GMT

    You are missing Faf du Plessis debut inning last yr against Australia.. Has to be one of the best match saving inning ever!

  • on December 10, 2013, 21:10 GMT

    No love for Faf du Plessis last year, or Ken Mackay and Lindsay Kline defying Wes Hall in the Tied Test series?

  • S.Jagernath on December 10, 2013, 20:28 GMT

    @Devadeep Dutta.Sunil Gavaskar's 221 was in a losing cause & VVS Laxman's 281 was in a winning cause,not match saving!

  • on December 10, 2013, 20:09 GMT

    And Pakistan vs India 2004/5 Played at Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Mohali, Chandigarh Kamran Akmal & Abdul Razzaq played a great i innings (109, 71) Pakistan are 200 runs behind in the first innings and they save the game

  • Nerk on December 10, 2013, 17:25 GMT

    Two notable exemptions from Adelaide - Kenny McKay's 62* in 223 minutes against the Windies (with a little help from last man Kline) in 60/61 is the stuff of legend and Faf's last year heroics. Atherton's innings though was brilliant. Cricket is an amazing game. In how many sports is a draw celebrated as much as a win? Cricket is a game of character and mental fortitude unlike any other, because it forces you to keep going even though there is no prospect of a win.

  • on December 11, 2013, 21:55 GMT

    The innings from Dennis Amiss was one if not THE greatest rearguard performance ever....

  • harshthakor on December 11, 2013, 12:50 GMT

    Majid Khan's 167 at Bridgetown that saved a test in 1977 was a classic after Pakistan had a 280 run deficit in the 1st innings.A great exhibition of controlled strokeplay.Another possible inclusion was Wasim Raja's century at Barbados in 1977,Sachin Tendulkar's match-saving century at Old Trafford in 1990 and Kapil Dev's similar effort at the Oval in the final test of the 1982 series in England.

    Alan Border's feats at Trinidad in 1984 are a sure inclusion and close behind are Amarnath's on the same venue a year before ,Majid Khan's 167 at Georgetown in 1977 and Wasim Raja's 117 n.o at Barbados in 1977.

  • on December 11, 2013, 12:38 GMT

    i think the best one in latest times was the innings by Inzimmam against Bangladesh.Pakistan won the match by 1 wicket.

  • harshthakor on December 11, 2013, 10:50 GMT

    @Devadeep Dutta

    No doubt Gavaskar's 221 ranks amongst the best innings of all time but will be remembered for all but winning the game,against all odds.More than save the match he morally won the game for India when dubious umpiring decisions cost India a well -deserved victory.

    I also remember Sandeep Patil's 129 N.O.at Old Trafford in 1982 and 174 at Adelaide in 1980-81. when India was in dire straits which saved both the games.It was marvellous batting from a technical and entertainment point of view.

  • harshthakor on December 11, 2013, 10:44 GMT

    How can one forget Alan Border's herculean batting efforts to save the 2nd test at Trinidad in 1984 against the mighty West Indians when all seemed lost.He literally saved a sinking ship in a storm with the nerves of a great military commander.I will also list Mohinder Amarnath's century that saved the 2n d test at Trinidad in 1983 against the same calypso team displaying dour resistance .

  • on December 11, 2013, 1:54 GMT

    You are missing Faf du Plessis debut inning last yr against Australia.. Has to be one of the best match saving inning ever!

  • on December 10, 2013, 21:10 GMT

    No love for Faf du Plessis last year, or Ken Mackay and Lindsay Kline defying Wes Hall in the Tied Test series?

  • S.Jagernath on December 10, 2013, 20:28 GMT

    @Devadeep Dutta.Sunil Gavaskar's 221 was in a losing cause & VVS Laxman's 281 was in a winning cause,not match saving!

  • on December 10, 2013, 20:09 GMT

    And Pakistan vs India 2004/5 Played at Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Mohali, Chandigarh Kamran Akmal & Abdul Razzaq played a great i innings (109, 71) Pakistan are 200 runs behind in the first innings and they save the game

  • on December 10, 2013, 18:02 GMT

    Sunil Gavaskar's 221 @ The Oval in 1979?

  • Semoli on December 10, 2013, 15:36 GMT

    Gautham gambirs match saving innings!!, who were the bowlers again. No offence meant to NZ, Gambir would have found his name here if it was achieved against a very good bowling attack.

  • on December 10, 2013, 15:21 GMT

    what about mark greatbatch and martin sneddens epic on the final day at the waca?

