DaimlerChrysler confirms cricket ties

Vehicle manufacturer DaimlerChrysler confirmed their sponsorship of cricket on the Border for a further three years to March, 2004, at a glittering ceremony at Buffalo Park, headquarters of Border cricket, here last night.

Peter Martin

April 15, 2001

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EAST LONDON - Vehicle manufacturer DaimlerChrysler confirmed their sponsorship of cricket on the Border for a further three years to March, 2004, at a glittering ceremony at Buffalo Park, headquarters of Border cricket, here last night.

The Divisional Manager of Mercedes-Benz passenger cars, Dan Moeletsi, who is based in Pretoria, said DaimlerChrysler's 10-year association with Border cricket has been a mutually happy one, and he congratulated Pieter Strydom and his Border Bears team-mates on doing so well this season.

"DaimlerChrysler is a powerful partner for Border cricket," he emphasised. "There's a great passion for cricket on the Border and we're pleased to be part of it."

Moeletsi said the sponsorship would be used for cricket development and the Border academy, with the rest going to the umbrella sponsorship of the Border Cricket Board. The cricket development programme has seen 110 fields and 130 nets built to cater for the young talent which is emerging from the area.

The chairman of Border Bears, Robbie Muzzell confirmed that out of 124 players selected for Border age-group teams this past season, 81 were players of colour, many of them coming through the development programme.

He paid tribute to two members of the development programme, Greg Hayes and Raymond Booi, whose hard work has seen some grand results. Hayes and Booi were awarded with plaques for their 10-year service in the programme.

Strydom and Border Bears coach Richard Pybus both gave speeches in which they expressed their disappointment that Border did not bring home a trophy this summer, although doing so well in both domestic competitions. The appreciative crowd was entertained by the East London College Choir and the Buffalo Park Dancing Girls.

© Border Cricket Board

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