Numbers Game July 25, 2014

Bhuvneshwar on course for super series

Only 15 times in Test history has a player achieved the double of 300 runs and 20 wickets in a Test series. Going on current form, Bhuvneshwar could well be the 16th
24

Bhuvneshwar Kumar has been outstanding with both bat and ball this summer, averaging 69.66 as a batsman and 16.81 as a bowler © Getty Images

He didn't win the Man-of-the Match award in either Test, but almost everyone will agree that Bhuvneshwar Kumar has been the most influential player of the series in the first two Tests in England. Murali Vijay is the only one who runs him close, with 317 runs from four innings, but Bhuvneshwar's all-round show has been unmatched so far: to go with his 209 runs, he has also taken 11 wickets. His batting average is 69.66, and his bowling average 16.81; the difference between the two, which is a convenient way to measure all-round excellence, is 52.84. His lowest score with the bat in four innings is 36, and two out of three times with the ball he has returned a five-for. It used to be said about Bhuvneshwar that he is only effective at the start of an innings when the ball is new, but in England he has mixed it up well: of his 11 wickets, five have been with a ball that's less than 15 overs old (first or second new ball), and six with a ball older than that.

Given that this is a five-Test series and only two have been played so far, Bhuvneshwar is theoretically heading for a bounty with both bat and ball. It's unlikely that his batting form will continue blemish-free over the next three Tests, while the conditions at The Oval, for instance, might not give him the best chance for a five-for, but if he does continue at the current rate of scoring runs and taking wickets, he will finish the series with 522 runs, and 27 wickets. That'll make him only the second player, and the first in over 100 years, to score 500-plus runs and taken 25-plus wickets in a series. (South Africa's Aubrey Faulkner scored 545 runs and took 29 wickets in a five-Test series against England in 1910.)

That, admittedly, is a rather tall order and quite far-fetched. What isn't so far-fetched is Bhuvneshwar scoring 300-plus runs and taking 20-plus wickets in the series, if he stays fit and plays all of the remaining three Tests. If he does manage that, it'll only be the 16th such instance in Test history, and Bhuvneshwar will become the 13th player to achieve such a feat. The last player to score 300-plus runs and take 20-plus wickets in a Test series was Andrew Flintoff, in the 2005 Ashes.

Over the last couple of decades, instances of players doing well with both bat and ball in a series have become increasingly rare, because the breed of high-class allrounders has gradually been on the decline. If ever proof was needed about Garry Sobers' all-round genius, here's one stat to illustrate his greatness: between 1962 and 1966, Sobers achieved this feat three times - at home against India in 1962, and in England in 1963 and 1966. That means 20% of all such instances in Test history have come from one player alone. In the 1966 series, Sobers scored 722 runs at an average of 103.14, and took 20 wickets at 27.25; the difference between the two averages was 75.89, which is the highest such differential among these 15 instances; against India in 1962 the difference was 50.10, the third-best among the lot. Apart from Sobers, the only other player who achieved this feat more than once was Australia's Keith Miller. Both his instances were against West Indies - at home in 1951-52, and in the West Indies in 1955.

In the early 1980s, three of the four great allrounders of that era entered this club: Ian Botham achieved it in the unforgettable 1981 Ashes series, Richard Hadlee did it against England in 1983, while Kapil Dev achieved the double in the home series against England in 1981-82, in a series where Botham scored 440 runs and took 17 wickets. Imran Khan, surprisingly, never achieved this double. He scored more than 300 in a series only once, in India in 1986-87, but in that series he took only eight wickets to go with his 324 runs. The closest he came to this double was on India's tour to Pakistan in 1982-83, when he took 40 wickets and scored 247 runs; however, Pakistan's top-order batsmen were so good in that series that Imran batted only five times in six Tests. (Click here for Imran's series-wise stats.)

However, since those exploits by Hadlee in 1983, there have been only two instances of a player scoring 300-plus runs and taking 20-plus wickets. Between August 1983 and February 2001, there were no such instances, before Shaun Pollock scored 302 runs and took 20 wickets in the West Indies. If Bhuvneshwar does get there, it'll only be the third such double in the last 30 years.

