New Zealand v England, 2nd Test, Wellington, 1st day March 13, 2013

Compton and Trott in double-century stand

51

England 267 for 2 (Compton 100, Trott 121*) v New Zealand
Scorecard and ball-by-ball details

When you blunder, as New Zealand's captain Brendon McCullum surely did, by choosing to bowl in the second Test, you must at least hope to succumb gloriously to a feat of derring do. It must be the understated hundreds that are the worst to bear, the sort of hundreds that tell you quietly and repeatedly that you are being punished for your sins, the sort of hundreds delivered for England in Wellington by Nick Compton and Jonathan Trott.

Compton now has back-to-back Test centuries, his labours on his debut tour in India bearing fruit in New Zealand, providing an assertion that he has talent to go along with an abundance of resolve. But it was Trott who made it through to the close, so methodical that he might have been a student of time and motion, breaking a complex task into such simple, logical steps in a manner that his efficiency could not be faulted.

This was a day when the world was engrossed by white smoke rising from the Vatican to mark the election of a new Pope - they even burst into applause at Basin Reserve when a spectator appeared in a Pope fancy dress. After England lost only two wickets in the day, McCullum, like those in Rome, had reason to contemplate cardinal sins.

Compton and Trott might not be the most extravagant double act in the world, in fact they might wear down a crowd as much as they wear down an opposing attack, but they progressed in an orderly fashion which encapsulated the discipline at the heart of this England set-up and New Zealand's attack sensed from an early hour that they faced a day of hard labour. They were fortunate that the left-arm spinner, Bruce Martin, played a successful holding role, 27 overs rewarded with the wicket of Compton, who was still on 100 when he drove at a delivery that was not quite there and edged to Ross Taylor at first slip.

McCullum had won the toss in Cape Town in January and chose to bat, a new captain eager to make a statement, and saw New Zealand dismissed for 45, demolished by Vernon Philander. In Wellington, it felt more like a concession, an acceptance that New Zealand's batting dared not be risked on the first morning against England's pace attack. Things tend to go awry most often for weaker sides, but his logic was faulty on both occasions.

The skies became bluer by the minute, the breeze of the Cook Strait was light and northerly, and a drought in Wellington has left the city with only 20 days' rain. It is going to pour down later in the match, apparently. The pitch had more bounce than Dunedin, but it was comfortably-paced and true, and not a ball deviated for the pace bowlers in the air or off the pitch. At one point a Paradise Duck waddled onto the square to take a look, and all the signs were that paradise belonged to England.

Compton, in particular, looked in confident mood after his breakthrough hundred in Dunedin. There he had again displayed masses of resolution, a batsman of character trying to prove his mettle. Here he revealed a more expansive side of his batting character. New Zealand want sedate batting surfaces to protect their batting and their bowlers must suffer the consequences.

Such perceptions, though, are often unfair to Trott. He reached his century 50 balls faster than Compton - 174 compared to 224 - but because he played so methodically, and because his innings had less importance for an already-established career, he passed almost unnoticed. His hundred came up with such a supremely controlled pull against Neil Wagner, a shot of a batsman ticking over with absolute certainty, that it summed up the understated nature of his innings.

Compton's hundred, by contrast, was reached flamboyantly as he took two boundaries off Wagner in three balls, a square cut on one knee followed by an equally bracing drive on the up through extra cover.

He pulled well against the new ball and relaxed into some pleasing drives, attacking wide deliveries from Wagner and Trent Boult that he would have left in Dunedin. But he was not quite as sound as Trott, surviving a few fierce forays over gully and, on 65, he escaping an lbw appeal from Martin by dint of an inside edge. His most worried look came at 119 for 1, when New Zealand managed a ball change and he briefly worried that it might swing.

England rattled up 40 from six overs immediately after lunch, but then, one suspects, Trott had a word and any over-excitability disappeared. As England slowed in mid-afternoon, most activity came from Trott's facial expressions, furious chewing and rictus grins. Martin turned one past Trott's outside edge, just once, and that was enough to win him deep respect for the rest of the session, 16 overs for 23 by tea.

Alastair Cook had been hailed by McCullum as second only to Don Bradman ahead of the Wellington Test, which historians will scoff was another misjudgement, and Cook was the only England batsman to miss out, out for 17. There was a suggestion that a fullish delivery from Wagner stopped in the pitch a little, but Cook's balance was awry, a failing of old, as he pushed a simple catch to short mid-on. He looked askance at the pitch and later could also be expected to look askance at the laptop replay.

