Shane Bond May 11, 2010

Bond advises rest and rotation for quicks

Cricinfo staff
34

New Zealand quick bowler Shane Bond has said there is a danger of losing more fast bowlers from Test cricket unless boards and team managements rest them periodically.

"Bowlers are almost going to be like pitchers, where you play a game and sit out the next, because of the amount of cricket played these days," Bond told Cricinfo. "I worry that fast bowlers are going to withdraw from Test cricket early to play limited-overs cricket."

New Zealand's often-injured pace spearhead, who retired from Test cricket last year, said Australia were possibly the only team in a position to give their fast bowlers a break. "They win more than they lose. They seem to rotate bowlers even during series and still win. People tend to forget they are resting and rotating and giving guys a week off here and there. A lot of the other teams, because they are struggling to win 50-50, are just playing their best team all the time, and they suffer when there are injuries.

Bond turned out for Kolkata Knight Riders in the recent IPL and is now on show in the World Twenty20 in the Caribbean. He tipped the short format to develop as a showcase for fast bowlers. "You are not risking injury [in Twenty20] like you would when bowling eight- to nine-over spells, which sometimes can be dangerous."

Bond said his laziness as a teenager was to blame for the repeated breakdowns for which he became notorious over an all-too-short Test career. "The thing that hurt me the most was, I was really lazy in my late teens. Because of that, I got a lot of back problems. So I missed a lot of years from 17 to 23. I never had a good base for bowling. I just lacked it.

"I went away from cricket, and then I am back and all of a sudden bowling proper fast. I went from a little bit of cricket to international cricket, where I am bowling fast. That catch-up was too much. The difference in intensity at domestic and international levels is massive and people don't appreciate how big it is."

He ruled out a return to Tests but said younger bowlers could continue in the format as long as they managed their comebacks from injuries wisely. "I still see it now when I play with guys who are injured and they want to be back for a game that is, say, six weeks down the line. You've just got to come back when you are fully fit. Too many people - and I have made the mistake in the past - sometimes rush back to make a tour or a series even when they are not a 100% fit. You are better off taking it step by step."

Bond said the decision to quit Tests had been hard for him because he had badly wanted to get to 150 wickets in the format. "When I came back against Pakistan, I felt I had the opportunity once again to achieve those goals, and then, bang, I got injured. It was demoralising.

"Test cricket is about getting people out and that's what I do: I got people out. A lot of goals I wanted to achieve were built around Test cricket, but I am also a realist. I realised every time I played four- or five-day cricket, I broke if I played few games on the bounce. It is just the way I played: I find it difficult to hold back. I just go hard. It hurt me."

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on May 14, 2010, 13:52 GMT

    It's sad to see another genuine fast bowler leaving the game. But it was always a treat to watch Shane Bond in full flow. Still remember his devastating yorker to dismiss Sourav Ganguly in world cup 2003. Shane Bond can be looked up to by the future breed of fast bowlers as an inspirration. He has a wonderful run-up, a lethal yorker and a devastating bouncer. We will all miss you Shane !!

  • CSK-FAN on May 14, 2010, 13:02 GMT

    Guess every now and then IPL is being blamed or compared.I wonder "If the guys talking here for natinal pride will take up cricket given only the jercy to play for the country and left without any perks!".Everyone out here is to earn our bread and butter I wouldnt mind going for an additional egg for my breakfast!

  • scritty on May 14, 2010, 9:22 GMT

    A REST. You are joking. Bond played a total of 18 tests. EIGHTEEN! a total of sixty eight first class matches in all, and in every test, FC match, ODI, T20 , International T20 and domestiv limited overs game he bowled less than three and half thousand overs in 15 years. ABout 250 overs a year, or 4 balls a day.

    Yes their was practice and nets and training, but overall, despite being an excellent pace bowler, Bond bowled hardly any overs at all. If he had more of a rest he wouldn't have bowled at all.

    Compare that with Walsh, Ambrose, McGrath, Akram, Younis, Zaheer, even Malinga..and his workload looks very low indeed (incidentally, he played alongside or against all of those I have just named - it's not a "different era" thing)

    Bond was injury prone. He bowled very little - Simple as.