Allrounders who scored 300+ runs and took 20+ wkts in a series since 1960
Player Series Matches Runs Bat ave Wkts Bowl ave Ave diff
Garry Sobers India in WI. 1961-62 5 424 70.66 23 20.56 50.10
Garry Sobers WI in England, 1963 5 322 40.25 20 28.55 11.70
Garry Sobers WI in England, 1966 5 722 103.14 20 27.25 75.89
Tony Greig England in WI, 1973-74 5 430 47.77 24 22.62 25.15
Ian Botham The Ashes in England, 1981 6 399 36.27 34 20.58 15.68
Kapil Dev England in India, 1981-82 6 318 53.00 22 37.95 15.04
Richard Hadlee NZ in England, 1983 4 301 50.16 21 26.61 23.54
Shaun Pollock SA in West Indies, 2000-01 5 302 75.50 20 23.20 52.30
Andrew Flintoff The Ashes in England, 2005 5 402 40.20 24 27.29 12.90

Of the 15 times this double has been achieved in a Test series, eight have been at home and seven overseas, with Sobers being the only one to do it twice away from home.

Among Indians, Kapil's effort against England in 1981-82 is the only one that meets the 300 runs, 20 wickets criteria. However, reducing the entry points to 250 runs and 15 wickets ensures there are six other performances, but none since February 1983, when Kapil, again, scored 254 runs at an average of 42.33, and took 17 wickets at 24.94 against the mighty West Indians on their home soil, in a five-Test series India lost 2-0. That means it's been more than 30 years since an Indian achieved this double. Kapil himself struggled towards the end of his career: only twice in his last 18 series did he take 15 or more wickets, but he contributed four of the seven instances of Indians achieving the double of 250 runs and 15 wickets.

In the last 31 years, there've been, excluding Bhuvneshwar's performance in England, only five instances of Indians scoring 200-plus runs and taking ten or more wickets in a series. R Ashwin came close to the 250-run, 15-wicket double in the home series against England in 2012-13, but his 14 wickets came at a high average of 52.64 (which is about as much as the difference between Bhuvneshwar's batting and bowling averages in the current series). On a tour to Australia, Manoj Prabhakar came close too, scoring 224 runs and taking 19 wickets.

Currently, the difference between Bhuvneshwar's batting and bowling averages in this series is 52.84, which captures, in a nutshell, what an extraordinary series he has had so far. It might not look quite as good by the time the series ends, but in these two Tests, Bhuvneshwar has served notice - as much by the manner in which he has batted and bowled, as by the actual numbers - of just how good he can be.

Indians who've scored 250+ runs and taken 15+ wickets in a series
Player Series Matches Runs Bat ave Wickets Bowl ave Ave diff
Chandu Borde England in India, 1961-62 5 314 44.85 16 28.75 16.10
Salim Durani India in WI, 1961-62 5 259 28.77 17 35.29 -6.51
Rusi Surti India in Australia, 1967-68 4 367 45.87 15 35.20 10.67
Kapil Dev WI in India, 1978-79 6 329 65.80 17 33.00 32.80
Kapil Dev Pakistan in India, 1979-80 6 278 30.88 32 17.68 13.20
Kapil Dev England in India, 1981-82 6 318 53.00 22 37.95 15.04
Kapil Dev India in WI, 1982-83 5 254 42.33 17 24.94 17.39

S Rajesh is stats editor of ESPNcricinfo. Follow him on Twitter

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Johnny_129 on July 26, 2014, 12:48 GMT

    Careful, Mr Rajesh - You might just create another Irfan Pathan with articles like these! India needs Bhuvi as a bowler, first and foremost. Some lower order runs is of course a bonus. BUT PLEASE, let's not mention Bhuvi and Sobers in the same sentence or even the same article!!!

  • Rowayton on July 26, 2014, 9:52 GMT

    Just out of interest, Sobers did it for a fourth time for Rest of the World v England in 1970, games that were called tests at the time but were later downgraded.

  • ladycricfan on July 26, 2014, 7:15 GMT

    Don't expect too much too soon from the youngster. He is nicely maturing into a good all round cricketer. This article should be written once he has achieved it not before.

  • ashok16 on July 26, 2014, 3:21 GMT

    Yes, he has been very good but we are going too far comparing him to the all rounder heavy weights. 90% of Indian bowlers in the last decade have lost pace or got injured within 2 years. My wishlist for him is simple- at least be bowling with the same skill set in 2 years. Batting, yes it is a bonus, and helps the team, but does not really matter for his survival at this level. Just ask Irfan Pathan and R Ashwin, what exactly their batting got them besides the all rounder tag.