New Zealand's quicks, thwarted by England after leading by 293 in the first Test, would have been forgiven for a secret sigh of anguish that they were back in the field so quickly after bowling 114 overs in the second innings in Dunedin in a forlorn attempt to force victory. It is already hard to imagine them forcing victory here.

David Hopps is the UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • jmcilhinney on March 14, 2013, 6:15 GMT

    McCullum must have thought that the surface would do a bit more or maybe hoped that England would repeat their first innings performance from Dunedin. Given that Cook said he would have bowled too, probably the former. Either way, it appears to have been a good toss to lose for England. Unless something goes awry, you'd expect England to bat through most of tomorrow and, with KP, Bell, Root and Prior doing much of the batting, for the scoring to go a bit quicker than today. Not that I'm complaining though, as Compton and Trott have laid a perfect platform for the middle order to launch from. They could hit 600 and be in the field by stumps tomorrow if someone really gets going. If they stay focused then they really can't lose this one. It's mainly a matter of whether there will be enough in the surface for them to bowl NZ out twice in time. Scoreboard pressure could well play its part but holding their catches will be imperative too.

  • JG2704 on March 15, 2013, 8:55 GMT

    @SurlyCynic on (March 14, 2013, 19:39 GMT) If you actually read the article ,BM (from NZ!!) was saying that "BEHIND Bradman" Cook right now was as good as anyone. So , his average doesn't even necessarily come into it as it doesn't necessarily reflect his current form. Kind of funny though that he was out to such a lame shot

  • on March 14, 2013, 23:42 GMT

    Great, disciplined batting by England! Trott, we know..... Compton was really impressive. Wish our SL guys have this same mental attitude.

  • on March 14, 2013, 20:58 GMT

    @Si Baker You want Radio Sport, they're the ones who broadcast it. They have live streaming on their site.

  • Selassie-I on March 14, 2013, 20:49 GMT

    @greatest-game agreed, we should keep them the way we are, it wouldnt be right seeing a dustbowl lords. And we'd probably struggle to make a turner out of anything much north of edgebaston.

    sporting wickets are a must, something in for the bat and the ball, either spun or seamed. I think whatever the pitches england should beat the aussies this summer, but it might well be close. Our batting should be stronger but as we showed the other day we're still more than capable of a complete collapse.

  • SirBazza on March 14, 2013, 20:23 GMT

    Another poor display from NZ. A shame we didn't get the toss right, but hindsight is a wonderful thing. Lets hope NZ can take quick wickets and get back into this game otherwise it's going to be all over by the end of today. If we can bowl them out for under 400 we will be doing well. This game is already looking like a victory to England

  • SurlyCynic on March 14, 2013, 19:39 GMT

    @JG2704: I was commenting on the hype from the English media after McCullums comparison of Cook to Bradman. The BBC published a statistical comparison of the two. Every broadsheet had an article on it. Sky Sports News interviewed various cricketers asking them to compare the two.

    Not one of these features stated that comparing Bradman to a limited batsman averaging less than 50 is ridiculous. This to me is hype, and worthy of comment.

  • JG2704 on March 14, 2013, 19:04 GMT

    @SurlyCynic on (March 14, 2013, 11:14 GMT) May be a bit hard for you to grasp this , but the last Cook articles was from Brendon Mccullam. Last time I looked New Zealand was as far away from England as your posts are from balance.

  • JG2704 on March 14, 2013, 19:04 GMT

    Re the toss. One of the NZ commentators said if you win the toss you bowl - like it was always the thing to do so without hindsight it's always easy.

    Cook will be livid with getting out to such a soft dismissal. Compton may not be too happy either as he got out to one of the most unthreatening looking spinners and knows he could have gone on to a 150 or better.

  • matthEw12345 on March 14, 2013, 18:42 GMT

    I think Compton and Trott batted very well they tired out the NZ Bowlers as the day went on. I also think McCullum mad a bad desicion to bowl first but hopefully the NZers can toil hard and bowl them out for under 430.

