Pakistan v Australia 2010 July 20, 2010

Ponting asks for UDRS across the board

26

Australia captain Ricky Ponting has called on the ICC to make sure the Umpire Decision Review System is used in every series, after the Pakistan board did not put the system in place for the neutral series in England. As the "home" board, the PCB is in charge of such matters, and the UDRS will be used for the upcoming Pakistan-England series.

However, it is also not being implemented in the Sri Lanka-India Test series, which prompted the Sri Lanka captain Kumar Sangakkara to express his disappointment. Ponting has also become used to the UDRS and although the on-field umpires had a reasonably good match at Lord's, he would have preferred consistency across series.

"I got my point across at the referee's meeting before the series. I think that even the ICC could have stepped in on this occasion," Ponting said. "It's a financial thing at the end of the day, that's the reason we are not using it. I thought the ICC could have come in and done something about it. It hasn't eventuated so we've just got to get on with it now.

"You do get used to playing a certain way and having some decisions sent back for a referral. But that's all we've got so we just have to get on with it and let the umpires do their job out in the middle. I think Pakistan just didn't get around to getting it organised quick enough or something. That was the way it was explained to us at the referee's meeting."

The cost of the UDRS is one of the major stumbling blocks, and there are also issues around the availability of the equipment. However, given that the system was rolled out properly after a lengthy trial process, Ponting believed the ICC should have stepped in to ensure it was used.

"I don't know the ins and outs of the whole thing and the way it's being run," Ponting said. "In a series like this one which is a neutral one there is always going to be that dispute about who's paying for it and should we use it. It was brought in as compulsory in Test cricket 12 months ago now. I felt if it was ever left up in the air that someone should have stepped in and made sure that it actually happened."

Haroon Lorgat, the chief executive of the ICC, defended the current process. Speaking on Test Match Special last week, he said there were several issues that determined whether the UDRS was to be used in the Pakistan-Australia series.

"I understood there were some technical difficulties in getting it up and running before the first Test got going," Lorgat said. "The way we fashion the current scenario is for the home team in consultation with the visitors to determine if they want DRS or not. That's part of the process that we're walking to introduce it on a permanent basis."

Brydon Coverdale is a staff writer at Cricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Aasi_786 on July 24, 2010, 9:09 GMT

    Yes, It is very useful for any test series and should be done it. Because justice should be done in every moment.

  • amin4865 on July 23, 2010, 15:17 GMT

    Obviously Aussies and English are fond of this while they tried to avoid!! Things are going against them as they failed to get things in their favor.

  • Ravi_gupta23 on July 23, 2010, 4:52 GMT

    The subcontinent teams feel that umpiring decisions often go against them. But now it is seen that subcontinent teams are resisting use of UDRS which can give them edge over england or Australia. But now they cannot complain as they themselves are to blame for not taking advantage of technology available.

  • Ravi_gupta23 on July 23, 2010, 4:24 GMT

    I think the sub continent teams often find that umpiring decisions go against them. Ironically now these teams are not forthcoming in supporting the use of UDRS. Now India or Pakistan cannot blame australian or english umpires and be ready to accept decisions sportingly.

  • landl47 on July 23, 2010, 3:18 GMT

    Of course the UDRS must be used- it's absolutely ridiculous that people watching on TV can see a decision reviewed and know that it's wrong, but the umpires and players can't have it reviewed. In my view that undermines the umpires position even more; in the old days, people often disagreed with umpires' decisions, but it was a matter of opinion. Now we KNOW when an umpire has made a bad decision. I believe every 'out' decision should be reviewed, first to ensure that it wasn't a no-ball and then to make sure there were no other issues. The fielding side should continue to have two challenges; you can't have every appeal reviewed because some cricketers would be appealing 3 times an over. With that in place, the umpires could relax, knowing that the replay will show they are right 90% of the time and the occasional error will be corrected.

