May 5, 2014

The others

Cricketers who were overshadowed by their more famous relatives on the field
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When Jimmy Ormond made his Test debut for England against Australia at The Oval in 2001, he was welcomed to the big league by Mark Waugh, who generously informed him that he was nowhere near good enough for Test cricket. Ormond's spirited reply was: "Maybe, but at least I'm the best cricketer in my family." So here's a look at some other international players who were outshone by members of the family circle.

EM Grace
When we look back now at cricket's era of Dr Grace, in the late 19th century, we could easily be paying tribute to EM Grace, "The Coroner", who pulled off all-round feats like - for MCC against Kent in 1862 - carrying his bat for 192 then taking all ten wickets. But EM had to contend with the huge shadow of WG, his even more talented brother, whose bearded face (EM affected only a pair of impressive mutton-chop sideburns) was probably the most famous in the land, apart possibly from Queen Victoria herself.

John Benaud
Almost a decade after Richie Benaud retired following a glittering playing career, his brother John played a few Tests - watched by the omnipresent Richie in the commentary box. Benaud (J) probably missed the 1972 tour of England after getting out for 99 in an unofficial Test against the World XI the previous winter, then in 1972-73 learned he'd been dropped for the third Test against Pakistan before the second one had finished. One imagines that bottom lip jutting, Richie-style, as John hammered 142 in the second innings to embarrass the selectors. Still, he would win only one more cap.

Chris Cowdrey
It was always going to be hard to follow the legendarily nice Colin Cowdrey, who won 114 caps for England over two decades. Chris Cowdrey did pretty well, leading Kent with verve and, in India in 1984-85, making a valiant attempt to fill the Ian Botham role after Beefy took the winter off. Cowdrey managed only four expensive wickets and a highest score of 38, which might have been it - but for a recall as captain in 1988 against West Indies at their most ferocious. Peter May, his godfather, was the chairman of selectors who chose him - and who seemed slightly relieved when, after making 0 and 5, Chris was ruled out of the next Test with an injured foot. He never played for England again.

Peter Pollock
It says a lot for the rest of the family that Peter Pollock, a ferocious fast bowler in his pomp, took 116 Test wickets at 24 - yet he is not only rated well below his brother Graeme, the peerless left-hander who averaged 60 in Tests, but his son too. Shaun Pollock sailed past 400 wickets at an even lower cost, although he admittedly had far more opportunities than his dad.

Ron Headley
George "Atlas" Headley was the first great West Indian batsman. His son, left-hander Ron, was a fine opener too, although his best days were largely confined to the County Championship, after he qualified to play for Worcestershire. He might have opened in Tests with Conrad Hunte throughout the 1960s, but West Indies didn't pick county players back then: still, Ron did get his brief moment in the sun - two Test caps - when he was called up for West Indies' 1973 tour of England. Later his own son, Dean, made the Headleys the first three-generation Test family when he played for England.

Merv Harvey
The Harveys of Fitzroy were a fine sporting family. Four of the six brothers played in the Sheffield Shield, and the boys won 80 Test caps between them. Of those, 79 belonged to Neil, the light-footed left-hander who finished up with 6149 runs and was arguably the best batsman in the world in the 1950s. The other one went to Merv, who opened with Arthur Morris in the fourth Test of the 1946-47 Ashes series (as Sid Barnes was unfit), scored 12 and 31... and never played again.

Grant Flower
He's his country's most-capped player, with 67 Tests, and his six centuries included a double against Pakistan in Zimbabwe's first Test victory. And yet it was Grant Flower's lot to be generally overshadowed by his older brother Andy, who made twice as many tons and averaged nearly double (51 to 29) despite often keeping wicket and captaining too.

Barry Hadlee
A batsman like his Test-playing father Walter, Barry Hadlee joined two of his brothers in the New Zealand side in 1975, playing two one-day internationals, one of them in the World Cup. Richard Hadlee went on to great things, finishing with 431 Test wickets, and Dayle took 71 himself. But that was it for Barry. It must have been a pretty competitive family: small wonder that Christopher, the youngest brother, kept away from cricket (he was a handy tennis player, though, and an architecture graduate). Father Walter blamed himself: "Unwittingly I left him to be a target for his older brothers, who aspired to be fast bowlers."