  • jmcilhinney on March 14, 2013, 6:15 GMT

    McCullum must have thought that the surface would do a bit more or maybe hoped that England would repeat their first innings performance from Dunedin. Given that Cook said he would have bowled too, probably the former. Either way, it appears to have been a good toss to lose for England. Unless something goes awry, you'd expect England to bat through most of tomorrow and, with KP, Bell, Root and Prior doing much of the batting, for the scoring to go a bit quicker than today. Not that I'm complaining though, as Compton and Trott have laid a perfect platform for the middle order to launch from. They could hit 600 and be in the field by stumps tomorrow if someone really gets going. If they stay focused then they really can't lose this one. It's mainly a matter of whether there will be enough in the surface for them to bowl NZ out twice in time. Scoreboard pressure could well play its part but holding their catches will be imperative too.

  • JG2704 on March 15, 2013, 8:55 GMT

    @SurlyCynic on (March 14, 2013, 19:39 GMT) If you actually read the article ,BM (from NZ!!) was saying that "BEHIND Bradman" Cook right now was as good as anyone. So , his average doesn't even necessarily come into it as it doesn't necessarily reflect his current form. Kind of funny though that he was out to such a lame shot

  • on March 14, 2013, 23:42 GMT

    Great, disciplined batting by England! Trott, we know..... Compton was really impressive. Wish our SL guys have this same mental attitude.

  • on March 14, 2013, 20:58 GMT

    @Si Baker You want Radio Sport, they're the ones who broadcast it. They have live streaming on their site.

  • Selassie-I on March 14, 2013, 20:49 GMT

    @greatest-game agreed, we should keep them the way we are, it wouldnt be right seeing a dustbowl lords. And we'd probably struggle to make a turner out of anything much north of edgebaston.

    sporting wickets are a must, something in for the bat and the ball, either spun or seamed. I think whatever the pitches england should beat the aussies this summer, but it might well be close. Our batting should be stronger but as we showed the other day we're still more than capable of a complete collapse.

  • SirBazza on March 14, 2013, 20:23 GMT

    Another poor display from NZ. A shame we didn't get the toss right, but hindsight is a wonderful thing. Lets hope NZ can take quick wickets and get back into this game otherwise it's going to be all over by the end of today. If we can bowl them out for under 400 we will be doing well. This game is already looking like a victory to England

  • SurlyCynic on March 14, 2013, 19:39 GMT

    @JG2704: I was commenting on the hype from the English media after McCullums comparison of Cook to Bradman. The BBC published a statistical comparison of the two. Every broadsheet had an article on it. Sky Sports News interviewed various cricketers asking them to compare the two.

    Not one of these features stated that comparing Bradman to a limited batsman averaging less than 50 is ridiculous. This to me is hype, and worthy of comment.

  • JG2704 on March 14, 2013, 19:04 GMT

    @SurlyCynic on (March 14, 2013, 11:14 GMT) May be a bit hard for you to grasp this , but the last Cook articles was from Brendon Mccullam. Last time I looked New Zealand was as far away from England as your posts are from balance.

  • JG2704 on March 14, 2013, 19:04 GMT

    Re the toss. One of the NZ commentators said if you win the toss you bowl - like it was always the thing to do so without hindsight it's always easy.

    Cook will be livid with getting out to such a soft dismissal. Compton may not be too happy either as he got out to one of the most unthreatening looking spinners and knows he could have gone on to a 150 or better.

  • matthEw12345 on March 14, 2013, 18:42 GMT

    I think Compton and Trott batted very well they tired out the NZ Bowlers as the day went on. I also think McCullum mad a bad desicion to bowl first but hopefully the NZers can toil hard and bowl them out for under 430.

  • SirViv1973 on March 14, 2013, 18:39 GMT

    @Greatest_Game, I would also add to your comment that we thought a turning pitch had been prepared in Cardiff in 09 to benefit us having a perceived advantage in the spin department. With Warne gone it seemed like we had a huge advantage with Swann & Monty against the lightly regarded Hauritz. In the end it wasn't the case as Swann & Monty managed 1-258 between them with Hauritz to his credit out bowling them both for match figs of 6-158. To be fair there was far less turn than we were led to expect & the surface was flat enough to allow Monty & Jimmy to bat out on an hour on the final afternoon for that famous draw.

  • on March 14, 2013, 18:28 GMT

    The toss scenario presented a neat encapsulation of international cricket's increasingly alarming over-reliance on computerisation. No significant breeze, hardly a cloud in the sky & a pitch so shorn of grass that I half-expected a squadron of camels to lollop across it at any moment: in short, ideal batting conditions. Yet both captains said they'd have bowled first, presumably because the statisticians had already decided that that's the way to go at the Basin Reserve *irrespective of the evidence* clearly presented to anyone bothering to take their snouts out of their laptops & have a cursory glance at both the pitch & the overhead conditions.

