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1982

The end of the line for Boycott

Geoff Boycott largely chose the time and nature of his quitting Test cricket but ruffled feathers in the process

Martin Williamson

February 15, 2014

Comments: 17 | Text size: A | A

Ian Botham and Geoffrey Boycott at the England Christmas party in India.  Botham came dressed as Boycott, who had just broken the record for Test runs by an England player, December 1981
At England's traditional Christmas party on tour in India in 1981-82, Ian Botham came dressed as Boycott, who had just broken Garry Sobers' record for most Test runs © Getty Images
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British left-wing politician Tony Benn once said that all political careers end in failure. While it would be unfair to say all sporting careers follow the same path, more sportsmen bow out with a whimper than a bang. And some, as with Kevin Pietersen's time with England, finish with a resounding raspberry.

In the reams of copy discussing whether Pietersen was a misunderstood genius or a talented pain in the arse, several writers made comparisons with Geoff Boycott. Both polarised opinion, had the ability to change matches, and could try the patience of a saint. They racked up more than a century of Test appearances but finished amid the kind of controversy that dogged their careers.

The difference is that while Pietersen had the choice made for him by weary selectors and, so it seems, team-mates, Boycott largely chose the time and nature of his going.

By the time England headed to India in 1981-82, Boycott, by now 41, had been an ever-present in the Test side since his return from self-imposed exile in 1977. In 41 Tests since his comeback he had averaged 48.10 (almost identical to his record before he turned his back on England) and he was still a dependable rock at the top of the innings. A hundred at The Oval at the end of the famous 1981 Ashes series ended chat that he might miss out on that winter's tour.

Boycott had never toured India before because of unease about the effect it would have on his health, a genuine concern given he had had his spleen removed as a child and so was more prone to infection. But he had been reassured by a ten-day stop to play the Jubilee Test in Bombay in early 1980, although he later admitted he had not understood conditions outside the major cities were still, at that time, variable.

It was a long and gruelling trip and one which only started after weeks of politicking. The Indian government objected to the presence in the England squad of Boycott and Nick Cook as they had played in South Africa. Only when both condemned apartheid did the government acquiesce but neither was asked for a commitment they would not play in South Africa again. When the squad left for India on November 4, Boycott was the one absentee; he flew straight to Bombay from a holiday in Hong Kong.

England went behind in the first Test of the six-match series and thereafter the matches were endlessly defensive and played against a backdrop of desperate over rates. Boycott's form in the Tests was good. Fifties in the first two matches was followed by his 22nd and final England hundred, in Delhi, during which he passed Garry Sobers' record aggregate of Test runs.

Shortly before Christmas stories emerged of a row with Keith Fletcher, the captain, after a newspaper report claimed he had told Boycott he needed to score more quickly. Boycott demanded - and got - an apology as he maintained no such conversation had taken place.


News breaks of the 1982 England rebel tour of South Africa, February 28, 1982
The storm breaks © Daily Express
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By the time the squad reached Calcutta for the fourth Test Boycott's health was poor; he had been worn down by tiredness, the food and ongoing reports that he was about to be fired as Yorkshire's captain. A sign of how bad he was came when he only netted for a few minutes; usually he was there for hours.

He was barely eating and suffering from diarrhoea throughout the Test. Unsurprisingly, he was out of sorts with the bat scoring 18 and 6 and he spent most of the game back in the hotel.

Bernard Thomas, the England physio, advised him to get some air and so Boycott went off to a local golf course, one place he believed that he could get some peace as on the streets he was so well known he would have been mobbed. "The suggestion that I went out and played a round of golf creates visions of Boycott striding out, marking a card, oblivious to his team-mates or his responsibilities," he wrote. "I walked a few holes [and] knocked a golf ball for the exercise, sitting down when I felt wearied."

However, he admitted it was a "misguided and foolish thing to do in the circumstances but there was nothing underhand or uncaring about it". Inevitably, it did not play out well when the story emerged in the press or with team-mates.

Raman Subba Row, the manager, and Boycott had not seen eye to eye throughout the tour and when he heard about the golf he summoned him to a meeting with Fletcher and his vice-captain Bob Willis. It ended with an unhappy Boycott agreeing to apologise to Subba Row and the players - and also with him deciding to quit the tour.

