England v Bangladesh, NatWest Series, The Oval June 16, 2005

Strauss and Trescothick restore order

England 192 for 0 (Trescothick 100*, Strauss 82*) beat Bangladesh 190 (Aftab 51, Harmison 4-39) by 10 wickets
Scorecard and ball-by-ball details



Jon Lewis: three early wickets © Getty Images

Marcus Trescothick celebrated his 100th one-day international appearance with an effortless 76-ball century, and Andrew Strauss marked his return to the top of the order with a composed 82, as England cantered to a ten-wicket victory inside 25 overs in the first match of the NatWest Series. The result was England's second ten-wicket victory in one-day international history, and Trescothick has been involved in both - the first, against West Indies in 2000, came in his debut series.

By the end of the game, England were in such control that the pair were more concerned with engineering a three-figure score for Trescothick than winning in haste. He and Strauss exchanged singles in the final over to bring up his hundred, then Strauss followed up with a eased drive for four to complete the formalities.

Towards the end, Trescothick had been in showboater mode, and pulled off two cheeky ramped fours over the wicketkeeper's head to further dent Khaled Mahmud's figures, whose first over had gone for 21. Trescothick's hundred was his ninth in one-day matches for England, and took him clear of Graham Gooch as England's leading centurymaker.

It was a consummate performance from England, and for Trescothick it took his summer's tally against Bangladesh to a monstrous 445 runs in three innings. The team's only wobble came with the ball when, having reduced Bangladesh to 76 for 6, Aftab Ahmed and Mohammad Rafique came out all guns blazing, to exactly double the total in a spirited seventh-wicket stand. The tenth-wicket pair of Mashrafe Mortaza and Nazmul Hossain then added 31 in similar fashion to set England a respectable target of 190, but in the event they were never remotely stretched.

The day began as it finished, with England in total control. Last week, Jon Lewis vowed not to have his hair cut until the dream start to his England career had come to an end. By the time he had picked up the first three Bangladeshi wickets to fall, it seemed he would soon be sporting a mullet to rival Jason Gillespie's. Steve Harmison then weighed in with a trio of his own, and another mismatch appeared to be taking shape.

Rafique and Aftab had other ideas and after the second break for rain, they began to tee off. Each has demonstrated this ability before in their careers - Rafique with a thrilling century against West Indies last year, and Aftab with his 82 not out at Durham in this month's second Test - and they were at their improvisatory best as England's eagerness to wrap up a quick finish backfired on them. The usually economical Andrew Flintoff proved particularly expensive, as his nine wicketless overs went for 46, and it required a tight run-out call to end Aftab's knock, as he finished on 51 from 58 balls with four fours and two sixes.

Darren Gough eventually ended the stand, as Rafique connected well with a slower ball but picked out Harmison on the fine leg boundary, and Harmison returned to take his fourth wicket, when Mahmud shovelled his first delivery to leg gully. But Bangladesh were unbowed, and Mashrafe and Nazmul carried on the carefree attitude to ensure that England, with a crunch match approaching on Sunday, couldn't start thinking too far ahead of themselves just then.

But if Bangladesh's best efforts restored their pride with the bat, Marcus Trescothick and Andrew Strauss were more than capable of bettering them. The first stumbling-block of the NatWest Series had been negotiated with barely a stubbed toe, and England now travel to Bristol for the showdown against Australia with their spirits as high as can possibly be.

Andrew Miller is UK editor of Cricinfo