    Compton & Trott paced themselves to perfection yesterday, but we'll need to get a wriggle on today with a 60% chance of rain forecast for both Days Four & Five. We should be aiming for a 500+ declaration half an hour after tea, leaving our seamers 20 overs or so with which to breach the Kiwis' top order.

  • on March 14, 2013, 17:54 GMT

    @CricketingStargazer: yup, as a collective the Kiwi radio & TV commentators are undoubtedly the best in the world, Coney & Richardson being the best of the bunch I've seen/heard so far. Thanks for the recommendation: I think I'll give Radio New Zealand a whirl tonight as well. It'll make a welcome change from Sky & TMS.

  • Greatest_Game on March 14, 2013, 17:25 GMT

    @ Selassie-I Yes, I do agree with you about Swanny's tough outing at the Oval. He was, as far as I can remember, let down by his teammates.

    My point really was that a team should play to it's strengths, but at the same time not overplay them. India got hammered by churning out rank turners and then getting spun out by Monty and Swann. Drastically changing home pitches will result in the games seeming like an away tour for the home players.

    Pitches usually have well known characteristics, and should be kept that way. They are part of the history of each ground, and of the long and quirky history of the game. Changing the pitch lays waste to that history, and to the unique attraction of cricket. A nasty rank turner would just not do justice to Lords, would it?

  • on March 14, 2013, 16:53 GMT

    Good start for England which is pleasing as an England fan, but even if the forcasted rain doesn't come still think we're going to be looking at a draw. Whilst I firmly believe you can't judge a pitch until both teams have batted on it. Early indications are that the pitch looks like a good batting track with not allot in it for the bowlers and don't see England taking 20 wickets on it, unless NZ seriously cave to scoreboard pressure. I can hope!

  • Staunch_for_NZ on March 14, 2013, 16:33 GMT

    The wicket was stubbon and did not help a bit.....but the boys kept on trucking and kept the run rate under control........looking bad for last day Monday for weather so after our boys come up with their large innings too it will be looking dood coming into Aucklands Eden Park....where I look forward to NZ historical series win as I predicted before the series started....

  • Selassie-I on March 14, 2013, 16:22 GMT

    @Posted by Greatest_Game on (March 14, 2013, 14:38 GMT) you can't really blame swanny for not taking too many on that oval road on days 2 & 3 of a test, it was really the batsmen and fielders who failed (and of course Amla batted superbly).

  • on March 14, 2013, 16:02 GMT

    Where are all the lets drop compton posts,amazing that.This guy even in india looked test class against a worst attack he is filling his boots but please you have to give guys time in test cricket i know this but others are to quick to ask for players to be dropped even though nick is opening and his average was 34 before the test`s here.some people know nothing about this great game,well done nick and england.

  • on March 14, 2013, 15:45 GMT

    bad decision on a good batting wicket. Brendon might still be getting nightmares of South Africa and decided to bowl. You can't win Test Match without taking initiatives. If you make bad decisions and then try to make amends you can at best salvage a draw. Full credit to Compton and Trott though for applying themselves and taking England to a strong position.

  • Selassie-I on March 14, 2013, 15:36 GMT

    @ Posted by Richie0802 on (March 14, 2013, 9:07 GMT) to be honest, as others have said, if that's your opinion then just stop watching test cricket. There are 'slow' periods but if your idea of cricket is watching the ball sail over the boundry rope again and again then just watch the short forms, however test cricket is also about temprement, defensive technique and a war of attrition between bowler and batsman. THat is why we love it, beacuse it has traits that are not seen in pretty much any other sport in the world.

    From England's point of view, their bowlers have already spent 2 days in the field and only had 3 days rest, the most important thing was to make them bowl all day again for little return. That is how you set up a ruthless crushing win. Ending up 350 all out at COP would leave the game wide open.

    The point that you make that is valid is that the pitch is a road and doesn't look like any bowler will get much out of it. We do need more sporting pitches in tests.

  • Hasheem on March 14, 2013, 14:45 GMT

    Why blame McCullum ,his bowlers were ordinary for sure. Both Nick and Trott made full use of the chance to make some runs. With weather coming in this will end in a draw for sure,unless something dramatic were to happen. Mind you England bowling on these true wickets looks nothing to get 20 wickets.