Trevor Chappell
He didn't play much for Australia - just three Tests, compared to brother Ian's 75 and Greg's 87. Trevor Chappell's Tests all came in the 1981 "Botham's Ashes" series, one most Australians now prefer to forget. And they tend to gloss over the biggest talking point in Trevor's 20 one-day international appearances too - his delivery of the underarm ball at the MCG in 1980-81, which denied New Zealand the chance of hitting the final ball for six to tie the game. It wasn't really Trevor's fault: his brother (Greg) told him to do it.

Rohan Gavaskar
Before Tendulkar, there was another short, dapper batsman who broke records for India. And Sunil Gavaskar did it all from the top of the order, reserving his best for the then-mighty West Indies, against whom he averaged 65 and made 13 of his 34 Test centuries. His son, who was named after Rohan Kanhai, had a fine career himself for Bengal - but although he played 11 one-day internationals in 2004, scoring 54 against Zimbabwe in one of them, he never cracked the Test side.

The Akmals
This is a tough one: no other family has produced three Test wicketkeepers, and it's hard to rank the Akmal clan. Kamran, the oldest, has outdone all Pakistan's other keepers in the run department, but his occasional outbreaks of ham-fisted keeping still produce nightmares from Peshawar to 'Pindi. Umar is a fine - if impetuous - batsman, and a useful stand-in stumper. Adnan Akmal is probably the best pure wicketkeeper of the trio, and is no mug with the bat. So maybe there's a fourth brother at home, who could never get his turn behind the stumps?

This topic started as a thread on the Ask Steven Facebook page, so thanks to everyone who contributed on there. I've tried not to be rude, since I admire anyone who was good enough to play for their country a Test match, because neither I nor my brother got very close to doing so. And it could have been worse. Imagine if Don Bradman had had a brother...

Steven Lynch is the editor of the Wisden Guide to International Cricket 2014

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • NK67 on May 5, 2014, 18:47 GMT

    Chris Smith & Robin Smith. Chris, an opening bat suffered the dubious distinction of being out 1st ball on his debut v NZ 1983. I was there for the 2nd innings & thankfully got off the mark quickly going on to make 40 odd. Robin made his debut in 1988 v WI & enjoyed a longer International career.

  • on May 7, 2014, 14:43 GMT

    What about Ian Botham's son Liam, did play for Hampshire.

  • crktcrzy on May 7, 2014, 2:46 GMT

    I believe Majid Khan & Jehangur Khan were worth a mention- also Mudassar Nazar and his father

  • mshyder on May 7, 2014, 1:26 GMT

    We can add the Mohammed & Rana families from Pakistan alongwith the Miandad and Raja brothers (their third brother Zaeem played 1st class cricket for some time). Then what about Viv Richards & Ian Botham's sons.

  • on May 7, 2014, 1:06 GMT

    Shane LEE? Al-rounder who could have played for any other country but Australia

  • NK67 on May 6, 2014, 22:01 GMT

    Mike & Steve Gatting. They both started off at Middx but Steve's career never went beyond 2nd XI cricket. Instead he made his name as as footballer with Arsenal, Brighton, & Charlton. Steve's son, Joe, started off as a footballer for Brighton before switching to cricket with Sussex.

    Also Alistair & Angus Fraser. Alastair's career was relatively brief. I witnessed his debut where he took 3 wickets v the NZ tourists. My sole recollection was of him being repeatedly driven for runs by Martin Crowe though!

    Lastly I feel I must defend Mark Waugh. While he may not have possessed Steve's all round grittiness his batting was more pleasing on the eye & he remains one of my favourite Aussie cricketers of the 90s.

  • on May 6, 2014, 14:49 GMT

    No contest: the Pattinson brothers! Please, Peter Moores, no more selections like that one!

  • RandomTalk on May 6, 2014, 13:51 GMT

    Just to add to your list of overshadowed relatives, India had a few. The most famous of the lot I can think of is the Amarnath trio of father & sons, Lala, Mohinder and Surinder. The latter most was an elegant left handed batsman, but never did make the headlines as did his father Lala, and brother Mohinder.

    The other pair I can think of are the Nayadu brothers, CK and CS, the former being the dominant batsman, and in the limelight.

    Finally, there are the Pathan brothers, Irfan and Yusuf who have slowly faded from the spotlights of Indian cricket. Personally, I'm disappointed about Irfan, who I think is a very fine cricketer.

