Is this being taped?

There's something sinisterly fun about using silicone strips on bats. At least more fun than talking about England

Andrew Hughes

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The first bat Don Bradman used in his Test career is to be auctioned off in Melbourne, September 24, 2008
Would Hot Spot pick up nicks on linseed oil-soaked bats of the past? And why hasn't anyone tried it out yet? © AFP
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So now a humble roll of silicone-based tape can be added to the other exhibits at the Museum of Cricket Naughtiness, which include a pocketful of compost, a bag of centrally contracted Ashes-winning boiled sweets, a sprinkling of angry jelly beans, a badly damaged bottle top, and a fragment of one of Shahid Afridi's incisors.

This episode of silicone-based silliness has also given us a glimpse into the strange, Alice-in-Wonderland realm that is professional cricket, the inhabitants of which maintain a joyfully idiosyncratic approach to matters of ethics.

Here, for instance, is Michael Vaughan's reaction to Siliconegate:

"Silicone tape, my arse…"

For the avoidance of doubt, reader, that was not a request. Michael pooh-poohs the very idea of a cricketer dabbling in such things. Applying silicone-based tape to the edge of a bat? Why that's ludicrous, the stuff of science fiction. Silicone tape on a bat? Ha! Preposterous!

"Has Vaseline on the outside edge saved the day for Laxman?"

Petroleum jelly on a bat, now that is much more likely.

To be fair to the former England captain, there is a difference between what he implied in 2011, and his response to this summer's silicone slander. Allow me to explain:

1. Kevin Pietersen plays for England
2. VVS Laxman has never played for England.

I hope that makes things clearer.

Of course, all this chat about surreptitious bat-gilding has stopped us talking about how good England are, which is a blessing, because talking about how good England are isn't much of a conversation. It tends to go like this:

"I see England have retained the Ashes. They are a remarkably consistent team."

"Yes, remarkably consistent. And efficient."

"Absolutely, very efficient. And organised."

"Yes, I concur. They are exceedingly well-organised."

"In fact, I sometimes wonder whether their organisation has something to do with their being remarkably consistent."

"Do you know, I think you're right. Their efficiency probably helps too."

"I wouldn't be at all surprised. And let's not forget how reliable their players are."

"Indeed. Do you remember that shot Jonathan Trott played?"

"No, not really."

"No, me neither."

"They say it may rain tomorrow?"

"Oh dear."

"Well, bye then."

"Bye."

I have no idea whether or not batsmen have been lining their bats with space-age super tape, but I hope it's true. There's a hint of the 18th century skulduggery about these accusations of silicone subterfuge, a reminder of a time when bats were curved, hats were tricorn, no one wore pads and rules were for sissies. And, let's face it, talking about cheating, umpiring blunders, and infra-red ghost nicks is far more fun than talking about the Ashes.

Andrew Hughes is a writer currently based in England. He tweets here

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Posted by SagirParkar on (August 11, 2013, 11:53 GMT)

ahh Mr Hughes, you have very vividly remembered the infamous Vaseline tweet... and timely reminded us about how some people can be so prejudiced and biased in their 'expert opinion'.

i am not a big fan of the guy, and for all his exploits on the field of play, he sadly has very little knowledge to share about actual cricket.. even his 'commentary' on radio is full of anecdotes rather than about the flow of the game or providing insights on strategies..

Posted by dummy4fb on (August 10, 2013, 8:12 GMT)

"Silicone tape, my arse… For the avoidance of doubt, reader, that was not a request." I never laughed so hard reading page2. Very funny and keep it up, Mr. Hughes.

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Andrew Hughes
Andrew Hughes is a writer and avid cricket watcher who has always retained a healthy suspicion of professional sportsmen, and like any right-thinking person rates Neville Cardus more highly than Don Bradman. His latest book is available here and here @hughandrews73

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Andrew Hughes Andrew Hughes is a writer and avid cricket watcher who has always retained a healthy suspicion of professional sportsmen, and like any right-thinking person rates Neville Cardus more highly than Don Bradman. His latest book is available here and here @hughandrews73
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