  • Greatest_Game on March 14, 2013, 14:38 GMT

    @ Jonathan Jono Lane, wrote "With England's superior spinners and new found ability to play spin, should England prepare turning pitches for the Australians … in England?"

    Jonathan, your memory is short. England tried that last year after tons of press hype that Eng & SA's pace attacks were matched, but that Swann's "vastly superior spin" gave Eng the advantage.

    Consequently, the Oval track was flat, looking like Swann's to own. SA's attack was off form on day 1 - the press crowing. But this was SA's 1st test in years without the tragically injured Boucher, & de Villiers was still finding rhythm. From day 2 it was all over. SA lost 2 wickets racking up 637 runs. Swann gave up 151 runs for no wicket.

    In the series, Swann took 4 wickets @ 77. Tahir tok 8 @ 47.25. And Eng's pacemen? Anderson, who the press had declared Steyn's equal, took 9 @ 40.66 to Steyn's 15 @ 29.2. Philander's 12 @ 23.66 was the best of the series.

    Bad strategy, Jonathan. Once badly spanked, twice shy!

  • on March 14, 2013, 14:15 GMT

    Excellent day of test cricket. Proving just how enjoyable the format is in it's purest form. The NZ bowlers bowled well for large parts of the day - without luck (Pietersen is lucky after that LBW shout) England batted well. This is the set up phase if you like. With both sides wanting to win this test in what is now a 2 test series the denoument will be a push for runs and wickets. Day 1 of any test is so often the hors d'oeuvre, and here it was a treat for those who love test cricket, setting up the rest of the match. How much better is this than the meaningless "hit and giggle" and increasingly generic "mush" of T20 boredom?

  • BenGundry on March 14, 2013, 13:55 GMT

    @ADB1, Here's a fact; in the last 3 years, Cook has scored more runs than any other batsman. Only Clarke comes close. In the last 5 years, Clarke and Cook have both scored over 5000 runs and 17 centuries each. So both have had an extended purple-patch. Amla, Sangakkara, de Villiers and others also impressive over this time but played less tests.

    So, McCullum's comments were definitely hyperbole, but not without merit, he did say "as good as any other player since Bradman", not "better than...".

  • landl47 on March 14, 2013, 13:50 GMT

    In the article about England's poor starts to test series, I made the point that this England team is not a side of dominating batsmen, KP apart. It's a side that gets on top by working hard and wearing down the opposition. Today was a perfect example of that. Provided they carry on from here and get a big total, NZ will bat knowing they have only a draw to play for.

    England's bowlers have now had 6 days' rest, as opposed to NZ's 3, and it will be the best part of 7 before they take the field. I'm expecting a much livelier performance from them and if Finn and Broad adjust their length to bowl a bit fuller, they'll be a handful. Weather permitting, England should win from this position.

    However, I was impressed by the way Southee, Boult and Wagner continued to give 100% through a long and fruitless day. They're all young and they all look like tremendous prospects. Martin also bowled very well. The Kiwis are always a great effort team, but this was England's day.

  • SirViv1973 on March 14, 2013, 13:35 GMT

    @JMChinney, If we do go on to make 500+ I feel we will need to try and get NZL in before the end of day 2. If the forecast is to be believed we may only have 3 & half ish days to try and win this game which will be extremley difficult given the nature of the pitch.

  • SirViv1973 on March 14, 2013, 13:28 GMT

    @CricketingStargazer, Could not agree with you more re compton. I couldn't believe there was even a debate about him opening the batting before this series. I think some people forgot that he shared 2 centrury opening stands with Cook in Ind & despite not nailing a really big score there he more than did the job & certainly contributed to the teams winning effort.

  • Selassie-I on March 14, 2013, 13:21 GMT

    Nick Compton now has the same ammount of test 100s as Shane Watson.... in 35 less matches.

  • bumsonseats on March 14, 2013, 12:41 GMT

    me thinks that comments like bad day for test cricket are loosing the plot i have watched test cricket for over 45 years and today was good test cricket. as good as 350 for 4 would be nice. but cricket followers of odis and t20 you have your game and its ok. but test cricket is the pinnacle of the game and as such will be remembered for over a lifetime. i can still remember things in tests that happened during those early years, but i cannot remember the result of the last international odi that i saw live. but if you don't like tests don't watch it, and if you do remarks like the above are not required.

  • ADB1 on March 14, 2013, 12:06 GMT

    @SurlyCynic: "But I was very disappointed in the way Captain 'Bradcook' got out, soft dismissal. After reading the hype from the English press I was expecting a double century at least."