  • on May 6, 2014, 13:27 GMT

    I think Mark Waugh deserves a mention, too. He did play 128 tests and was a fine batsman, but he was nowhere near his brother. Steve was a legend and always overshadowed Mark.

  • CodandChips on May 6, 2014, 13:12 GMT

    Do the McCullums count? Nathan is an excellent cricketer, but is underrated, and his brother is just so good.

    In county cricket many famous grandsons. Nick Compton, Ben Hutton, Brett Doliveira, Fabian Cowdrey.

    Joe Gatting Mike Gatting?

    Father and son. Broads, Tremletts, Bairstows, Sidebottoms

    Billy Root subbed for England in the Ashes while Joe Root played.

  • NK67 on May 5, 2014, 18:47 GMT

    Chris Smith & Robin Smith. Chris, an opening bat suffered the dubious distinction of being out 1st ball on his debut v NZ 1983. I was there for the 2nd innings & thankfully got off the mark quickly going on to make 40 odd. Robin made his debut in 1988 v WI & enjoyed a longer International career.

  • on May 7, 2014, 14:43 GMT

    What about Ian Botham's son Liam, did play for Hampshire.

  • crktcrzy on May 7, 2014, 2:46 GMT

    I believe Majid Khan & Jehangur Khan were worth a mention- also Mudassar Nazar and his father

  • mshyder on May 7, 2014, 1:26 GMT

    We can add the Mohammed & Rana families from Pakistan alongwith the Miandad and Raja brothers (their third brother Zaeem played 1st class cricket for some time). Then what about Viv Richards & Ian Botham's sons.

  • on May 7, 2014, 1:06 GMT

    Shane LEE? Al-rounder who could have played for any other country but Australia

  • NK67 on May 6, 2014, 22:01 GMT

    Mike & Steve Gatting. They both started off at Middx but Steve's career never went beyond 2nd XI cricket. Instead he made his name as as footballer with Arsenal, Brighton, & Charlton. Steve's son, Joe, started off as a footballer for Brighton before switching to cricket with Sussex.

    Also Alistair & Angus Fraser. Alastair's career was relatively brief. I witnessed his debut where he took 3 wickets v the NZ tourists. My sole recollection was of him being repeatedly driven for runs by Martin Crowe though!

    Lastly I feel I must defend Mark Waugh. While he may not have possessed Steve's all round grittiness his batting was more pleasing on the eye & he remains one of my favourite Aussie cricketers of the 90s.

  • on May 6, 2014, 14:49 GMT

    No contest: the Pattinson brothers! Please, Peter Moores, no more selections like that one!

  • RandomTalk on May 6, 2014, 13:51 GMT

    Just to add to your list of overshadowed relatives, India had a few. The most famous of the lot I can think of is the Amarnath trio of father & sons, Lala, Mohinder and Surinder. The latter most was an elegant left handed batsman, but never did make the headlines as did his father Lala, and brother Mohinder.

    The other pair I can think of are the Nayadu brothers, CK and CS, the former being the dominant batsman, and in the limelight.

    Finally, there are the Pathan brothers, Irfan and Yusuf who have slowly faded from the spotlights of Indian cricket. Personally, I'm disappointed about Irfan, who I think is a very fine cricketer.

  • on May 6, 2014, 13:27 GMT

    I think Mark Waugh deserves a mention, too. He did play 128 tests and was a fine batsman, but he was nowhere near his brother. Steve was a legend and always overshadowed Mark.

  • CodandChips on May 6, 2014, 13:12 GMT

    Do the McCullums count? Nathan is an excellent cricketer, but is underrated, and his brother is just so good.

    In county cricket many famous grandsons. Nick Compton, Ben Hutton, Brett Doliveira, Fabian Cowdrey.

    Joe Gatting Mike Gatting?

    Father and son. Broads, Tremletts, Bairstows, Sidebottoms

    Billy Root subbed for England in the Ashes while Joe Root played.

  • on May 6, 2014, 11:38 GMT

    What about Mohinder and Surinder amarnath... and the Pathans...

  • on May 6, 2014, 11:28 GMT

    Jeff Crowe? He might have captained NZ, but he wasn't Martin. Or Russell, for that matter!

  • Hareendra on May 6, 2014, 8:33 GMT

    What about the Ranatungas! Arjuna greatly overshadowed three other siblings: Dhammika, Nishantha and Sanjeewa.