  • on July 21, 2010, 21:58 GMT

    I agree with all of the views in regards to UDRS..... That it should be in place at all venues and for all matches . But as VILANDER says it must have all type of technologies to support UDRS, We can not have one available and other one left out as in India Srilanka series. The amount of money all cricket boards get from the TV channels should compansate the cost of UDRS. I am sure we all FANS OF CRICKET would love to watch a fair and error free game of cricket.... no matter who wins, that win will be a credential one, won by a team not by Bad umpiring decisions.

  • whoster on July 21, 2010, 8:01 GMT

    Either the UDRS is used for EVERY Test series, or not at all - it's as simple as that. After a few teething troubles, many people who were initially against it (like myself) have seen the system improved. The bottom line is that we all want to see obviously bad umpiring decisions overturned, and more correct decisions being given. It's a difficult balancing act to use UDRS and not take away the authority of umpires, but the UDRS has worked well with a bit of tinkering, so the ICC has got to sort out this matter. The worst possible scenario is for it to be used for some Tests and not for others; as that will confuse things more than ever. I believe Ponting is right to raise his concerns. It's most definitely an 'all or nothing' situation.

  • tfjones1978 on July 21, 2010, 6:51 GMT

    Ponting is spot on with this. UDRS is a necessity & should be brought in across the board & paid by the ICC. Any test country that refuses to use the technology should be stripped of their pts from each match that they refuse & the pts be given to their opponent.

    Home teams already have home crowd, home grounds & home pitch (home pitch needs to be regulated by ICC as well), so having umpires which financially benefit from "mistakes" made by not using UDRS is stupid.

    In Aust there has been a large drop off in Cricket following since the Aust Cricket Team (and not the umpires) were blamed for the umpiring decisions last time India were here.

    It is the responsibility of each cricket team to win at all costs. If they step out of line it is the duty of the umpire to pull them back in through appropriate warnings.

    Regarding the Sydney situation, Aust Cricket Team were blamed for "appealing too much". The irony is Asian teams refuse to use a system which would create a level playing field

  • shaen on July 21, 2010, 4:45 GMT

    I've never seen all (bar one obvious nutter) posts agree on one subject before....here or anywhere else. That in it'self is a convincing argument in favour of Udrs.

  • on July 21, 2010, 3:37 GMT

    @ arvs2001 - have you no idea? Ponting wants the UDRS in place for every series. I doubt whether we'll see it in the upcoming India v Australia series though - India has too much to lose by agreeing to use it.

  • Aasi_786 on July 24, 2010, 9:09 GMT

    Yes, It is very useful for any test series and should be done it. Because justice should be done in every moment.

  • amin4865 on July 23, 2010, 15:17 GMT

    Obviously Aussies and English are fond of this while they tried to avoid!! Things are going against them as they failed to get things in their favor.

  • Ravi_gupta23 on July 23, 2010, 4:52 GMT

    The subcontinent teams feel that umpiring decisions often go against them. But now it is seen that subcontinent teams are resisting use of UDRS which can give them edge over england or Australia. But now they cannot complain as they themselves are to blame for not taking advantage of technology available.

  • Ravi_gupta23 on July 23, 2010, 4:24 GMT

    I think the sub continent teams often find that umpiring decisions go against them. Ironically now these teams are not forthcoming in supporting the use of UDRS. Now India or Pakistan cannot blame australian or english umpires and be ready to accept decisions sportingly.

  • landl47 on July 23, 2010, 3:18 GMT

    Of course the UDRS must be used- it's absolutely ridiculous that people watching on TV can see a decision reviewed and know that it's wrong, but the umpires and players can't have it reviewed. In my view that undermines the umpires position even more; in the old days, people often disagreed with umpires' decisions, but it was a matter of opinion. Now we KNOW when an umpire has made a bad decision. I believe every 'out' decision should be reviewed, first to ensure that it wasn't a no-ball and then to make sure there were no other issues. The fielding side should continue to have two challenges; you can't have every appeal reviewed because some cricketers would be appealing 3 times an over. With that in place, the umpires could relax, knowing that the replay will show they are right 90% of the time and the occasional error will be corrected.

