Michael Holding: Having beaten Australia in Australia in 1979-80 - the first time West Indies had ever done so - we were on a high as we moved to New Zealand. However, we struggled in the first Test at Dunedin in the face of some terrible umpiring. On the rest day the DJs on the local radio stations were referring to the West Indies as a bunch of whingers. Things came to a head during New Zealand's small chase when John Parker [the batsman in the picture], the last recognized batsman, was allowed to stay though he was palpably out. The photograph clearly shows that he had taken his gloves off and put his bat under his arm and was headed for the pavilion. But he stood his ground when the umpire didn't raise the finger. It was an unbelievable decision and I totally lost my cool, though I was to regret my actions later. Photograph by Getty Images

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