  • gavster70 on May 6, 2014, 7:28 GMT

    Don Bradman did have a brother, Vic ! He played a little bush cricket in Bowral.

  • kensohatter on May 6, 2014, 7:09 GMT

    Mark Waugh was a great player in his own right! The guy scored like 8,000 test runs + was a better ODI player and fielder than Steve. He also was far better at reading pitch conditions and weather forecasts....

  • jimmy_the_champ on May 6, 2014, 6:59 GMT

    Lee brothers? While Brett Lee touched many different heights and became one of the finest FAST bowlers, all-rounder brother Shane Lee had to retire at, as early as 29 due to knee troubles.

  • Barnbarroch on May 6, 2014, 5:50 GMT

    Eric Bedser, overshadowed by the great Alec.

  • India_boy on May 6, 2014, 4:33 GMT

    What about the mohammad brothers of Pakistan, no matter what they did, always overshadowed by Hanif's 337* !

  • J751 on May 6, 2014, 3:24 GMT

    Another set of brothers from Pakistan were the Elahi brothers.Manzoor Elahi was a hard hitting lower order batsman and useful medium pacer.His brother Salim Elahi,made his ODI debut with a hundred and had a fairly good record in the format.A third brother,Zahoor Elahi also played for Pakistan.

  • on May 6, 2014, 1:47 GMT

    How about Alec Bannerman?

  • drfarnsworth on May 5, 2014, 22:52 GMT

    People are saying Mark Waugh should be on the list, but I think Dean Waugh should, also known as Korea, the forgotten Waugh/War.

  • robelgordo on May 5, 2014, 22:02 GMT

    Two more Australian examples:

    Walter Giffen might be the only 'other' that not only was in the shadow of a relative, but owed his Test career to the politicking of that relative.

    Alec Bannerman was a decent player in the early days of Test cricket, but will always be overshadowed by brother Charles making 165 retired hurt in the first Test.

  • on May 5, 2014, 19:09 GMT

    See also: any number of Edriches who played for their family XI but never hit the heights enjoyed by Bill and John.

  • NK67 on May 5, 2014, 19:05 GMT

    No mention yet of the Bracewell family & their contribution to NZ cricket. In all there were 4 brothers; Brendon, Doug, Mark, & John. Brendon & John played International cricket with John having a distinguished career.

    Brendon's son, Mark, is a current International player while Mark's son, Michael, also plays fc cricket.

  • Engle on May 5, 2014, 16:50 GMT

    Dayle Hadlee (brother of Richard), David Murray (son of Everton Weekes), Mudassar Nazar (son of Nazar Mohammed). Also, the Nourses from S.Africa, Shillingfords from Dominica, W.I.

  • on May 5, 2014, 15:11 GMT

    Ranathunga Brothers of Sri Lanka.....Dulip Samaraweera d Elder bro of Much known Thilan....

  • Jonathan_E on May 5, 2014, 14:54 GMT

    Aamir Malik of Pakistan: one of the few people to have scored a century, taken a wicket and made a stumping in Tests, though of course not in the same Test (he was primarily a middle-order batsman, plus occasional sixth bowler and stand-in wicket-keeper). But he always lived in the shadow of his more talented brother Salim, a far finer batsman.

    Chris Cowdrey isn't the only one of Colin's sons to have suffered by comparison with the father: his brother Graham had a higher batting average for Kent, but never came close to England selection.

    Ian Greig, younger brother of Tony and also an all-rounder, was fortunate to get a couple of Tests in 1982.

    Richard Hutton, son of Len, played five Tests as a fast-medium bowler who could bat a bit.

    Bobby Parks of Hampshire, son of Jim the wicketkeeper (46 tests) and grandson of Jim the all-rounder (1 test) was never selected for England... but kept wicket for an afternoon as a substitute, following an injury to Bruce French.

  • Jonathan_E on May 5, 2014, 14:32 GMT

    Eric Bedser was, of course, unfortunate - not only were Lock and Laker his rivals for the spin bowler's position in the England side, but for his position in the Surrey side as well (England also had to consider Johnny Wardle of Yorkshire as well, who may actually have been the best spinner of the lot, and might have played a lot more were he not so outspoken.) In fact he concentrated on improving his batting to be considered as an all-rounder mainly because otherwise there might not have been room for him as a third spinner in the Surrey side except when Laker and Lock were on Test duty.