  • babya on May 14, 2010, 6:08 GMT

    @Ruri--I agree with u for england...but frankly speaking new zealand play very less cricket..Their home serioes also consists of 2 to 4 tests which is not that much..And u can chekc how less they tour through out the year and check the total no of matches played by their bowlers..

  • KiwiPom on May 14, 2010, 1:25 GMT

    Whatever Shane Bond achieved or failed to achieve in his fast-bowling career there's one that can NEVER be taken away from him. He earned by dint of performance the greatest of respect from Australia. That says it all really.

  • jasdeep94 on May 13, 2010, 18:52 GMT

    bond if you dont wanna play dont play and let others play

  • on May 13, 2010, 7:03 GMT

    @bharat:

    Dear Friend let me make my self a lil more clear...we know that all fast bowlers are more likely to get unfit then any other pro of the game and some bowlers are unfortunately are more prone to injuries like shoaib akhter, nehra & bond himself...what my point is you must keep yourself away from injuries by playing selective games...u r less likely to get injured by playing 5 matches then by playing in 15 matches...its simple probability maths...bond choose 15 matches of IPL and took more risk of getting injured and never complaint about it ....and when it comes to wearing your national jersey he start talking about his fitness and injuries...that is in my view is very selfish...he should either zip his lips and played the game with same intent as he was playing in IPL or he should have kept himself away from IPL to keep himself available for his real duty...

  • sweetspot on May 12, 2010, 14:59 GMT

    The name is BOND! What a bowler. We cannot get enough of him, unfortunately. But he's doing the right thing conserving his body, which is kind of fragile, admittedly due to his lazy physical regimens when he was 17-23! Kids take note - you want to stay long in sports, get fit early, get strong early, and stay that way. Those complaining about other people making too much money - just shut up! You would if you could.

  • BeeArr on May 12, 2010, 10:46 GMT

    To ali naqvi,In the article,Bond expressed his anxiety about teams losing quicker ones due to the lack of fitness and ability to withstand the longer format. He was complaining about world cup. And Bond is a real class act. May be he wasn't too professional and didn't take the return programmes from injuries seriously, but I have never seen him bowl less than 100 % percent. When he played, he was a breathe of fresh air. One of the true fast bowlers of the times. Plus he had a nice conventional swing and hit the deck with full venom. And someone said, he was inconsistent. Please elaborate. He was always injury-prone, but never inconsistent. Now it's Dale Steyn who takes the pacer of the earth from Bond and Mohammad Aamer is waiting in the wings. Long live true fast bowlers. Come on, give those flat track bullies who call themselves batsmen chin music...!!!

  • on May 12, 2010, 4:37 GMT

    Not agreed with you Mister Bond... You played a whole tiring and hectic season of IPL and u never complaint about it ....5 matches of WorldT20 with proper gap between each match makes you so tired that you are worried about being unfit...i know NZ cricket board is not paying you 750k for 15 matches...but you must remember that NZ gives you the opportunity to make money and more importantly to wear their colour...

  • on May 14, 2010, 13:52 GMT

    It's sad to see another genuine fast bowler leaving the game. But it was always a treat to watch Shane Bond in full flow. Still remember his devastating yorker to dismiss Sourav Ganguly in world cup 2003. Shane Bond can be looked up to by the future breed of fast bowlers as an inspirration. He has a wonderful run-up, a lethal yorker and a devastating bouncer. We will all miss you Shane !!

  • CSK-FAN on May 14, 2010, 13:02 GMT

    Guess every now and then IPL is being blamed or compared.I wonder "If the guys talking here for natinal pride will take up cricket given only the jercy to play for the country and left without any perks!".Everyone out here is to earn our bread and butter I wouldnt mind going for an additional egg for my breakfast!

  • scritty on May 14, 2010, 9:22 GMT

    A REST. You are joking. Bond played a total of 18 tests. EIGHTEEN! a total of sixty eight first class matches in all, and in every test, FC match, ODI, T20 , International T20 and domestiv limited overs game he bowled less than three and half thousand overs in 15 years. ABout 250 overs a year, or 4 balls a day.

    Yes their was practice and nets and training, but overall, despite being an excellent pace bowler, Bond bowled hardly any overs at all. If he had more of a rest he wouldn't have bowled at all.