    All I've seen are articles quoting McCullum, and Cooky politely saying the praise is a bit over the top.

    Care to provide some quotes from the British media agreeing with McCullums assessment? Or is this just more hype from you not backed up by facts?

  • 2.14istherunrate on March 14, 2013, 11:27 GMT

    That was a day for the purist, the perfect reply to an insertion.If McCullum had thought about it he would have known his attack could not roll over England cheaply twice. 2 wickets down for 267 is a testimony to the wrongheadedness of the decision. The pitch was so much one you would want to bat on and the sky alluringly cloudless, so where was the logic? I do not believe Cook would have bowled;it was his reply to McC's remarks about his batting-give a guy enough rope...! Cook's demise was a strange occurrence nonetheless, but one put out of the mind simply enough by the qualities we know that the in batsmen possess in spades. Certainty and more certainty. They played attractively enough and some of Compton's shots were glorious. There was probably no doubt Trott would make 100 -inevitability is his mentor at times;hopefully he can really nail home the message today and go very big. Compton's ton will have pleased most people as well as given him an extended run. He looks good.

  • on March 14, 2013, 11:27 GMT

    Richie0802 - you obviously dont understand Test cricket so good riddance if you stop watching. You'll be depriving yourself of THE best form of the game. Go and watch baseball or something else that wont tax your concentration levels.

  • SurlyCynic on March 14, 2013, 11:14 GMT

    Good batting by England. But I was very disappointed in the way Captain 'Bradcook' got out, soft dismissal. After reading the hype from the English press I was expecting a double century at least.

  • Trickstar on March 14, 2013, 10:01 GMT

    @ bobbo2 What because England didn't take 20 wickets last match and the warm up match you believe they can't take 20 wickets on this pitch? It's not been much of a problem over the last 4 years or so, on even more road like pitches than this one. I watched every over and NZ wasted the new ball, there was some decent bounce and a bit of swing for 30 overs or so & they also hardly made England play, when they did it was a poor ball. I reckon if England put a big total up, NZ will not handle the scoreboard pressure. Add to that I think the England bowlers will bowl a lot better this match and if the ball does swing when NZ bat like was expected, Anderson will be a nightmare.

  • on March 14, 2013, 9:44 GMT

    Excellent day for England, considering Cook's error in getting out. Might have preferred another 60 runs on the board, though? Hopefully the middle order can increase the tempo on the second day.

  • Mitty2 on March 14, 2013, 9:27 GMT

    @Jonathan Jono lane, especially when considering our current turmoil in India, and it would negate our primary and settled strength in our pace bowling. Not to mention the huge class differential in lyon and whoever our second spinner id (hopefully o'keefe) and wann and panesar.

    Starc looked listless when there was no assisstance off the pitch and no swing, siddle doesn't get wickets in India because he gets wickets off seaming it and hitting the deck, and the only reason patto got wickets is because of sheer pace. England will be able to play the pace better than India did.

    Let's also not forget the fact that England played nine tests in the sub continent in 2012, have experience, and we only played in the carribean. However, I posed the same question to the english a while ago, and the response was that it was impossible to prepare such pitches due to the lack of sun. Personally, I dont think there's much of a science to preparing rolled mud as surfaces, but I don't know haha

  • R_U_4_REAL_NICK on March 14, 2013, 9:18 GMT

    An interesting platform for England; tomorrow's first session will be significant. KP may have already had his 'early-innings-stutter/fright' (see over 87), so if he can fire tomorrow then England are on for a big total. Lacklustre pitch or lacklustre bowling? I think NZ should have made England's batsmen play more shots really.

  • bobbo2 on March 14, 2013, 9:15 GMT

    Both teams to bat yet. Clearly a road. With England having not bowled NZ or the NZ 11 out on this tour and rain forecast, good chance this will be a draw

  • on March 14, 2013, 9:09 GMT

    Slightly off subject: With England's superior spinners and new found ability to play spin, should England prepare turning pitches for the Australians when they come to England?