    Mark Butcher, for several years a regular in the England side and unlucky to be dropped when he was, had a father (A.R.) who played only a few Tests, and a brother (G.P.) who played no Tests at all.

  • KK-cricket on May 5, 2014, 14:26 GMT

    Indian families missing from the list: Amarnaths (Lala, Surinder, Mohinder), Manjarekars (Vijay, Sanjay), Mankads (Vinoo, Ashok)

  • J751 on May 5, 2014, 14:00 GMT

    @Michael Jones,I didn't mention Majid Khan's cousin 'who was a pretty handy player" as this article is about "the others." By the way,Majid Khan also had another cousin Javed Burki who captained Pakistan and a father who was a famous fast bowler.

  • SaudFaruqi on May 5, 2014, 13:40 GMT

    WasIm Raja, Ramiz Raja, Zaeem Raja plus their father Saleem Akhtar. The first two played for Pakistan with distinction.

  • on May 5, 2014, 13:28 GMT

    @NK67: Andy and Guy Whittall were cousins, not brothers. They had three pairs of brothers in the same XI only once (Flowers, Rennies and Strangs vs New Zealand, Harare 1997) and a twelfth man (Andy Whittall) whose cousin was in the playing XI.

    @J751: as well as his son, Majid Khan also had a cousin who was a pretty handy player...

  • on May 5, 2014, 13:26 GMT

    one prospective candidate for this list - arjun tendulkar !

  • Gizza on May 5, 2014, 13:09 GMT

    Shane Lee (Brett's older brother) is another one. Judging from the comments, there's a quite a few.

  • NK67 on May 5, 2014, 13:01 GMT

    The Zimbabwe team of the 90's had several pairs of brothers playing...often in the same XI; Andy/Grant Flower, Andy/Guy Whittall, Gavin/John Rennie, & Bryan/Paul Strang.

  • Oxonion on May 5, 2014, 12:20 GMT

    Although the Raja brothers had a pretty similar career in terms of the stats, there was no comparison when it came to popularity and crowd pulling power; Wasim Raja was not only light years ahead of his younger sibling Ramiz in that, but in his pomp his popularity was matched by only a few. In Pakistan, only Fazal Mahmood, Imran Khan and Shahid Afridi came in the same bracket as far as popularity and fan following was concerned. His jet black flowing hair, sauve bearded image and nonchalant arrogance against the fastest of bowlers had that unexplained euphoric seduction that made everyone, young and old, swoon! The educated wisdom that he carried, added to the Wasim Raja addiction. If ever a crowd puller sir, ever ever a crowd puller.

  • J751 on May 5, 2014, 11:28 GMT

    Bazid Khan,the son of "Majestic" Majid Khan played a solitary Test for Pakistan.Faisal Iqbal,a nephew of Javed Miandad has been in and out of the Pakistan side for over a decade and has one Test hundred and an average in the mid 20s.Another famous cricketing family from Pakistan is that the Ranas,its most famous member being umpire Shakoor Rana.Two of his brothers Shafqat Rana and Azmat Rana played Test cricket while another brother Sultan Rana narrowly missed out,having to be content with a 12th man spot.

  • J751 on May 5, 2014, 9:46 GMT

    The Mohammad brothers of Pakistan come to mind.Hanif and Mushtaq are very well known and Sadiq to a lesser extent.There was also Wazir Mohammad who got two Test hundreds and a fifth brother Raess Mohammad,who while being a First-class cricketer never got the chance to play Test cricket.Hanif's son Shoaib is also a lesser known figure than his illustrious father although he had a very good Test record.

  • Nutcutlet on May 5, 2014, 9:18 GMT

    And another Surrey-related posting. Alec Bedser and his identical twin, Eric. Alec: 51 Tests, 236 wickets @24.9. Knighted for services to cricket. Eric: no Tests, but a more than useful allrounder in the great Surrey side. Despite their inseparable-ness in appearance and in society, there is no doubt which was the immortal -- and Eric would have had much pleasure in agreeing with that universally held opinion.