As with so many parts of this story, Ian Botham had a quite different recollection. After the golf escapade he said the squad "grabbed the nearest piece of paper they could find to get him to sign a resignation note before he had time to change his mind".

The following morning Fletcher and Subba Row reiterated they believed Boycott should go home and by the end of the day he was on a flight to London with Subba Row telling the media that "continuing ill health" was the reason. Without a doubt the trip was a hard slog, especially for a 41-year-old however fit. Days after Boycott quit, the seemingly indefatigable Botham was on the sick list.

For most reporters Boycott's early departure was the end of his Test career. When news broke on February 28 that along with 12 others - including four other members of the tour party to India in Graham Gooch, John Emburey, John Lever and Derek Underwood - Boycott was on his way to play in a rebel series in South Africa that become a certainty. The press lost no time in labelling the rebels "Boycott's Dirty Dozen"

Whether Boycott was the man who put the whole series together, the one who turned the heads of other players and the one who in effect stuck two fingers up at the establishment is unclear. He maintains he was not alone. Botham - again - claimed "throughout the trip [he] had been busy trying to recruit players".

The idea of a sanction-breaking South Africa trip first surfaced on the West Indies tour the previous winter and by the time Fletcher's side reached India most players knew about it and had expressed interest. The likes of Willis, Botham, Emburey and Graham Dilley and David Gower had been toying with idea of going for months. It is possible that the only senior figures who did not know were Fletcher and the management.

Boycott was clearly the conduit for negotiations with the organisers during the tour - he admits that a meeting was held in Willis' room days after arriving in India to discuss the financial package.

Gooch later described how there had been clandestine meetings, deviousness and "almost deception". Boycott, he said, devised a chess code to summon together those signed up to the tour to meet - "Castles and knights to meet in the bishop's room".


Geoff Boycott and Graham Gooch lead the England rebels onto the field, South Africa, March 6, 1982
Boycott and Graham Gooch lead the England rebels out on to the field in South Africa © Wisden Cricket Monthly
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Fletcher was kept in the dark "because 'he may well have felt obliged to honour the moral terms of his position and report the matter". At one point Subba Row got wind of something in the air and asked several players if they knew anything. They denied it. "But what else could we do?" Gooch shrugged.

By the time Boycott left India on January 7 the whole rebel series was off. Botham withdrew during the Bangalore Test in December and said "good old Geoffrey blew his top" when he found out. When Gower followed suit the organisers, bereft of box-office names, withdrew their offer. Later in the month Gooch agreed to go - the young draw the series needed - and the organisers sprung back into life.

Boycott was kept fully aware of what was happening and continued to speak to all parties involved. A tabloid newspaper ran a report saying he was heading to South Africa to organise and play on a tour. Donald Carr from the England board challenged him, but Boycott, arguing he believed the tour was off, said that was untrue. "I was not lying as I believed it was dead and buried."

Boycott has always claimed he only threw in his lot at the last minute after two more withdrawals - including Willis - in the days before the side secretly flew to South Africa. There was a real possibility he would be sacked by Yorkshire and approaches to the England board over his international future had drawn blanks. "I came to the conclusion that I had no choice and very little to lose." And so he went.

Perhaps because he was such a well-known and controversial figure, the tabloid coverage centred on Boycott. "We did not expect a round of applause," he said, "but neither did we expect national hysteria."

On March 31 the rebels returned with the media attention again on Boycott who, claimed the Daily Mirror, had argued with his team-mates after taking one of the four first-class tickets on offer for his girlfriend. At Heathrow he was met by a posse of tabloid reporters and photographers.

Wearing a baseball hat pulled down to cover his face, he told the photographers: "You look like a bunch of rats." One replied: "We don't look as silly as you do."

What happened next?

  • On March 19, 1982 the Test and County Cricket Board voted to ban the rebels for three years. That confirmed the end of Boycott's Test career. The decision was expected by all concerned as the previous summer the TCCB had sent a letter warning all English players of the consequences if they undertook such a venture.
  • Boycott was sacked by Yorkshire at the end of 1983, but was reinstated following a campaign by his supporters. He was again sacked by the committee at the end of the 1986 season and despite an offer to play for Derbyshire, he retired.
  • Gooch and Emburey played for England again after their bans; Emburey again toured South Africa with Mike Gatting's rebel side in 1990 and received another three-year ban.