  • on July 21, 2010, 21:58 GMT

    I agree with all of the views in regards to UDRS..... That it should be in place at all venues and for all matches . But as VILANDER says it must have all type of technologies to support UDRS, We can not have one available and other one left out as in India Srilanka series. The amount of money all cricket boards get from the TV channels should compansate the cost of UDRS. I am sure we all FANS OF CRICKET would love to watch a fair and error free game of cricket.... no matter who wins, that win will be a credential one, won by a team not by Bad umpiring decisions.

  • whoster on July 21, 2010, 8:01 GMT

    Either the UDRS is used for EVERY Test series, or not at all - it's as simple as that. After a few teething troubles, many people who were initially against it (like myself) have seen the system improved. The bottom line is that we all want to see obviously bad umpiring decisions overturned, and more correct decisions being given. It's a difficult balancing act to use UDRS and not take away the authority of umpires, but the UDRS has worked well with a bit of tinkering, so the ICC has got to sort out this matter. The worst possible scenario is for it to be used for some Tests and not for others; as that will confuse things more than ever. I believe Ponting is right to raise his concerns. It's most definitely an 'all or nothing' situation.

  • tfjones1978 on July 21, 2010, 6:51 GMT

    Ponting is spot on with this. UDRS is a necessity & should be brought in across the board & paid by the ICC. Any test country that refuses to use the technology should be stripped of their pts from each match that they refuse & the pts be given to their opponent.

    Home teams already have home crowd, home grounds & home pitch (home pitch needs to be regulated by ICC as well), so having umpires which financially benefit from "mistakes" made by not using UDRS is stupid.

    In Aust there has been a large drop off in Cricket following since the Aust Cricket Team (and not the umpires) were blamed for the umpiring decisions last time India were here.

    It is the responsibility of each cricket team to win at all costs. If they step out of line it is the duty of the umpire to pull them back in through appropriate warnings.

    Regarding the Sydney situation, Aust Cricket Team were blamed for "appealing too much". The irony is Asian teams refuse to use a system which would create a level playing field

  • shaen on July 21, 2010, 4:45 GMT

    I've never seen all (bar one obvious nutter) posts agree on one subject before....here or anywhere else. That in it'self is a convincing argument in favour of Udrs.

  • on July 21, 2010, 3:37 GMT

    @ arvs2001 - have you no idea? Ponting wants the UDRS in place for every series. I doubt whether we'll see it in the upcoming India v Australia series though - India has too much to lose by agreeing to use it.

  • Rooboy on July 21, 2010, 2:44 GMT

    @arvs2001, did you even read the article?! What do you mean by 'this is a unified decision by every cricket playing nation' ... there is no unified decision at present and that is what Ponting wants!! Ricky Ponting is the captain of one of the top ranked teams and is a champion of the game, so to say 'who cares about what ponting has to say' is just really childish, and your comments about the consistency of his decision making are as irrelevant as they are confusing. Highly doubt the system will be in place for the Aus v India series in india. Why would the indians give up the massive advantage they get every home series from the umpires? Yes, Aus usually get favoured at home too, but we have no problem with the URDS .. everyone who brings up Sydney, I'll see that and raise you the 2001 series in india where the problems with the umpiring were more to do with blatant cheating than mere incompetence. Keep getting told how much power and money the BCCI has, how can they cry poor on this

  • Jegs on July 20, 2010, 21:08 GMT

    What is the point in having a rankings table when different series are played under different rules? UDRS will be the best thing to have happened to test cricket once they bring it in permanently and they should get it into one day cricket as well especially the world cup. Its the fairest way to deal with umpiring errors!!

  • arvs2001 on July 20, 2010, 17:03 GMT

    who cares about what ponting has to say. ponting does not have the credibility and consistency in his decision making. this is a unified decision by every cricket playing nation. i am sure it will only enhance the quality of the game to be more fair.

  • crktcrazzy on July 20, 2010, 15:44 GMT

    look at the irony ind was the country which raised hue in cry in aus in 07-08 regarding umpiring dec, threatnd to leave the tour mid way and now refusing to use the system such hypocrisy

  • Vilander on July 20, 2010, 15:35 GMT

    the system should have all available technologies not a few of them like what is the case in srilanka, not having thermal sensors is a deal breaker..simple, dont blame india for not accepting UDRS without thermal sensors..