  • Nutcutlet on May 5, 2014, 8:50 GMT

    facebook user (May 5, 2014, 7:41 GMT): what you say is true for the casual under fifty cricket lover, but, take it from me, Micky Stewart was an excellent cricketer out of the top drawer. Although he only played a handful of Tests, he would have played many more if he'd not suffered from a major illness when touring India as vice captain in 1963. He was a member of the all-conquering Surrey side of the '50s where his fielding at shortleg, usually square and absurdly close (without a helmet remember!) was breath-takingly brilliant (77 catches in 1957). He was also a courageous opener who, again without modern protection, faced Wes Hall and Charlie Griffith with significant success. Moreover, he was considered good enough to be chosen as a Wisden cricketer of the year in 1958. I saw Micky Stewart play many times. His late cut was as good as anyone's I've ever seen. His son is worthy of him, make no mistake. One does not live in the shadow of the other. Stats never tell the full story.

  • on May 5, 2014, 8:44 GMT

    I would not put Peter Pollock as being overshadowed. That overlooks the lack of tests in his era plus the onset of apartheid. The example from India that would stand out would be Surinder and Mohinder Amarnath. Surinder scored a century overseas on his test debut and had a good series against England in 1976-77 but could not sustain. Mohinder was nearly shut out of the test side post 1979 but came back with astonishing brilliance in 1982-83 against Pakistan and WI. The other examples from India would be CK Nayudu overshadowing CS Nayudu and Subhas Gupte towering over Baloo Gupte.

  • on May 5, 2014, 7:41 GMT

    I don't think we can include Peter Pollock or Mark Waugh, they were solid players in their own right. I think overshadowing would be the example of Trevor Chappell. I think also with the Stewarts, the only reason we know about Micky is because of his coaching, otherwise as players Alec certainly overshadowed Micky.

  • CodandChips on May 5, 2014, 7:41 GMT

    Billy Root subbed for England in the Ashes

  • CodandChips on May 5, 2014, 7:38 GMT

    Brett Doliveira Joe Gatting Fabian Cowdrey

  • CodandChips on May 5, 2014, 7:34 GMT

    Nick Compton and Dennis Compton. Len and Ben Hutton

  • on May 5, 2014, 6:59 GMT

    Another one that could have been thrown in there: Ahmed Amla

  • D.V.C. on May 5, 2014, 6:52 GMT

    How on Earth can some commentors be suggesting Mark Waugh should be on the list!? Mark is in my mind Australia's best ever ODI player. He did everything but keep wicket. He was our best slip fielder, our most brilliant outfielder. He batted as an opener and in the top order, always with a better SR than was the norm at the time. In his early career he bowled 140+ km/h and was used just about every game as an offspinner in his later career. The transition to opener was particularly impressive, because it came at a time when ODI strike rates really started increasing, and he did more than keep pace. You could make a case for Steve overshadowing Mark in Tests, but in ODIs Australia have had no better player than Mark Waugh.

  • trigga315 on May 5, 2014, 6:39 GMT

    @Terry Jones and Michael Brammer You do realise there were two more Waugh brothers one who played Sheffield Shield and the other who represented NSW at state age level. Their uncle also played state cricket.

  • ReverseSweepRhino on May 5, 2014, 6:29 GMT

    WG Grace's less prominent cricketing relatives can make an XI of their own, apparently: Brother - EM Grace, Brother - GF Grace, Cousin - WG Rees, Cousin - GHB Gilbert, Cousin - WL Rees, Cousin - WJ Pocock, Cousin - WR Gilbert, Son - WG Grace jnr, Son - CB Grace, Nephew - H Grace, Nephew - NV Grace

    Also, Grant Flower, Peter Pollock (and Mark Waugh, suggested as an entrant by other commentators) would have a shot at being considered for the World XI in their prime, so they can't possibly be too sad that their family members were better than them.

    Also, where is a thought for Shane Lee?

  • TigerLoves2Kill on May 5, 2014, 6:04 GMT

    Why is there no mention of the Amarnath family?

  • on May 5, 2014, 5:00 GMT

    Surely Mark Waugh must be on here, perhaps the unluckiest brother of all time

  • landl47 on May 5, 2014, 4:17 GMT

    There are lots of others- just off the top of my head, Eric Bedser, Richard Hutton and Leslie Compton come to mind. How about Tim Tremlett, whose father and son both played for England? And, of course, a modern example is another Compton- Nick, Dennis's grandson.