  • Richie0802 on March 14, 2013, 9:07 GMT

    Good day for England. Another terrible day for Test cricket. Like the rest of the world I'm thinking of giving up on Test cricket. Watching one team dominate another obviously inferior team can surely be nobody's idea of fun. Only the most one-eyed fan could get any pleasure out of watching the stodgy Compton and Trott pick off bowling which veered between average of awful on a dead track. McCullum's decision to put England in was obviously made in fear. Had NZ batted first the match would definitely have been over in three days. He was hoping for another aberration like we saw in the first Test. One-sided series, the IPL, the Big Bash etc are all driving people away from the five-day game and I may join them. Now it appears only England and SA can be bothered with Test cricket. Even Australia have succumbed. Watch England rack up 500+ then roll the Kiwis out twice. Oh joy. Let the celebrations begin.

  • CricketingStargazer on March 14, 2013, 9:04 GMT

    There seems to be some instant judgements that this pitch has nothing in it for the bowlers. We will see. It is never wise to judge a pitch until both sides have batted on it. Certainly the New Zealand bowlers did not make the best use of it and certainly did not challenge the batsmen much with the new ball. Let's wait before making hasty judgements. Maybe it is as flat as it has appeared and New Zealand are banking on three draws and a shared series. Maybe though, it is not!

  • Mambahunter on March 14, 2013, 8:38 GMT

    "Trott is in arguable the best in the world" I would certainly argue against that. LOL! But this match certainly reminds of the RSA-AUS adelaide match. This is what makes test cricket the best sport in the world!!!! Certain things that happened in a previous test hugely affects the next!!

  • slippingsillypoint on March 14, 2013, 8:37 GMT

    Pretty easy to see this will be a draw, highway of a pitch and rain forecast for day's 4&5.No chance of bowling the Kiwi's out twice before then. NZ to suprise at Eden park.

  • choppa13 on March 14, 2013, 8:25 GMT

    considering cook said in the toss interview that he would have bowled to had he won the toss so i think it was a misjudgement by all. just so happens that mccullum won the toss and would now be regretting the decision to bowl but hind sight is great.

  • Great-shot444 on March 14, 2013, 8:06 GMT

    NZ lost their best chance to beat ENG in first tes and Now it will be difficult for them to win this or 3rd. 1-0 england

  • CricketingStargazer on March 14, 2013, 8:05 GMT

    Yesterday everyone said that the fixed rule was win the toss and bowl. However, my feeling was always that if England batted and the openers got through the first hour they could make New Zealand regret it. I was listening to the excellent Radio New Zealand (free to air) commentary over the Internet and could not believe my ears. Over after over that the batsmen did not need to play at. If you haave just got through 170 overs 3 days ago the last thing you want is to squander your forces playing the batsmen in on an excellent pitch with badly directed bowling.

    If the forcecast were not so bad for days 4 & 5, I would suggest batting on even into day 3 if the chance arises and grind every last drop of resistence out of the opposition in the hope that they will fold twice. As it is, England may be forced to pick up the pace and pull out in an attempt to fire out a couple of wickets tomorrow evening, in the knowledge that this may be a 4-day match at best.

  • satishchandar on March 14, 2013, 7:07 GMT

    While his "Test giants" jinx almost paid off last game, he got it right again with "Best after Bradman" jinx this time. What for Compton and Trott next game Baz?

  • on March 14, 2013, 6:52 GMT

    @Hopps, could this one be your best article till date ? well honestly speaking, I wouldn't expect it to be. Always enjoy your articles, just as much as I enjoy cricket. Trott is in arguable the best in the world, a quench thirst for someone who believes in Rahul Dravid's school of cricket...Cook keeps cooking runs always, for a change he could rest a bit and let his guns deal the onslaught, he would be satisfied without doubt, far more than all around him crumbling and he playing a loner. England is right now on a fab run, keep it flowing !

  • CricketingStargazer on March 14, 2013, 6:44 GMT

    Anyone still want Joe Root to move up and open? That argument is now closed! People who followed Nick Compton's career knew that he could do it. The only doubt was if he himself knew that he could. Well, he should have no doubts now.

  • mikey76 on March 14, 2013, 6:41 GMT

    Could be a pitch where Monty comes into his own. If KP gets his foot down England could be 500 by tea or just after. That will give Cook licence for close catchers and Monty can wheel away into the breeze while the quicks rotate at the other end.

  • Mitty2 on March 14, 2013, 0:58 GMT

    Before the inevitable mccullum bashing because of the toss decision, as stated by some in the commentary, with the forecast of rain and the last two days, mccullum chose to bowl so they could force a draw. All though this is incredibly defensive, with the way England batted in the second innings and how easily they dealt with the NZ, I think this is the best chance for a NZ series win.