  • _Australian_ on July 20, 2010, 15:19 GMT

    The ICC should make it mandatory for all international games. We should definately use technology wherever possible. Key decisions can cost you not only a series but possibly a World Cup. The system has proven itself so far and makes for a fairer contest between bat and ball. Let's not be like the recent soccer world cup where simple technology was sorely missed for many teams. Imagine if it was in place for the Sydney test v India. (I am aware it was not used back then) The result might have changed. This is a clear example of why the BCCI should pull it's dummy out of it's mouth and support it.

  • on July 20, 2010, 14:54 GMT

    I think people are getting unduly excited by the UDRS and blaming India for it's non-usage - it is meant to cut out the obvious howlers - when it comes to marginal decisions/close calls it is as good as the officials who use it - as someone said about a particular Umpire - "If you want an argument in favour of the UDRS put him on the field - if you want one against, put him behind the TV"...

  • ajn1970 on July 20, 2010, 13:31 GMT

    India may not accept for the DRS in the near future, but it is forced to play more tests to retain the no.1 position. So advantage India Opponents (Rest of World) Accept to play test series against India (Home/Away) on a condition that it uses or accepts DRS. Once India goes with DRS regularly it, becomes easy for ICC to make DRS mandatory since ICC is indirectly run by BCCI. The fate of world cricket is now in the hands of BCCI. Once we were abusing the aussie board for influencing any changes but now it is worse in the hands of BCCI. For the sake of this gentlemen's game (?) let ICC act purely on its own or ECB influence the ICC where the game will get the respect it deserves. It is a shame that the richest sports body in the world cannot afford to spend anything for the DRS. Either BCCI should be free from the politicians or ICC should get away from BCCI influence or else the beauty of this game will die very early. All the living legends should come forward and fight for the game.

  • deanc on July 20, 2010, 13:27 GMT

    I suspect this will come to a head soon as Aus head to Ind for the forthcoming test series. The BCCI of course will not want to use the system and IF they claim it's for financial reasons then watch the sparks fly....

  • rohanbala on July 20, 2010, 13:21 GMT

    ICC should make it mandatory for use of UDRS for every series with no choice of either the host or the visiting teams.. Probably, the ICC is hesitant to do so, to avoid exposing the fallibilities of some of its Umpires in the process.

  • johntycodes on July 20, 2010, 12:35 GMT

    How cheap are the countries that don't use it. India don't want to use them so they can still have there biased umpiring lbw decisions rife in test cricket in india.

  • jonesy2 on July 20, 2010, 12:04 GMT

    I cant believe that they arent used in all series. what is the point of having them in some and not others? it is a joke. i like them personally and i think they can only help in stamping out bad decisiions (usually made at the expensive of the mighty australians).

  • Smithie on July 20, 2010, 10:58 GMT

    Come on Ricky, put the pressure on the Indians NOW to ensure it is place for your visit there in October. Do not give the BCCI any wriggle room to squib out of it.

  • Itchy on July 20, 2010, 10:28 GMT

    Totally agree with Ponting (& to a degree Ian Chappell) on this - either implement across the board in all series or get rid of it all together. Any supporters that continue to complain about poor decisions can then blame their ICC delegates as these delegates seem to be the ones who are most active in deciding not to use the UDRS. ICC needs to assist in the financial side of things to ensure consistency across all series.

  • Kirk-at-Lords on July 20, 2010, 9:45 GMT

    The ICC simply must listen to two top captains (Ponting, and Sanghakkara of Sri Lanka) and implement the UDRS properly. This could mean withdrawing UDRS back into trials with no player referrals, which I would strongly recommend at this point. This would also allow time for the ICC to figure out the economics and equipment availability issues with sponsors and broadcasters. With even umpires sporting logos for an airline, there must be some way to cover the cost. It is a mere pittance of any TV contract in any case. A sport awash in money simply cannot plead poverty on such a vital matter, particularly with new concerns about match-fixing and other on-field chicanery in the air. In short: if the ICC cannot manage this, it cannot manage anything, and cricket needs a complete revamp of its governance at the earliest possible moment. In that event, call a World Cricket Convention!