  • spykersaj on May 5, 2014, 3:51 GMT

    How come there is no mention of the Ranatunga's..None of Arjuna's brothers were able to emulate the chubby captains success

  • on May 5, 2014, 3:45 GMT

    I think its a bit far fetched to say Grant Flower was upstaged by his brother Andy, as Grant played 67 tests. It would be like saying Mark Waugh had been upstaged by his brother Steve. If Grant gets on this list then I think Mark should as well.

  • on May 5, 2014, 3:42 GMT

    "Imagine if Don Bradman had had a brother..." That sounds like a fodder for a book I want to read already.

  • Rowayton on May 5, 2014, 3:06 GMT

    A bit off topic, but I looked at the scorecard of Mervyn Harvey's test, and was interested to note that in the first innings Hutton batted 236 minutes and faced 274 balls. That means Australia bowled the equivalent of 90 six ball overs in the first 4 hours; whereas nowadays it takes six and a half, even if they get them in at all. That Aussie side had Lindwall and Miller - how have overrates slowed down so much? By the way, I wonder how John Benaud would have gone with modern bats? He used to give the ball an almighty whack with the 'toothpick'.

  • Rowayton on May 5, 2014, 3:06 GMT

    A bit off topic, but I looked at the scorecard of Mervyn Harvey's test, and was interested to note that in the first innings Hutton batted 236 minutes and faced 274 balls. That means Australia bowled the equivalent of 90 six ball overs in the first 4 hours; whereas nowadays it takes six and a half, even if they get them in at all. That Aussie side had Lindwall and Miller - how have overrates slowed down so much? By the way, I wonder how John Benaud would have gone with modern bats? He used to give the ball an almighty whack with the 'toothpick'.

  • on May 5, 2014, 3:42 GMT

    "Imagine if Don Bradman had had a brother..." That sounds like a fodder for a book I want to read already.

  • on May 5, 2014, 3:45 GMT

    I think its a bit far fetched to say Grant Flower was upstaged by his brother Andy, as Grant played 67 tests. It would be like saying Mark Waugh had been upstaged by his brother Steve. If Grant gets on this list then I think Mark should as well.

  • spykersaj on May 5, 2014, 3:51 GMT

    How come there is no mention of the Ranatunga's..None of Arjuna's brothers were able to emulate the chubby captains success

  • landl47 on May 5, 2014, 4:17 GMT

    There are lots of others- just off the top of my head, Eric Bedser, Richard Hutton and Leslie Compton come to mind. How about Tim Tremlett, whose father and son both played for England? And, of course, a modern example is another Compton- Nick, Dennis's grandson.

  • on May 5, 2014, 5:00 GMT

    Surely Mark Waugh must be on here, perhaps the unluckiest brother of all time

  • TigerLoves2Kill on May 5, 2014, 6:04 GMT

    Why is there no mention of the Amarnath family?

  • ReverseSweepRhino on May 5, 2014, 6:29 GMT

    WG Grace's less prominent cricketing relatives can make an XI of their own, apparently: Brother - EM Grace, Brother - GF Grace, Cousin - WG Rees, Cousin - GHB Gilbert, Cousin - WL Rees, Cousin - WJ Pocock, Cousin - WR Gilbert, Son - WG Grace jnr, Son - CB Grace, Nephew - H Grace, Nephew - NV Grace

    Also, Grant Flower, Peter Pollock (and Mark Waugh, suggested as an entrant by other commentators) would have a shot at being considered for the World XI in their prime, so they can't possibly be too sad that their family members were better than them.

    Also, where is a thought for Shane Lee?

  • trigga315 on May 5, 2014, 6:39 GMT

    @Terry Jones and Michael Brammer You do realise there were two more Waugh brothers one who played Sheffield Shield and the other who represented NSW at state age level. Their uncle also played state cricket.

  • D.V.C. on May 5, 2014, 6:52 GMT

    How on Earth can some commentors be suggesting Mark Waugh should be on the list!? Mark is in my mind Australia's best ever ODI player. He did everything but keep wicket. He was our best slip fielder, our most brilliant outfielder. He batted as an opener and in the top order, always with a better SR than was the norm at the time. In his early career he bowled 140+ km/h and was used just about every game as an offspinner in his later career. The transition to opener was particularly impressive, because it came at a time when ODI strike rates really started increasing, and he did more than keep pace. You could make a case for Steve overshadowing Mark in Tests, but in ODIs Australia have had no better player than Mark Waugh.