  • crktcrzy on December 10, 2013, 15:18 GMT

    One notable omission is Saleem Malik's 237 against Australia in '94-95, acknowledged by Wisden as one of the top 20 innings of the century

  • on December 10, 2013, 14:16 GMT

    The 2 knocks that deserved to be in there are Gautam Gambhir's 137 against New Zealand and Faf du Plessis' ton against Australia last year.

  • Enthusiast_Cricket on December 10, 2013, 13:33 GMT

    //and where is the description of VVS Laxman's 281* inning against Australia while playing follow on...........

    VVS Laxman's Innings was a match winning innings. The ones listed here are match saving innings.

  • on December 10, 2013, 13:05 GMT

    and where is the description of VVS Laxman's 281* inning against Australia while playing follow on...........

  • M.Usman-Sharif on December 10, 2013, 13:04 GMT

    Why no such article praises Faf's innings? That awesome inning was not even selected in top test innings of last year by cricinfo.

  • on December 10, 2013, 10:16 GMT

    Gambhir's second innings in Napier-2008-09, 137 off 437 balls and 643 minutes, saving India following on with a deficit of 314 on a weary track, worth a mention.

  • WarVdm on December 10, 2013, 9:41 GMT

    Faf against Australia in Adelaide last year!! (which helped win the series!) Rudolph (and Kemp) against Warne, McGrath and Lee in Perth 2005; Williamson vs Steyn, Morkel, Philander and De Lange (wow!) in 2012; Collingwood`s efforts in Cape Town and Pretoria 2009-2010.

  • Thuram3 on December 10, 2013, 7:03 GMT

    Faf's knock in Adelaide was also pretty impressive...

  • Romanticstud on December 10, 2013, 6:55 GMT

    What about the test in England where England were set 369 to avoid defeat and managed to get that when time ran out against South Africa ...

  • Mischief...managed on December 10, 2013, 5:25 GMT

    I must say that Gautam Gambhir's 643 minute match saving 137 deserved to be in the list, and so does faf's innings against Australia. Both were masterclass innings in some of the toughest match situations.

  • on December 10, 2013, 2:56 GMT

    Mahela J against England in 2006......

  • on December 10, 2013, 2:48 GMT

    What about faf the innings he played against Australia

  • NXT_Gen on December 10, 2013, 2:19 GMT

    I doubt how Steve did miss the epic innings of Faf du Plessis!. Really i'm afraid that still there are many critics who boast about 1960-1990s and not consider about recent years. Actually i did know that batting was very tough to play in that era against quality attacks. But I feel Faf needs a immense credit cause it was his debut match and to hold it on for more than 1 1/2 day with already 5 down against Aussies in Australia. He emerged to cricketing scene with potential of limited overs player, but boy he did salvage that draw from nowhere. If you closely looking current ashes you would know how tough is to play-out a draw against quality pace attack of Aus.

  • on December 10, 2013, 0:55 GMT

    Mark Waugh's innings against Australia in 97 against was also a worthy one. Admitedly, it was amid controversy when he hit the stumps with his bat. I have had mixed reactions as to whether the right decision was made to give him not out but it was the only time really in his career that Mark Waugh actually played an innings to save the match for Australia. He was involved in a lot of those last innnings collapses with australia chasing low totals to win. Mark Waugh usually played a rash shot to get out. Story of his career really lol

  • on December 9, 2013, 22:13 GMT

    What about Nathan Astle/Danny Morrison in Auckland, 1996-97 vs. England? When Morrison came in NZ were effectively 11-9 and he was the world record holder for most ducks. The two batted out the match, adding 106, to save the game. This was Morrison's last game, he was ironically dropped for not bowling well enough.

  • mk49_van on December 9, 2013, 20:06 GMT

    Hey - What about Sunny's 221 at the Oval '79 against the top-class attack of Botham, Willis and Hendrick? He helped India nearly chase down 430 or so and had it happened it would been one of the greatest innings of all time -likely a Wisden top 10 or 20. But it could also be seen as a great (and aggressive) match saving innings - certainly ahead of some of those mentioned here.

  • on December 9, 2013, 19:51 GMT

    How about Faf's nock against aus last year. Or Jaques Rudolph's resistance against aus on the last when he faced the first and last ball of the day with no less than a certain Warne McGrath and lee http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/226371.html? Gary kirtsten batted 878 minutes against england: http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/63862.html J Kallis first centurty batted all day against warne and mcgrath http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/63778.html

    Not one Sa player mention?

  • on December 9, 2013, 19:14 GMT

    Both Faf and Gary Kirsten deserve a mention here... both affected the oppositions bowling to such an extent that it helped record victories in the following Tests.