  • on July 26, 2014, 1:43 GMT

    Team india slowly moving towards the next dimension .

  • on July 25, 2014, 23:57 GMT

    I am so excited for Bhuvi. He is an awesome talent. Even though passionate, doesn't lose his head like Sreesanth.. He will be the leader of Indian bowling pack for long time...

  • on July 25, 2014, 20:13 GMT

    Batting average minus bowling average as a measure of how allrounders are faring. I'm ashamed to say, I'd never thought of that! It's so simple, the first instinct is, you've got to weigh bowling average a bit heavier, but no, you don't. It's a great measure. Nice one Rajesh, you've made my day.

  • paddles952 on July 25, 2014, 13:46 GMT

    yip and only hadlee did it in 4 tests.... gotta question these stats ( in a series) when only 3 teams play more than 3 tests in a series nowadays.... these stats should always come with an asterisk ( payed more games than quality players from other teams).... Imagine what cairns, vettori, kallis, wasim ...would have done if they had been allowed to paly proper test series

  • asifismail on July 25, 2014, 12:45 GMT

    Sorry, I hope something like this happen. But playing with statistics which is far from possible (With amount of time left) is injustice to a player. He's is very talented and is in good from right now. I hope it continues. Journalism is at its best when FACTS ARE WELL PRESENTED.........

    This is just an expression of my opinion. Not CRITICISM.....

  • on July 25, 2014, 12:08 GMT

    very good bhuvi !! ... he is future for indian bowling. my concern is don't drag him too much in batting like irfan pathan ... let him bat ! don't force him to bat well by pushing in upper order.

  • Johnny_129 on July 26, 2014, 12:48 GMT

    Careful, Mr Rajesh - You might just create another Irfan Pathan with articles like these! India needs Bhuvi as a bowler, first and foremost. Some lower order runs is of course a bonus. BUT PLEASE, let's not mention Bhuvi and Sobers in the same sentence or even the same article!!!

  • Rowayton on July 26, 2014, 9:52 GMT

    Just out of interest, Sobers did it for a fourth time for Rest of the World v England in 1970, games that were called tests at the time but were later downgraded.

  • ladycricfan on July 26, 2014, 7:15 GMT

    Don't expect too much too soon from the youngster. He is nicely maturing into a good all round cricketer. This article should be written once he has achieved it not before.

  • ashok16 on July 26, 2014, 3:21 GMT

    Yes, he has been very good but we are going too far comparing him to the all rounder heavy weights. 90% of Indian bowlers in the last decade have lost pace or got injured within 2 years. My wishlist for him is simple- at least be bowling with the same skill set in 2 years. Batting, yes it is a bonus, and helps the team, but does not really matter for his survival at this level. Just ask Irfan Pathan and R Ashwin, what exactly their batting got them besides the all rounder tag.

  • on July 26, 2014, 1:43 GMT

    Team india slowly moving towards the next dimension .

  • on July 25, 2014, 23:57 GMT

    I am so excited for Bhuvi. He is an awesome talent. Even though passionate, doesn't lose his head like Sreesanth.. He will be the leader of Indian bowling pack for long time...

  • on July 25, 2014, 20:13 GMT

    Batting average minus bowling average as a measure of how allrounders are faring. I'm ashamed to say, I'd never thought of that! It's so simple, the first instinct is, you've got to weigh bowling average a bit heavier, but no, you don't. It's a great measure. Nice one Rajesh, you've made my day.

  • paddles952 on July 25, 2014, 13:46 GMT

    yip and only hadlee did it in 4 tests.... gotta question these stats ( in a series) when only 3 teams play more than 3 tests in a series nowadays.... these stats should always come with an asterisk ( payed more games than quality players from other teams).... Imagine what cairns, vettori, kallis, wasim ...would have done if they had been allowed to paly proper test series

  • asifismail on July 25, 2014, 12:45 GMT

    Sorry, I hope something like this happen. But playing with statistics which is far from possible (With amount of time left) is injustice to a player. He's is very talented and is in good from right now. I hope it continues. Journalism is at its best when FACTS ARE WELL PRESENTED.........

    This is just an expression of my opinion. Not CRITICISM.....

  • on July 25, 2014, 12:08 GMT

    very good bhuvi !! ... he is future for indian bowling. my concern is don't drag him too much in batting like irfan pathan ... let him bat ! don't force him to bat well by pushing in upper order.