  • ayaz_mewati on July 20, 2010, 9:36 GMT

    Absolutely right Mr. Ponting. The boards shouldn't be allowed to take the decision on this and the ICC must make the system mandatory. The system is indeed very interesting and good for the game.

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  • ayaz_mewati on July 20, 2010, 9:36 GMT

    Absolutely right Mr. Ponting. The boards shouldn't be allowed to take the decision on this and the ICC must make the system mandatory. The system is indeed very interesting and good for the game.

  • Kirk-at-Lords on July 20, 2010, 9:45 GMT

    The ICC simply must listen to two top captains (Ponting, and Sanghakkara of Sri Lanka) and implement the UDRS properly. This could mean withdrawing UDRS back into trials with no player referrals, which I would strongly recommend at this point. This would also allow time for the ICC to figure out the economics and equipment availability issues with sponsors and broadcasters. With even umpires sporting logos for an airline, there must be some way to cover the cost. It is a mere pittance of any TV contract in any case. A sport awash in money simply cannot plead poverty on such a vital matter, particularly with new concerns about match-fixing and other on-field chicanery in the air. In short: if the ICC cannot manage this, it cannot manage anything, and cricket needs a complete revamp of its governance at the earliest possible moment. In that event, call a World Cricket Convention!

  • Itchy on July 20, 2010, 10:28 GMT

    Totally agree with Ponting (& to a degree Ian Chappell) on this - either implement across the board in all series or get rid of it all together. Any supporters that continue to complain about poor decisions can then blame their ICC delegates as these delegates seem to be the ones who are most active in deciding not to use the UDRS. ICC needs to assist in the financial side of things to ensure consistency across all series.

  • Smithie on July 20, 2010, 10:58 GMT

    Come on Ricky, put the pressure on the Indians NOW to ensure it is place for your visit there in October. Do not give the BCCI any wriggle room to squib out of it.

  • jonesy2 on July 20, 2010, 12:04 GMT

    I cant believe that they arent used in all series. what is the point of having them in some and not others? it is a joke. i like them personally and i think they can only help in stamping out bad decisiions (usually made at the expensive of the mighty australians).

  • johntycodes on July 20, 2010, 12:35 GMT

    How cheap are the countries that don't use it. India don't want to use them so they can still have there biased umpiring lbw decisions rife in test cricket in india.

  • rohanbala on July 20, 2010, 13:21 GMT

    ICC should make it mandatory for use of UDRS for every series with no choice of either the host or the visiting teams.. Probably, the ICC is hesitant to do so, to avoid exposing the fallibilities of some of its Umpires in the process.

  • deanc on July 20, 2010, 13:27 GMT

    I suspect this will come to a head soon as Aus head to Ind for the forthcoming test series. The BCCI of course will not want to use the system and IF they claim it's for financial reasons then watch the sparks fly....

  • ajn1970 on July 20, 2010, 13:31 GMT

    India may not accept for the DRS in the near future, but it is forced to play more tests to retain the no.1 position. So advantage India Opponents (Rest of World) Accept to play test series against India (Home/Away) on a condition that it uses or accepts DRS. Once India goes with DRS regularly it, becomes easy for ICC to make DRS mandatory since ICC is indirectly run by BCCI. The fate of world cricket is now in the hands of BCCI. Once we were abusing the aussie board for influencing any changes but now it is worse in the hands of BCCI. For the sake of this gentlemen's game (?) let ICC act purely on its own or ECB influence the ICC where the game will get the respect it deserves. It is a shame that the richest sports body in the world cannot afford to spend anything for the DRS. Either BCCI should be free from the politicians or ICC should get away from BCCI influence or else the beauty of this game will die very early. All the living legends should come forward and fight for the game.

  • on July 20, 2010, 14:54 GMT

    I think people are getting unduly excited by the UDRS and blaming India for it's non-usage - it is meant to cut out the obvious howlers - when it comes to marginal decisions/close calls it is as good as the officials who use it - as someone said about a particular Umpire - "If you want an argument in favour of the UDRS put him on the field - if you want one against, put him behind the TV"...