    Especially when considering england's notorious habit to bounce back after a poor performance in the first innings, and the parallels to the aus-SA game in Adelaide, which led to a SA win in the next game, being defensive is mcculum's best bet.

    England would have taken more out of the first test than NZ, and all though you could say that NZ would benefit from more than matching it with a superior team, like in Adelaide, a team who bats for so long can really take a lot of confidence from a draw ad generally performs better in the next test.

    If NZ manage a draw, they are a huge chance for a series win.

  • Mitty2 on March 14, 2013, 0:58 GMT

    Before the inevitable mccullum bashing because of the toss decision, as stated by some in the commentary, with the forecast of rain and the last two days, mccullum chose to bowl so they could force a draw. All though this is incredibly defensive, with the way England batted in the second innings and how easily they dealt with the NZ, I think this is the best chance for a NZ series win.

    Especially when considering england's notorious habit to bounce back after a poor performance in the first innings, and the parallels to the aus-SA game in Adelaide, which led to a SA win in the next game, being defensive is mcculum's best bet.

    England would have taken more out of the first test than NZ, and all though you could say that NZ would benefit from more than matching it with a superior team, like in Adelaide, a team who bats for so long can really take a lot of confidence from a draw ad generally performs better in the next test.

    If NZ manage a draw, they are a huge chance for a series win.

  • mikey76 on March 14, 2013, 6:41 GMT

    Could be a pitch where Monty comes into his own. If KP gets his foot down England could be 500 by tea or just after. That will give Cook licence for close catchers and Monty can wheel away into the breeze while the quicks rotate at the other end.

  • CricketingStargazer on March 14, 2013, 6:44 GMT

    Anyone still want Joe Root to move up and open? That argument is now closed! People who followed Nick Compton's career knew that he could do it. The only doubt was if he himself knew that he could. Well, he should have no doubts now.

  • on March 14, 2013, 6:52 GMT

    @Hopps, could this one be your best article till date ? well honestly speaking, I wouldn't expect it to be. Always enjoy your articles, just as much as I enjoy cricket. Trott is in arguable the best in the world, a quench thirst for someone who believes in Rahul Dravid's school of cricket...Cook keeps cooking runs always, for a change he could rest a bit and let his guns deal the onslaught, he would be satisfied without doubt, far more than all around him crumbling and he playing a loner. England is right now on a fab run, keep it flowing !

  • satishchandar on March 14, 2013, 7:07 GMT

    While his "Test giants" jinx almost paid off last game, he got it right again with "Best after Bradman" jinx this time. What for Compton and Trott next game Baz?

  • CricketingStargazer on March 14, 2013, 8:05 GMT

    Yesterday everyone said that the fixed rule was win the toss and bowl. However, my feeling was always that if England batted and the openers got through the first hour they could make New Zealand regret it. I was listening to the excellent Radio New Zealand (free to air) commentary over the Internet and could not believe my ears. Over after over that the batsmen did not need to play at. If you haave just got through 170 overs 3 days ago the last thing you want is to squander your forces playing the batsmen in on an excellent pitch with badly directed bowling.

    If the forcecast were not so bad for days 4 & 5, I would suggest batting on even into day 3 if the chance arises and grind every last drop of resistence out of the opposition in the hope that they will fold twice. As it is, England may be forced to pick up the pace and pull out in an attempt to fire out a couple of wickets tomorrow evening, in the knowledge that this may be a 4-day match at best.

  • Great-shot444 on March 14, 2013, 8:06 GMT

    NZ lost their best chance to beat ENG in first tes and Now it will be difficult for them to win this or 3rd. 1-0 england

  • choppa13 on March 14, 2013, 8:25 GMT

    considering cook said in the toss interview that he would have bowled to had he won the toss so i think it was a misjudgement by all. just so happens that mccullum won the toss and would now be regretting the decision to bowl but hind sight is great.

  • slippingsillypoint on March 14, 2013, 8:37 GMT

    Pretty easy to see this will be a draw, highway of a pitch and rain forecast for day's 4&5.No chance of bowling the Kiwi's out twice before then. NZ to suprise at Eden park.

  • Mambahunter on March 14, 2013, 8:38 GMT

    "Trott is in arguable the best in the world" I would certainly argue against that. LOL! But this match certainly reminds of the RSA-AUS adelaide match. This is what makes test cricket the best sport in the world!!!! Certain things that happened in a previous test hugely affects the next!!