    Compare that with Walsh, Ambrose, McGrath, Akram, Younis, Zaheer, even Malinga..and his workload looks very low indeed (incidentally, he played alongside or against all of those I have just named - it's not a "different era" thing)

    Bond was injury prone. He bowled very little - Simple as.

  • babya on May 14, 2010, 6:08 GMT

    @Ruri--I agree with u for england...but frankly speaking new zealand play very less cricket..Their home serioes also consists of 2 to 4 tests which is not that much..And u can chekc how less they tour through out the year and check the total no of matches played by their bowlers..

  • KiwiPom on May 14, 2010, 1:25 GMT

    Whatever Shane Bond achieved or failed to achieve in his fast-bowling career there's one that can NEVER be taken away from him. He earned by dint of performance the greatest of respect from Australia. That says it all really.

  • jasdeep94 on May 13, 2010, 18:52 GMT

    bond if you dont wanna play dont play and let others play

  • on May 13, 2010, 7:03 GMT

    @bharat:

    Dear Friend let me make my self a lil more clear...we know that all fast bowlers are more likely to get unfit then any other pro of the game and some bowlers are unfortunately are more prone to injuries like shoaib akhter, nehra & bond himself...what my point is you must keep yourself away from injuries by playing selective games...u r less likely to get injured by playing 5 matches then by playing in 15 matches...its simple probability maths...bond choose 15 matches of IPL and took more risk of getting injured and never complaint about it ....and when it comes to wearing your national jersey he start talking about his fitness and injuries...that is in my view is very selfish...he should either zip his lips and played the game with same intent as he was playing in IPL or he should have kept himself away from IPL to keep himself available for his real duty...

  • sweetspot on May 12, 2010, 14:59 GMT

    The name is BOND! What a bowler. We cannot get enough of him, unfortunately. But he's doing the right thing conserving his body, which is kind of fragile, admittedly due to his lazy physical regimens when he was 17-23! Kids take note - you want to stay long in sports, get fit early, get strong early, and stay that way. Those complaining about other people making too much money - just shut up! You would if you could.

  • BeeArr on May 12, 2010, 10:46 GMT

    To ali naqvi,In the article,Bond expressed his anxiety about teams losing quicker ones due to the lack of fitness and ability to withstand the longer format. He was complaining about world cup. And Bond is a real class act. May be he wasn't too professional and didn't take the return programmes from injuries seriously, but I have never seen him bowl less than 100 % percent. When he played, he was a breathe of fresh air. One of the true fast bowlers of the times. Plus he had a nice conventional swing and hit the deck with full venom. And someone said, he was inconsistent. Please elaborate. He was always injury-prone, but never inconsistent. Now it's Dale Steyn who takes the pacer of the earth from Bond and Mohammad Aamer is waiting in the wings. Long live true fast bowlers. Come on, give those flat track bullies who call themselves batsmen chin music...!!!

  • on May 12, 2010, 4:37 GMT

    Not agreed with you Mister Bond... You played a whole tiring and hectic season of IPL and u never complaint about it ....5 matches of WorldT20 with proper gap between each match makes you so tired that you are worried about being unfit...i know NZ cricket board is not paying you 750k for 15 matches...but you must remember that NZ gives you the opportunity to make money and more importantly to wear their colour...

  • NikhilPapad3 on May 12, 2010, 3:57 GMT

    What Shane Bond ahs said makes sense, apart from australia mot temas lack the depth in squads, wheras in the Australian team there is so much competition for places,especially fast bowlers, that the pklayer get rotated quite frequently, look at their depth, johnson,mckay,harris,hilfenhaus,siddle etc etc, all these players can take the 3spots as fast bowlers, the rest of the international teams lack this kind of quality depth, england propably come the closest with broad,anderson,oninons,bresnan etc etc. We will miss you Bondy!!!!!!!!

  • on May 12, 2010, 3:55 GMT

    I think it is right decission for a fast bowler with lots of injuries.oneday nd t-20 matches doesn't need too much overs to bowl.but,a bowler like Bond is not making full justice to his potential.Newzeland needs him....