Bibliography
My Autobiography - Don't Tell Kath by Ian Botham (Collins Willow 1994)
The Autobiography by Geoffrey Boycott (Macmillan 1987)
Wisden Cricketers' Almanack

Martin Williamson is executive editor of ESPNcricinfo and managing editor of ESPN Digital Media in Europe, the Middle East and Africa

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Posted by   on (February 20, 2014, 9:53 GMT)

Guess there have always been mercenaries. Frankly I didn't know about Boycott's tour of SA during the apartheid years before reading this. And he has been on record asking Eng players not to play in the IPL. Frankly, financial considerations will always be front and center. Back then it was the SA series, Kerry packer et al and now its the IPL. Labels change but in substance its the $ that speaks.

Posted by shillingsworth on (February 16, 2014, 17:23 GMT)

Enoch Powell, not Tony Benn coined the phrase about political careers ending in failure. An excellent and comprehensive article though.

Posted by   on (February 16, 2014, 12:00 GMT)

Ian did it for Viv...he realized the repercussions. Good. I salute Sir Ian for that.

Posted by Jonathan_E on (February 16, 2014, 2:12 GMT)

Gooch and Emburey were not the only English players to play again after their bans on the first rebel tour - John Lever also returned for a single Test (Headingley 1986, against India), as a replacement in an injury-hit bowling attack. He bowled poorly in the first innings, well (4/62) in the second, scored a pair, and England lost heavily on a pitch which pretty much broke up after the first day. He was dropped and never played at international level again.

Emburey remains the only person to have come back and played after being banned for BOTH rebel tours.

Posted by Biggus on (February 16, 2014, 2:00 GMT)

Boycott's the sort of player you get rid of as soon as you can do without him. Nobody liked him, not even his team mates, and he didn't care less whether they did. If anything it would have led him to do more of those things he knew annoyed them. Better as a commentator although he remembers himself as far less selfish and a man of the people. Go figure! Could bat a bit though, a real pain to get out when he was set.

Posted by Ryan_H on (February 16, 2014, 1:59 GMT)

Martin Williamson pretty much always has interesting articles. I enjoy his style of narration.

Posted by TenDonebyaShooter on (February 15, 2014, 21:19 GMT)

Spot on Rob Widdis. Hard to imagine any circumstances in which India would object to playing against Nick Cook

Posted by   on (February 15, 2014, 20:23 GMT)

Interesting take on this. Whatever Botham may say on this, I believe he was told he would earn more as an England player than from the tour so pulled out. The odder thing is the approach of the TCCB (the precursor to the ECB). Ten years previously (1970) they had done everything in their power to put on a tour by apartheid South Africa (no reflection on the team). So their attitude to this tour (though right) was a touch hypocritical.

Posted by   on (February 15, 2014, 19:16 GMT)

good article, and an interesting story

Posted by Insightful2013 on (February 15, 2014, 19:06 GMT)

Most successful people have strong egos. There are many detractors and naysayers, so to overcome them you must have self belief. People like Boycott and KP and the ECB panel have such, strong egos. What you need are Clive Lloyds and Brearleys who understand people and aren't easily upset or swayed by strong egos. The ECB are selfish blokes. It's an English thing. Because we are so repressed we are uncomfortable around expression. The ECB are also insecure. We would rather die of comportment, than appear improper. That is the motivation for the ECB. KP is improper and conveys the wrong message to the world. Not once would they consider, it may possibly be themselves. Ego you see, is manifested by obdurate self centredness amongst successful people. Their thinking got them to this position in life so why question it, especially to everyone non English, whose opinions and mendacity are questionable. We are superior so logically everyone else is inferior. Yeah!

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Martin WilliamsonClose
Martin Williamson Executive editor Martin Williamson joined the Wisden website in its planning stages in 2001 after failing to make his millions in the internet boom when managing editor of Sportal. Before that he was in charge of Sky Sports Online and helped launch and run Sky News Online. With a preference for all things old (except his wife and children), he has recently confounded colleagues by displaying an uncharacteristic fondness for Twenty20 cricket. His enthusiasm for the game is sadly not matched by his ability, but he remains convinced that he might be a late developer and perseveres in the hope of an England call-up with his middle-order batting and non-spinning offbreaks. He is now managing editor of ESPN EMEA Digital Group as well as his Cricinfo responsibilities.

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