  • Pelham_Barton on July 25, 2014, 12:03 GMT

    I agree with anoop3301 on (July 25, 2014, 7:22 GMT). The ratio seems to me to be a more appropriate measure here. The really good performances will come out well by either measure, but it is instructive to compare the two measures on Kapil Dev's four performances in the final table. The ratios work out to 1.99, 1.74, 1.39, and 1.69 in the order given. The 1978-79 performance is still the clear winner, but 1979-80 moves up from fourth to second best, which feels right to me.

  • jimbond on July 25, 2014, 11:34 GMT

    @faizal26- I wouldnt be too critical of Rishi Dhawan, he has hardly got any chance to prove himself as he plays for a relatively weak team at the first class level. If we ignore this difference in difficulty level at the first class level, Rishi Dhawan's performance (Batting average of 40 and bowling average of 23) is slightly better than Bhuvaneshwar Kumar (Batting average of 31 and a bowling average of 26 at the first class level). Else, he is also a swing bowler who would have relished the English conditions. Dhawan also captained his Ranji side and has been driving them to perform in the past couple of seasons. He is still young at 24 and though he bowls at Bhuvaneshwar Kumar's pace, he bats much better. Lets hope he does well.

  • faizal26 on July 25, 2014, 10:42 GMT

    @Realistic_cri_fan what a ridiculous comment comparing Rishi Dhawan with Bhuvneshwar Kumar. As far as I have seen Rishi Dhawan is neither a good batsman nor a good bowler. He just gives occasional good performance in either of the department. As a bowler he is too far away from Bhuvi's quality. Yes, he is one of the upcoming allrounders in India, but as a cricket fan, I find it offensive when I see someone saying Rishi Dhawan 'is in par' with Bhuvi.

  • cric_J on July 25, 2014, 7:43 GMT

    He has simply been the best player till now from both sides. Making an early case for Player of the series maybe. Anyways, delighted for him.

  • highveldhillbilly on July 25, 2014, 7:36 GMT

    No offense but the double of 300 runs and 20 wickets in a Test series is meaningless as most players don't get to play 5 test series. How many 5 test series did Kallis play compared to Botham or Flintoff etc? It all depends if you play for one of the "elite" teams (these days India, Aus or Eng), if you don't you'll probably never get to play anything above a 3 test series.

  • anoop3301 on July 25, 2014, 7:22 GMT

    Rajesh, I beg to differ on the statement that the difference between batting avg and bowling avg is the measure of excellence for all rounders. This approach will make it terribly skewed towards batting all rounders. I would rather go with the ratio of batting average to bowling average. This gives Bhuvaneswar Kumar a score of above 4 which is still outstanding by any standards and comparable to the best all round performances ever. It remains to be seen whether he can maintain or come close to such high standards over 5 tests.

  • aliahmedsheikh on July 25, 2014, 7:18 GMT

    Imran's 212 runs (at 53.00) and 21 wickets (at 18.57) in THREE Test matches in England in 1982 to me is better than anything in the above list...

  • vikram501 on July 25, 2014, 7:03 GMT

    @Karthik: Explain why it is a poor metric and why these are Apples and Oranges. Both these measures (Batting and Bowling Averages) are based on runs and wickets. Batting Average is the number of runs scored before conceding ones wicket. Bowling Average is number of runs conceded before taking a wicket. The difference does give a measure of how effective the all round performance of a player is.

    It is one thing to say that you don't agree with this metric and in that case you need to provide reasons and if possible a better metric. The way you have just dismissed what was provided shows that you do not have even a basic understanding of statistics and hence you justify your point by providing ridiculous analogies.

  • on July 25, 2014, 6:43 GMT

    Hadlee only had 4 tests to make it to this list. What a champ.

  • Realistic_cri_fan on July 25, 2014, 5:54 GMT

    Another underrated all-rounder who is in par with B.Kumar is Rishi Dhawan.He too is a swing bowler who can bat well with the tail( has 3 FC centuries).Hope the selectors will select him soon.

  • on July 25, 2014, 4:53 GMT

    bhuvi is playing freddy for india this summer

  • jimbond on July 25, 2014, 4:40 GMT

    @Karthik: It may be a poor metric, but one which is frequently used to assess allrounders. And people who have their batting average higher than their bowling average are indeed allrounders. As far as Bhuvaneshwar is concerned, it would be prudent advice to avoid counting the chicken before they hatch. It is early days yet. S Rajesh could also have run statistics of players who took more than ten wickets in the first two tests and ended up with less than 20 wickets for the series. Both lists provided are impressive- there is not one doubtful case in the lot. These have been the great allrounders of cricketing history.