  • Number_5 on May 12, 2010, 2:38 GMT

    As an Aussie it is always great watching Bond bowl agaisnt us as he gave his utmost all. Its sad that we wont get to see him play Test cricket again, as it is the highest and most competitive form of cricket. But you have to feel for players around the world who are forced into early retirement from cricekt just so they can earn a living playing in the two lesser formats of the game. Maybe the ICC should re think the pay scales of cricket and reward those who play at the highest level? It would be nice, but pie in the sky if all ICC nations had the best interests of the game at heart and not just their own pockets. Good luck Shane, hopefully we see you bowl for many years to come.

  • reeja on May 12, 2010, 2:38 GMT

    Bond, you were really unlucky. but still people think that you are great.

  • Joji_ on May 12, 2010, 2:17 GMT

    Shane Bond is a class in himself, no doubt about that. I would go to the stadium just to see him bowling. He has that charisma which parts him from the crowd. But he has only got 87 test wickets. He is inconsistent at best and he 35. He good, but he isn't great. Also over the years the real problem with NZ test cricket has never been their bowling, its their failure to dug in, spend time on the crease and put up big scores.

  • bobagorof on May 12, 2010, 1:42 GMT

    What this article is saying to me is that fast bowlers need to do a lot of strengthening work in their late teens (when they are developing) - the period when Bond admits to being lazy - if they want to have longevity in the game. The best way to do that, in my opinion, is to have match fitness through playing regular games day in, day out through a summer. Back in the 50s, 60s and 70s bowlers in England used to be playing nearly every day with nowhere near the injuries experienced today - their bodies were used to bowling for extended periods. The difference is that they would then have a winter to rest. Currently, international players don't play domestically so they still get time off between matches, so it should even out. But I think that the current obsession with shorter-format games will promote players who are unable to bowl for more than 4 overs at a time, because they never have the chance - so we will start seeing even more injuries amongst bowlers in the longer form.

  • bobagorof on May 12, 2010, 1:28 GMT

    @Rakim - I think it's a bit much to say that the IPL has done more for cricket than anyone. The introduction of the IPL has enabled a select few players outside of India the chance to earn some extra money (some obscene amounts in certain cases, modest amounts in others). A few of these players are not recognised international stars, but the majority of them are already international players and thus are already well-paid by their own country's cricket boards. What it does do is provide an avenue for established stars to wind down their careers - players who are injury-prone and unlikely to make it through a Test series without being injured, such as Bond and Brett Lee, are able to play some abbreviated matches and earn some money without the stress of a Test series. But other than topping up a few bank accounts, how has the IPL benefited cricket? It does not promote the game outside of India, nor does it improve the standard of cricket being played at international level.

  • gzawilliam on May 12, 2010, 0:44 GMT

    I think he is half right and wrong here. Yes first class cricket in the longest format is very demanding on fast bowlers. But i think the fitness specialists and early academy coaches need to take some responsibilty in making sure these players have good structural integrity before starting one of the most demanding sporting professionals known to any sport.

    We see bowlers like Mitchell Johnson who for mine is the fittest player in all of cricket and i think he has done that early enough for him to survive a lot longer.

    In sports such as olympic lifting or more specifically kettlebell lifting i see the massive point of structural intergrity and body hardness. A lot like martial arts. No other sport needs injury prevention more than martial arts and i think cricket can take a lot from that discipline. Maybe Shane bond needed to step back after back issues and maybe talk to people like steve maxwell or other top mobility coaches. He would of survived longer. So sad for bond.

  • sabirshah on May 12, 2010, 0:25 GMT

    IPL is a money making championship and has not much to do with cricket and specially being proved all matches were fixed in IPL. It doesn't make any sense that IPL was helping cricket a lot. IPL was helping only the 'cricketers' thats true in terms of money and fame. It was helping Lalit moody he became top ten richest person of India. for cricket lovers it always brought disappointment. Me personally being a fan of Kolkata Knight Riders really can't believe how the IPL's strongest team gave up 3 of the editions!!!i'm sure thats match fixing involved here. ANd as being a fan of cricket its really disapointment to watch 'bookish (Planned)cricket"

  • on May 11, 2010, 23:57 GMT

    honestly, Test cricket is boring. replace them with ODI and 20s.