  • regofpicton on December 9, 2013, 19:02 GMT

    It doesn't have to be a 4th innings to earn a draw. The 10th wicket stand between Hastings and Collinge against Pakistan in Auckland in 1973 shouldn't be forgotten. When they came together we hadn't avoided the (150 run) follow-on. When Hastings was bowled for 110, leaving Collinge on 68, the scores were level. The partnership of 151, in 155 minutes, was then the world record for the 10th wicket. The match had another interesting feature - it was, somewhat bizarrely, Rodney Redmond's only test, leaving him with an average of 81.5

    They saved the test but unfortunately not the series, which was lost 1-0.

    Here we are celebrating games without a result, to the utter confusion of people who don't love the game. Isn't this great. Cricket lovely cricket

  • on December 9, 2013, 18:41 GMT

    Mark Greatbatch's heroics in Perth should have definitely have squeezed in there somewhere - perhaps in place of Alastair Cook, who faced nowhere near the same challenges that Greatbatch did.

  • on December 9, 2013, 15:30 GMT

    Well played Darren Bravo and Shane Shillingford too, but I think it was the rain that ultimately saved the West Indies. To indianpunter I would say it doesn't matter. People aren't saying "you should have included this", but "I would have included this" which is not the same at all. I certainly would have included Auckland 1997 as Mr Harcourt has, although it was helped by some inexplicable defensive field setting by the England captain. In the same category as Hanif I would put Sunil Gavaskar's double century at the Oval in 1979 in one of the greatest tests ever, which was drawn, but India very nearly won.

  • KaptaanCricket on December 9, 2013, 15:11 GMT

    Faf Du Plessis epic innings vs Australia in Adelaide just recently deserves a mention.

  • Fan1969 on December 9, 2013, 15:06 GMT

    In recent times I recall Faf du Plessis amazing knock vs Aus and Prior saving England from defeat against NZ in NZ were notable. Faf career took off after that knock and he has been an integral part of the SA team.

    Gambhir was compared to Gavaskar after Napier in 2009.

    Anyway the article says "some" match saving innings so we can all add to the list rather than criticize.

  • on December 9, 2013, 14:27 GMT

    I'd have included some classic #11 rearguards here, such as Danny Morrison against England and the Monty/Onions show in the 2009 Ashes.

  • J751 on December 9, 2013, 13:43 GMT

    Mike Gatting scored 150 not out in the England second innings at the Oval against Pakistan in 1987 to save the game.Pakistan had scored over 700 in their only innings and England had been dismissed cheaply in their first innings.

  • indianpunter on December 9, 2013, 13:16 GMT

    It never ceases to amaze me that the comments to these compiled lists are always full of " where is such and such person". This is never meant to be an exhaustive list, and mentions noteworthy performances as deemed fit by the author, who is quite knowledgeable himself. To those posters who talk about Laxman's 281 and Lara's 153,; they miss the point completely. The list is about "draws", not wins.

  • on December 9, 2013, 13:14 GMT

    No Mark Greatbatch and Martin Snedden at Perth, 1989-90? Greatbatch's was one of the greatest rearguard innings of all time. 10 hrs 55 he batted for his 146*, and 3 hrs 20 for 70-odd in the first innings. Shocking that a great innings played against us Kiwis did not get our great Kiwi an acknowledgement as well! Still, good article :)

  • fahed_aamer on December 9, 2013, 12:59 GMT

    how about kamran Akmal and Abdul Razzak in India? They batted almost 4 sessions to save the test for Pakistan against India

  • gsingh7 on December 9, 2013, 12:52 GMT

    where is gambhir 's innings when he batted for 2 days to save the test single handedly on green tracks of nz??

  • on December 9, 2013, 11:47 GMT

    @iam28sid, wat about Gautam Gambhirs 100 where he batted for almost 2 days against New Zealand in New Zealand

  • Selassie-I on December 9, 2013, 11:40 GMT

    Surely one of Paul Collingwood's many epics deserved a mention here!

  • J751 on December 9, 2013, 11:38 GMT

    Imran Khan and Waseem Akram rescued Pakistan from a very difficult situation in Adelaide in 1989-90.Both scored fighting hundreds in an epic partnership and saved the game for Pakistan.Also, in the Mohali Test of 2005,Abdul Razzaq and Kamran Akmal were able to secure a draw from a precarious position.

  • on December 9, 2013, 11:03 GMT

    @Kamran Ali Haider ... good identification of Malik's inning... it was also significant, because that draw gave Pakistan the chance to achieve the rare series victory in Sri Lanka, which they got courtesy brilliant bowling by Mohammad Asif

  • on December 9, 2013, 10:22 GMT

    Surely this list is defective with no mention of Mackay and Kline from Adelaide 1961.