  • caldruid on July 25, 2014, 4:11 GMT

    It is a little too early to hypothesize about how much he will score with the bat/ball. Better to make this call after the 3rd test or even half-way through 4th. That being said, he has certainly done very well so far. He is one of the few players who deserves a place in the team in both ODIs and tests.

  • on July 25, 2014, 3:50 GMT

    "His batting average is 69.66, and his bowling average 16.81; the difference between the two, which is a convenient way to measure all-round excellence, is 52.84."

    What a poor metric. Why not compare the length of his fingers with the length of his toes? Ever heard of why it's not correct to compare apples and oranges? Same reason you can't subtract 5 oranges from 10 apples.

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • on July 25, 2014, 3:50 GMT

    "His batting average is 69.66, and his bowling average 16.81; the difference between the two, which is a convenient way to measure all-round excellence, is 52.84."

    What a poor metric. Why not compare the length of his fingers with the length of his toes? Ever heard of why it's not correct to compare apples and oranges? Same reason you can't subtract 5 oranges from 10 apples.

  • caldruid on July 25, 2014, 4:11 GMT

    It is a little too early to hypothesize about how much he will score with the bat/ball. Better to make this call after the 3rd test or even half-way through 4th. That being said, he has certainly done very well so far. He is one of the few players who deserves a place in the team in both ODIs and tests.

  • jimbond on July 25, 2014, 4:40 GMT

    @Karthik: It may be a poor metric, but one which is frequently used to assess allrounders. And people who have their batting average higher than their bowling average are indeed allrounders. As far as Bhuvaneshwar is concerned, it would be prudent advice to avoid counting the chicken before they hatch. It is early days yet. S Rajesh could also have run statistics of players who took more than ten wickets in the first two tests and ended up with less than 20 wickets for the series. Both lists provided are impressive- there is not one doubtful case in the lot. These have been the great allrounders of cricketing history.

  • on July 25, 2014, 4:53 GMT

    bhuvi is playing freddy for india this summer

  • Realistic_cri_fan on July 25, 2014, 5:54 GMT

    Another underrated all-rounder who is in par with B.Kumar is Rishi Dhawan.He too is a swing bowler who can bat well with the tail( has 3 FC centuries).Hope the selectors will select him soon.

  • on July 25, 2014, 6:43 GMT

    Hadlee only had 4 tests to make it to this list. What a champ.

  • vikram501 on July 25, 2014, 7:03 GMT

    @Karthik: Explain why it is a poor metric and why these are Apples and Oranges. Both these measures (Batting and Bowling Averages) are based on runs and wickets. Batting Average is the number of runs scored before conceding ones wicket. Bowling Average is number of runs conceded before taking a wicket. The difference does give a measure of how effective the all round performance of a player is.

    It is one thing to say that you don't agree with this metric and in that case you need to provide reasons and if possible a better metric. The way you have just dismissed what was provided shows that you do not have even a basic understanding of statistics and hence you justify your point by providing ridiculous analogies.

  • aliahmedsheikh on July 25, 2014, 7:18 GMT

    Imran's 212 runs (at 53.00) and 21 wickets (at 18.57) in THREE Test matches in England in 1982 to me is better than anything in the above list...

  • anoop3301 on July 25, 2014, 7:22 GMT

    Rajesh, I beg to differ on the statement that the difference between batting avg and bowling avg is the measure of excellence for all rounders. This approach will make it terribly skewed towards batting all rounders. I would rather go with the ratio of batting average to bowling average. This gives Bhuvaneswar Kumar a score of above 4 which is still outstanding by any standards and comparable to the best all round performances ever. It remains to be seen whether he can maintain or come close to such high standards over 5 tests.

  • highveldhillbilly on July 25, 2014, 7:36 GMT

    No offense but the double of 300 runs and 20 wickets in a Test series is meaningless as most players don't get to play 5 test series. How many 5 test series did Kallis play compared to Botham or Flintoff etc? It all depends if you play for one of the "elite" teams (these days India, Aus or Eng), if you don't you'll probably never get to play anything above a 3 test series.