  • on May 11, 2010, 23:09 GMT

    We will miss you, bond. I love NewZealand cricket for some reasons, perhaps, your presence could be one.

  • crikkfan on May 11, 2010, 22:14 GMT

    one guy said "I hate how people are blaming everything to IPL. IPL has done more for cricket than anyone" . Can't blame sportmen for taking the shortest route to riches - but that's beside the point. Bond has retired from test cricket and so could so many other potentially injury-prone genuine fast bowlers - Nehra, Roach, Ishant, Umar Gul, Lee, Flintoff come to mind which is a LOSS for test cricket and cricket lovers. Can you argue against that? Is IPL hastening that decision-making, many would certainly think so. Thats the nature of the beast right now - whether we like it or not.

  • Rakim on May 11, 2010, 20:50 GMT

    I hate how people are blaming everything to IPL.

    IPL has done more for cricket than anyone. Wake up people, cricketers got lives and families too and they need money too like all of us.

    India is out, and the main cause is not IPL. I guess other teams are too good for them. When NBA players, (they have 82 games/year+playoffs, basketball is full contact, so you sure need rest), play for their nations they never blame their losses to fatigue or rules or game-style etc etc + You can't win anything without good bowlers >> India Good bowlers can win you Championships >> Pakistan (Saeed Ajmal, Shahid, Umar....)

  • on May 11, 2010, 19:47 GMT

    Alas||||world cricket has lost a great fast bowler ,,,,,,,,,,,

  • Ruri on May 11, 2010, 17:20 GMT

    Babya, I'd like to point out that England should also be on the list, they generally play the most tests per year, along with Australia, in addition to the less straining one-dayers and so on. NZ actually plays a fair amount of test cricket, and that too in windy, working conditions so they have a reason to have a bit of a hard time.

  • dakodi on May 11, 2010, 16:43 GMT

    Well IPL is playing a major role as the "Cricket Slayer". Most of the top class players are retiring before their time because of too much cricket being played and because of money. This is i'm afraid killing what was a true gentlemens game.

  • atulghadge on May 11, 2010, 15:53 GMT

    it's true we are loosing good pace blowers from test cricket first to go frintoff , lee , know Bond may we are loosing oram also. today when i watch around the world there is no grate fast blowers in test cricket there is some like stean , zaheer , johonson not more than that. so teams need to save there fast blowers

  • on May 11, 2010, 14:58 GMT

    The world would miss Bond in test cricket

  • ritwikspatil on May 11, 2010, 14:30 GMT

    shane bond is the best of all time,he should be knighted and called sir SHANE BOND

  • babya on May 11, 2010, 14:16 GMT

    in my opinion comparing to other teams NZ cricket calender is not at all busy..i am not harsh on nz but still they need to start winning major icc events or abroad.looking at their records their success rate is majorly in nz conditions..indian australian and rsa bowlers could be rested..but rest teams in my opinion are not overloaded..

  • _NEUTRAL_Fan_ on May 11, 2010, 13:14 GMT

    Good to see some in-sight from a modern fast bowler as to why things like injuries are plaguing quicks and HAMPERING the game of cricket. I can never stop watching the game but it is extremely annoying to see avg batsmen scoring like never b-4 and 1/2 decent slow bowlers out-bowling really talented quicks due to injuries and niggles, PATHETIC commercially driven pitches, mad schedules, ridiculously up-graded bats and tiny boundaries. For all we know, some of the laments I previously mentioned may be contributing to the frequency of injuries. I've aslo heard many say too much time is being spent in gym vs bowling. Cricket will always be a great sport, yes BUT we as fans should not be content with bowlers-particularly the real quicks being forced out of the game for the sake of trying to make evry batsman a hero. It was ok for a few yrs but it is time for the nonsense to stop. Just like cricket needs its batsmen, spinners,keepers-it also NEEDS its quicks. ICC needs to care for them.

  • on May 11, 2010, 9:53 GMT

    Bond, I think you're a great bowler, however, rest is not what NZ bowlers need right now. They barely play any Test cricket and when they play Test cricket, they look out of form. You get better by playing more cricket and not by resting. Guys like Southee, Martin need more time on field to develop their skills rather than off it.