  • on December 9, 2013, 10:14 GMT

    Gautam Gambhi in New Zealand against New Zealand?

  • on December 9, 2013, 10:06 GMT

    I'm usually the last one to single out the achievements of Indian batsmen, but surely Gautam Gambhir's (a player I'm not too fond of, to be honest) 643-minute match-saving effort in Napier in 2009 deserves a mention here. With India facing the barrel, more than 300 runs behind following on and 2 days left in the game, it was one of the few magnificent defensive efforts I've seen by an Indian batsmen outside India.

    That being said, those Hanif Mohammed epics are a different class altogether.

  • on December 9, 2013, 10:03 GMT

    What about Gautam Gambhir's epic innings in March 2009 against NZ in Napier ? Gautam Gambhir batted nearly 11 hours for 137 to save a match & also a series win in NZ.

  • on December 9, 2013, 10:03 GMT

    Lara's 153* definitely up there.

  • on December 9, 2013, 9:37 GMT

    why no vvs laxman here , his 281 vs AUS

  • on December 9, 2013, 9:26 GMT

    Gower 154* v WI, 1980/81; Gatting 150 v PAK, 1987; Du Plessis 110* v AUS 2012.

  • on December 9, 2013, 9:20 GMT

    Hanif Muhammad the Gr8, The true Little master...

  • on December 9, 2013, 7:49 GMT

    @humdrum, I agree with you. The only cricket teams which play test cricket are AUS, ENG, SA and not IND. Even if you dig out the stats and find some extraordinary innings by an Indian, it wont be mentioned here lol..

  • Bilal_Choudry on December 9, 2013, 7:31 GMT

    Salim Malik's 237 in Rawalpindi vs Australia in 94/95 while following on

  • highveldhillbilly on December 9, 2013, 7:26 GMT

    What about Faf earlier this year?

  • on December 9, 2013, 7:10 GMT

    How could you leave Greatbatch out ???????

  • on December 9, 2013, 6:26 GMT

    Shoaib Malik's epic last day batting against Sri Lanka in Sri Lanka against the bowling attack of Murali and Co. needed to be mentioned too.

  • Mahooch on December 9, 2013, 6:09 GMT

    Martin Crowe scored 299 vs. Sri Lanka (http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/63549.html) in January 1991 to save the game

  • TATTUs on December 9, 2013, 5:39 GMT

    What about Gavaskar? 221 at the Oval? Dilip Sardesai 200 albeit in the 3rd innings was an excellent innings.

  • humdrum on December 9, 2013, 5:36 GMT

    The only possible reason for Gambhir's innings to be 'not relevant' would be that it was played,as all of India's matches are,in a meaningless series.You see,only the matches in which Aus, Eng and SA play each other are meaningful,even if it's only a silly T-20 game.

  • Scuderi on December 9, 2013, 5:31 GMT

    Its not a test match, but Jamie Siddons making 4 runs of 134 balls is the 1995-96 sheffield shield final to help ensure a draw and secure the shield is may favourite.

  • on December 9, 2013, 5:24 GMT

    I think gambhir's innings was not mentioned because it was made against a New Zealand team which was not quite the best of teams going around...but the fact that it was made in an away test much,in conditions far from similar to the one's seen in India,it deserved it's place...he batted for 436 balls to save that test match for his team...

  • on December 9, 2013, 5:24 GMT

    other misses in recent times(say in last 10 yrs)......150 odd scored by Kevin Peterson in the last test of 2005 ashes; Gambhir's 200 odd against NZL in NZL 2009

  • on December 9, 2013, 5:19 GMT

    Davin Smith - what road r u talking about. Bounce was inconsistent, ball was spinning sharply and also reversing. By now means was it easy whether u are facing a spinner or a fast bowler. Look at a lll the 300+ chases, apart from the Indian one in chennai, there hasn't been a 300+ chase in a subcontinental ground. Reason subcontinent pitches break down a lot quicker than ones in Australia, England and SA, making batting tougher at day 5.

  • on December 9, 2013, 5:07 GMT

    Mark Greatbatch! Perth 1989!

  • on December 9, 2013, 5:07 GMT

    Saleem Malik...http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/63655.html...

  • WalkingWicket11 on December 9, 2013, 4:47 GMT

    @Davin Smith Why is Gambhir's innings "not even relevant"?

  • on December 9, 2013, 4:25 GMT

    Sachin's 110 vs England in old trafford should be here...

  • on December 9, 2013, 4:16 GMT

    Gambhir at Napier should have mentioned.

  • on December 9, 2013, 4:12 GMT

    Some more I can think of immediately... Ffaf du Plessis in Adelaide, Gautam Gambhir and Dwayne Bravo in New Zealand. Gauti, specially, was one hell of a rearguard.