  • on May 11, 2010, 8:58 GMT

    Shand BOND 008 ROXXX.What a great player.great pace and skill.

  • murihikukid on May 11, 2010, 8:56 GMT

    If one does a proper fitness program one will not suffer from the type of injuries that plagues NZCricket ... Thats the problem ..NZ Cricket hasn't a clue yet its CEO is a doctor ,,Its being completely dominated by player power ..an example is McCullums apparant refusal to play as wicketkeeper and today it cost us big time ...With McCullum as wicketkeeper and Jacob Oram we would have had a chance but no..we had to play Hopkins who has contributed nothing and left us a batsman down......Some of these highly paid cricketers seem to forget what its like earning from hard graft in a proper job working up to six days a week .. MK NZ

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  • murihikukid on May 11, 2010, 8:56 GMT

    If one does a proper fitness program one will not suffer from the type of injuries that plagues NZCricket ... Thats the problem ..NZ Cricket hasn't a clue yet its CEO is a doctor ,,Its being completely dominated by player power ..an example is McCullums apparant refusal to play as wicketkeeper and today it cost us big time ...With McCullum as wicketkeeper and Jacob Oram we would have had a chance but no..we had to play Hopkins who has contributed nothing and left us a batsman down......Some of these highly paid cricketers seem to forget what its like earning from hard graft in a proper job working up to six days a week .. MK NZ

  • on May 11, 2010, 8:58 GMT

    Shand BOND 008 ROXXX.What a great player.great pace and skill.

  • on May 11, 2010, 9:53 GMT

    Bond, I think you're a great bowler, however, rest is not what NZ bowlers need right now. They barely play any Test cricket and when they play Test cricket, they look out of form. You get better by playing more cricket and not by resting. Guys like Southee, Martin need more time on field to develop their skills rather than off it.

  • _NEUTRAL_Fan_ on May 11, 2010, 13:14 GMT

    Good to see some in-sight from a modern fast bowler as to why things like injuries are plaguing quicks and HAMPERING the game of cricket. I can never stop watching the game but it is extremely annoying to see avg batsmen scoring like never b-4 and 1/2 decent slow bowlers out-bowling really talented quicks due to injuries and niggles, PATHETIC commercially driven pitches, mad schedules, ridiculously up-graded bats and tiny boundaries. For all we know, some of the laments I previously mentioned may be contributing to the frequency of injuries. I've aslo heard many say too much time is being spent in gym vs bowling. Cricket will always be a great sport, yes BUT we as fans should not be content with bowlers-particularly the real quicks being forced out of the game for the sake of trying to make evry batsman a hero. It was ok for a few yrs but it is time for the nonsense to stop. Just like cricket needs its batsmen, spinners,keepers-it also NEEDS its quicks. ICC needs to care for them.

  • babya on May 11, 2010, 14:16 GMT

    in my opinion comparing to other teams NZ cricket calender is not at all busy..i am not harsh on nz but still they need to start winning major icc events or abroad.looking at their records their success rate is majorly in nz conditions..indian australian and rsa bowlers could be rested..but rest teams in my opinion are not overloaded..

  • ritwikspatil on May 11, 2010, 14:30 GMT

    shane bond is the best of all time,he should be knighted and called sir SHANE BOND

  • on May 11, 2010, 14:58 GMT

    The world would miss Bond in test cricket

  • atulghadge on May 11, 2010, 15:53 GMT

    it's true we are loosing good pace blowers from test cricket first to go frintoff , lee , know Bond may we are loosing oram also. today when i watch around the world there is no grate fast blowers in test cricket there is some like stean , zaheer , johonson not more than that. so teams need to save there fast blowers

  • dakodi on May 11, 2010, 16:43 GMT

    Well IPL is playing a major role as the "Cricket Slayer". Most of the top class players are retiring before their time because of too much cricket being played and because of money. This is i'm afraid killing what was a true gentlemens game.

  • Ruri on May 11, 2010, 17:20 GMT

    Babya, I'd like to point out that England should also be on the list, they generally play the most tests per year, along with Australia, in addition to the less straining one-dayers and so on. NZ actually plays a fair amount of test cricket, and that too in windy, working conditions so they have a reason to have a bit of a hard time.