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:49 GMT

    The premise of the article was to force a draw...As India won the the magic of VVS Laxman and Rahul Dravid; Gautam Gambhir or Gavaskar is not really relevant ...Fafs innings was great but played against an Australia attack one down (Pattisonlimped off in the first innings) and on a road at Adelaide.

  • jimmy787 on December 9, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    Faf du Plessis's effort in Adelaide??

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    reason why VVS and Dravid are not mentioned because this is a list of games that ended in draw, not wins.

  • ThePieChucker on December 9, 2013, 3:38 GMT

    @Matt Marahaere: This article is about match-saving innings, those that have resulted in a draw (as the title clearly points out), not match-winning innings. That's why VVS Laxman and Rahul Dravid are not mentioned here.

  • Mr.Lock on December 9, 2013, 3:32 GMT

    Hanif. The greatest rearguard of all time. It is appropriate that he is on top of this list. Good job Steve, great article

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:31 GMT

    Mark Greatbatch at Perth in 1989?

  • kirands on December 9, 2013, 3:24 GMT

    Thank you for this article on fantastic rearguard innings. A couple of equally memorable performances come to mind: a. Last year Faf Du Plessis defied Australia for 376 deliveries and batted 1 1/2 days to save the Adelaide Test, thus paving the way for their series win in Perth. b. Sunil Gavaskar's unforgettable 221 in the 1979 Oval Test against England which turned near certain defeat to a victory --- well almost, since India ended their chase of 438 by reaching 429 for 8 and could not complete the win. c. Gautam Gambhir's marathon knock of 137 in 643 minutes off 436 deliveries which saved India from certain defeat at Napier against New Zealand in 2009.

  • Bishop on December 9, 2013, 3:22 GMT

    What? No Mark Greatbatch?

  • 4test90 on December 9, 2013, 3:18 GMT

    As an Aussie (and altough it came at our expense) I have to nominate Mark Greatbatch of NZ for batting 11 hours at Perth in 1989. NZ trailed by close to 300 on 1st inns and fell to 2/11 in the 2nd. It was a performance of immense concentration and ability.

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:16 GMT

    no Gambhir at Napier and Laxman at Kolkatta?

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:15 GMT

    WHOA - someone must be sniffing too mnuch linseed. How is VVS Laxman and Rahul Dravid not even mentioned here? Perhaps one of the best Test matches ever. More recently, Faf DuPlesis innings was mammoth!

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:15 GMT

    WHOA - someone must be sniffing too mnuch linseed. How is VVS Laxman and Rahul Dravid not even mentioned here? Perhaps one of the best Test matches ever. More recently, Faf DuPlesis innings was mammoth!

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:16 GMT

    no Gambhir at Napier and Laxman at Kolkatta?

  • 4test90 on December 9, 2013, 3:18 GMT

    As an Aussie (and altough it came at our expense) I have to nominate Mark Greatbatch of NZ for batting 11 hours at Perth in 1989. NZ trailed by close to 300 on 1st inns and fell to 2/11 in the 2nd. It was a performance of immense concentration and ability.

  • Bishop on December 9, 2013, 3:22 GMT

    What? No Mark Greatbatch?

  • kirands on December 9, 2013, 3:24 GMT

    Thank you for this article on fantastic rearguard innings. A couple of equally memorable performances come to mind: a. Last year Faf Du Plessis defied Australia for 376 deliveries and batted 1 1/2 days to save the Adelaide Test, thus paving the way for their series win in Perth. b. Sunil Gavaskar's unforgettable 221 in the 1979 Oval Test against England which turned near certain defeat to a victory --- well almost, since India ended their chase of 438 by reaching 429 for 8 and could not complete the win. c. Gautam Gambhir's marathon knock of 137 in 643 minutes off 436 deliveries which saved India from certain defeat at Napier against New Zealand in 2009.

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:31 GMT

    Mark Greatbatch at Perth in 1989?

  • Mr.Lock on December 9, 2013, 3:32 GMT

    Hanif. The greatest rearguard of all time. It is appropriate that he is on top of this list. Good job Steve, great article

  • ThePieChucker on December 9, 2013, 3:38 GMT

    @Matt Marahaere: This article is about match-saving innings, those that have resulted in a draw (as the title clearly points out), not match-winning innings. That's why VVS Laxman and Rahul Dravid are not mentioned here.

  • on December 9, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    reason why VVS and Dravid are not mentioned because this is a list of games that ended in draw, not wins.

  • jimmy787 on December 9, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    Faf du Plessis's effort in Adelaide??